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Der Soziopath von nebenan: Die Skrupellosen:…
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Der Soziopath von nebenan: Die Skrupellosen: ihre Lügen, Taktiken und… (original 2005; edition 2006)

by Martha Stout, Karsten Petersen (Translator)

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1,236636,431 (3.58)58
Member:clawood
Title:Der Soziopath von nebenan: Die Skrupellosen: ihre Lügen, Taktiken und Tricks (German Edition)
Authors:Martha Stout
Other authors:Karsten Petersen (Translator)
Info:Springer (2006), Edition: 4th Printing., Hardcover, 306 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Sociopath Next Door by Martha Stout (2005)

  1. 01
    Lunch with a Sociopath by Lucie Lilly Pawlak (lucie.lilly)
  2. 02
    American Wife by Curtis Sittenfeld (susanbooks)
    susanbooks: One of Stout's examples seems to be a not-so-thinly veiled George Bush. Interesting to read the nonfictional (but speculative) & fictional portrayals together.
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English (62)  Swedish (1)  All languages (63)
Showing 1-5 of 62 (next | show all)
I thought this book was a fascinating read, made intentionally lighter for the layperson like me. I just wish she had included more examples of sociopaths “in action”. I was especially disappointed that she didn’t have more stories about “slacker” sociopaths, because I think all of us have encountered more of those than the “world domination” variety.

Of course, the problem with reading anything like this is the tendency for the reader to go around diagnosing every jerk they encounter {Hmmm… I don’t think she’s a sociopath, just a narcissist}. I had a list of several people who wanted this book before I was halfway finished.
( )
  memccauley6 | May 3, 2016 |
I now think everyone is a sociopath... Thanks! Just kidding. ( )
  kristina_brooke | Apr 15, 2016 |
Simon Bubb
  jmail | Mar 21, 2016 |
The book does talk about the sociopathic mind, but doesn't really give any new information that a critical thinker wouldn't have already figured out.

The arrogance of the author reeks unashamedly throughout the book. For example at the beginning of chapter four, in her description of a 34 yr. old woman, she clearly portrays hard-working, blue-collar, country people as being inferior to 'sophisticated', highly educated, highly paid, city lovers.

Ms. Stout touts a liberal feminist ideology, but can't see her own hypocrisy when writing words like, "Luckily, her body is excellent." Is she blind to seeing how such thoughts go contrary to the National Organization for Women (in 1971) launching a full frontal assault on Barbie, condemning Mattel, as well as several other companies, for sexist advertising?

I'm not criticizing this book because Ms. Stout's perception of life isn't in full agreement with mine. I'm disturbed because of knowing that as people read her information in chapter three about Stanley Milgram's experiment, most of them will not even realize that their consciences are being tranquilized by Martha's words because of perceiving her to be the higher (or highest?) authority (i.e., the white coat wearer) due to her being 'trained' at the 'famous' McLean psychiatric hospital and being an employee in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Judging consciences based on what is seen or what someone says about someone provides an open door to power for the one who has authorized credentials. Before adding more light upon Stout's performance, I must say her book is an interesting read and can offer much for readers to think about.

I've noticed flaws in her diagnosing, but since I'm not a licensed mental health practitioner, it seems wise for me to keep my mouth shut about what I've observed in regard to relevant factors she seems to either have ignored or maybe knows nothing about. I agree that some sociopaths will use the 'pity me' card, but for her to say that the best clue for recognizing a sociopath, of all things, is the pity play? It can be a clue, but if you're going to depend on that for spotting one, you will put yourself at risk for being played the fool. There are many sociopaths who are too smart and/or proud to employ that tactic.

The conscience has nothing to do with determining what is right and what is wrong. To determine what is right and what is wrong one uses one's "judgment." The conscience commends us when we do what our "judgment" tells us is right; and it condemns us when we do what our "judgment" tells us is wrong.

The conscience is a safe guide in determining whether our conduct is in harmony with our "judgment." But the problem is our "judgment" gets molded by whatever or whoever we worship. If we worship those who make judgments based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, then our foundation is unstable since this statistical manual is always mutating (e.g., their definition of homosexuality went from mental illness to alternate lifestyle). Language changes, societies change, but truth never changes.

Conscience is not intended to serve as a standard of right and wrong; it is possible to defile the conscience, and it is possible to "sear" the conscience. Whether a person has a pure conscience, weak one, or defiled one, each type of individual will justify themselves according to what they want to believe. When it comes to someone making a living by this profession, it's easy for that person to manipulate those who don't know what a pure conscience looks like.

Enjoy Stout's book, but compare its spirit with what's portrayed of the Godly men in the bible. ( )
1 vote faithfilly | Jan 28, 2016 |
I would rate this a 4.25. I knew little of what to look for in sociopath. this book opened my eyes to some of the traits they posses, and some they do not. ( )
  JWarrenBenton | Jan 4, 2016 |
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For Steve Stout, my brother and the person I think of first when I think of strength of character
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Imagine—if you can—not having a conscience, none at all, no feelings of guilt or remorse no matter what you do, no limiting sense of concern for the well-being of strangers, friends or even family members.
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The conscience of a people is their power. - John Dryden
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Who is the devil you know?

Is it your lying, cheating ex-husband?
Your sadistic high school gym teacher?
Your boss who loves to humiliate people in meetings?
The colleague who stole your idea and passed it off as her own?

In the pages of The Sociopath Next Door, you will realize that your ex was not just misunderstood. He’s a sociopath. And your boss, teacher, and colleague? They may be sociopaths too.

We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in The Sociopath Next Door, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people—one in twenty-five—has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in twenty-five everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath. They could be your colleague, your neighbor, even family. And they can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.

How do we recognize the remorseless? One of their chief characteristics is a kind of glow or charisma that makes sociopaths more charming or interesting than the other people around them. They’re more spontaneous, more intense, more complex, or even sexier than everyone else, making them tricky to identify and leaving us easily seduced. Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others’ suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.

The fact is, we all almost certainly know at least one or more sociopaths already. Part of the urgency in reading The Sociopath Next Door is the moment when we suddenly recognize that someone we know—someone we worked for, or were involved with, or voted for—is a sociopath. But what do we do with that knowledge? To arm us against the sociopath, Dr. Stout teaches us to question authority, suspect flattery, and beware the pity play. Above all, she writes, when a sociopath is beckoning, do not join the game.

It is the ruthless versus the rest of us, and The Sociopath Next Door will show you how to recognize and defeat the devil you know.

Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0767915828, Paperback)

Who is the devil you know?

Is it your lying, cheating ex-husband?
Your sadistic high school gym teacher?
Your boss who loves to humiliate people in meetings?
The colleague who stole your idea and passed it off as her own?

In the pages of The Sociopath Next Door, you will realize that your ex was not just misunderstood. He’s a sociopath. And your boss, teacher, and colleague? They may be sociopaths too.

We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in The Sociopath Next Door, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people—one in twenty-five—has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in twenty-five everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath. They could be your colleague, your neighbor, even family. And they can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.

How do we recognize the remorseless? One of their chief characteristics is a kind of glow or charisma that makes sociopaths more charming or interesting than the other people around them. They’re more spontaneous, more intense, more complex, or even sexier than everyone else, making them tricky to identify and leaving us easily seduced. Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others’ suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.

The fact is, we all almost certainly know at least one or more sociopaths already. Part of the urgency in reading The Sociopath Next Door is the moment when we suddenly recognize that someone we know—someone we worked for, or were involved with, or voted for—is a sociopath. But what do we do with that knowledge? To arm us against the sociopath, Dr. Stout teaches us to question authority, suspect flattery, and beware the pity play. Above all, she writes, when a sociopath is beckoning, do not join the game.

It is the ruthless versus the rest of us, and The Sociopath Next Door will show you how to recognize and defeat the devil you know.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:37 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

[The author] reveals [in this book] that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people--one in twenty-five--has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse.... They can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.... Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others' suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.... To arm us against the sociopath, [the author] teaches us to question authority, suspect flattery, and beware the pity play. Above all, she writes, when a sociopath is beckoning, do not join the game. -BooksInPrint.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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