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Der Soziopath von nebenan: Die Skrupellosen:…
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Der Soziopath von nebenan: Die Skrupellosen: ihre Lügen, Taktiken und… (original 2005; edition 2006)

by Martha Stout, Karsten Petersen (Translator)

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1,120557,356 (3.62)56
Member:clawood
Title:Der Soziopath von nebenan: Die Skrupellosen: ihre Lügen, Taktiken und Tricks (German Edition)
Authors:Martha Stout
Other authors:Karsten Petersen (Translator)
Info:Springer (2006), Edition: 4th Printing., Hardcover, 306 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Sociopath Next Door by Martha Stout (2005)

  1. 01
    Lunch with a Sociopath by Lucie Lilly Pawlak (lucie.lilly)
  2. 02
    American Wife by Curtis Sittenfeld (susanbooks)
    susanbooks: One of Stout's examples seems to be a not-so-thinly veiled George Bush. Interesting to read the nonfictional (but speculative) & fictional portrayals together.
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Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
The Sociopath Next Door was a great read by Martha Sout. She does an excellent job explaining what a sociopath is and then gives 4 examples throughout the book. I never gave this disease a thought until I read this . ( )
  tess_schoolmarm | Aug 7, 2015 |
I want to give this book less stars as more time goes on. I feel the author's words were too slanted by her own opinions and prejudices. I also feel that saying people don't have a conscience is just a convenient explanation, but in my opinion, is not really true. ( )
  KR_Patterson | Apr 28, 2015 |
"Psychologically speaking, conscience is a sense of obligation ultimately based in an emotional attachment to another living creature (often but not always a human being), or to a group of human beings, or even in some cases to humanity as a whole."

The last few books I have read featured sociopaths and/or narcissists, so this book caught my eye! As the cover and title suggest, it is alarmist and sensationalist. It was also a bit shallow and repetitive.

The parts I found most interesting in this book were:
1) “Thirteen Rules for Dealing with Sociopaths in Everyday Life”
2) The case studies were cartoonish, but they were effective in illustrating that a sociopath is not necessarily the psycho murderous criminal you might imagine. (ex. The slacker story.)
3) Interesting discussion on conscience.
4) The book is about 10 years at the point and many of the experiments Stout references are much older than that. In fact, you've probably seen these studies referenced many times before in other books. Even so, it is interesting to read the results of these older experiments.

I think this book would be most useful for people who have dealt with or are dealing with an actual sociopath. I could also recommend it for someone who wants a quick overview on conscience and sociopathy. ( )
  tbritny | Mar 10, 2015 |
I was hoping for more individual stories rather than just an expanded treatise on sociopaths. Still an interesting read though ( )
  hazysaffron | Feb 17, 2015 |
I recommend this to pretty much everyone. It's eye-opening and very useful, because chances are there is a sociopath in your life. Reading this will help you to recognize what you're dealing with and deal with it more effectively. It will help prevent you from being harmed by people who are unable to feel any emotional attachment to other people. The book also offers profound, inspiring thoughts about what conscience is, where it comes from, and how central it is to our humanity. ( )
1 vote TrgLlyLibrarian | Feb 1, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
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Dedication
For Steve Stout, my brother and the person I think of first when I think of strength of character
First words
Imagine--if you can--not having a conscience, none at all, no feelings of guilt or remorse no matter what you do, no limiting sense of concern for the well-being of strangers, friends or even family members.
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The conscience of a people is their power. - John Dryden
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Who is the devil you know?

Is it your lying, cheating ex-husband?
Your sadistic high school gym teacher?
Your boss who loves to humiliate people in meetings?
The colleague who stole your idea and passed it off as her own?

In the pages of The Sociopath Next Door, you will realize that your ex was not just misunderstood. He’s a sociopath. And your boss, teacher, and colleague? They may be sociopaths too.

We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in The Sociopath Next Door, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people—one in twenty-five—has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in twenty-five everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath. They could be your colleague, your neighbor, even family. And they can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.

How do we recognize the remorseless? One of their chief characteristics is a kind of glow or charisma that makes sociopaths more charming or interesting than the other people around them. They’re more spontaneous, more intense, more complex, or even sexier than everyone else, making them tricky to identify and leaving us easily seduced. Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others’ suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.

The fact is, we all almost certainly know at least one or more sociopaths already. Part of the urgency in reading The Sociopath Next Door is the moment when we suddenly recognize that someone we know—someone we worked for, or were involved with, or voted for—is a sociopath. But what do we do with that knowledge? To arm us against the sociopath, Dr. Stout teaches us to question authority, suspect flattery, and beware the pity play. Above all, she writes, when a sociopath is beckoning, do not join the game.

It is the ruthless versus the rest of us, and The Sociopath Next Door will show you how to recognize and defeat the devil you know.

Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0767915828, Paperback)

Who is the devil you know?

Is it your lying, cheating ex-husband?
Your sadistic high school gym teacher?
Your boss who loves to humiliate people in meetings?
The colleague who stole your idea and passed it off as her own?

In the pages of The Sociopath Next Door, you will realize that your ex was not just misunderstood. He’s a sociopath. And your boss, teacher, and colleague? They may be sociopaths too.

We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in The Sociopath Next Door, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people—one in twenty-five—has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in twenty-five everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath. They could be your colleague, your neighbor, even family. And they can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.

How do we recognize the remorseless? One of their chief characteristics is a kind of glow or charisma that makes sociopaths more charming or interesting than the other people around them. They’re more spontaneous, more intense, more complex, or even sexier than everyone else, making them tricky to identify and leaving us easily seduced. Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others’ suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.

The fact is, we all almost certainly know at least one or more sociopaths already. Part of the urgency in reading The Sociopath Next Door is the moment when we suddenly recognize that someone we know—someone we worked for, or were involved with, or voted for—is a sociopath. But what do we do with that knowledge? To arm us against the sociopath, Dr. Stout teaches us to question authority, suspect flattery, and beware the pity play. Above all, she writes, when a sociopath is beckoning, do not join the game.

It is the ruthless versus the rest of us, and The Sociopath Next Door will show you how to recognize and defeat the devil you know.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:37 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

[The author] reveals [in this book] that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people--one in twenty-five--has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse.... They can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.... Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others' suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.... To arm us against the sociopath, [the author] teaches us to question authority, suspect flattery, and beware the pity play. Above all, she writes, when a sociopath is beckoning, do not join the game. -BooksInPrint.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

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