HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Enrique's Journey by Sonia Nazario
Loading...

Enrique's Journey

by Sonia Nazario

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4941020,689 (3.78)24
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 24 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
rabck from Pam99; Heartbreaking. Originally a newpaper series, the author expanded her investigation and turned it into a book. She follows teenager, Enrique, on his journey as an illegal immigrant from Hondorus to America. A great deal of the journey was traveling through Mexico. His mother, left as a poor single parent of two young children by her philandering husband, left the children and made it to America. She believed at the time that it was the best thing for her family. But she never got ahead, and sending expensive presents and money to her relatives didn't make up for not being there. After reuniting with Enrique, nine years after she left, the relationship is broken almost beyond repair. Using their tale, the author explores the issue of why? The poverty, the breakdown of family in the country, the dislocation of the children as more and more mothers go north, and the crackdown on immigration, which makes it harder for the immigrants to slip back home & then north again all make it a no win situation. ( )
  nancynova | May 4, 2014 |
All she wanted was to be able to provide for her family. To be able to feed them and clothe them. To feel like a good mom. So she left Honduras and came to the United States to find a job so she could send money home to her kids and family. Lourdes is like so many mothers, wanting to provide a good life for her children, but unlike many mothers, she had to make the hard choice to leave her home country to make that happen. Her son Enrique was just five when she left, and when he turned 16, he decided to come to the United States to find his mother. His journey north would have discouraged most, but he stuck it out, even after being deported several times, being beaten to within an inch of his life, being robbed, being alone, and feeling rejected and hopeless. He persevered, much of the time with only a scrap of paper with a phone number written on it and the clothes on his back, in order to make it to the U.S. When he arrived and found his mother, the reunion was at first happy, then turned sour as Enrique's feelings of abandonment and rejection come to the surface. As Enrique and his mother figure out how to relate to one another again, they discover that being mother and son means more than being in the same country. ( )
  litgirl29 | Jan 1, 2014 |
The realization of immigration is well documented here with the horror of the immigrants who risk everything to come to the U.S. AND the problem those immigrants pose for the U.S. and its overburdened welfare and health care system. ( )
  creighley | Nov 5, 2010 |
This was a nonfiction book centered around a teenage Honduran boy trying to get to the US to find his mother who came 11 years before to try to earn money to support her starving children. After all that time in the US, she is still barely making a living while her children miss her terribly. It is amazing what he and other migrants go through to try to get over the border. ( )
  CatheOlson | Feb 21, 2010 |
I found this book for my neighborhood book club when it was my turn to choose, and I wanted to find something that would bring the nationwide immigration conversation "home" to us. It won the Pulitzer when it was first published as a series of of articles in the LA Times. An amazing true story of a reporter who retraces the journey of a Honduran boy to the U.S. in search of his mother, riding on the backs/sides/tops of trains. At times I cried at how people were treated - cried aloud while reading on a cross-country flight. At times it's too obvious to readers that the book was originally published as a series of articles (could have used a better editor). But I highly recommend it to better understand the human side of the immigration equation - regardless of how the politics pan out. ( )
  EatThaiAndRead | Jul 22, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812971787, Paperback)

In this astonishing true story, award-winning journalist Sonia Nazario recounts the unforgettable odyssey of a Honduran boy who braves unimaginable hardship and peril to reach his mother in the United States.
When Enrique is five years old, his mother, Lourdes, too poor to feed her children, leaves Honduras to work in the United States. The move allows her to send money back home to Enrique so he can eat better and go to school past the third grade.
Lourdes promises Enrique she will return quickly. But she struggles in America. Years pass. He begs for his mother to come back. Without her, he becomes lonely and troubled. When she calls, Lourdes tells him to be patient. Enrique despairs of ever seeing her again. After eleven years apart, he decides he will go find her.
Enrique sets off alone from Tegucigalpa, with little more than a slip of paper bearing his mother’s North Carolina telephone number. Without money, he will make the dangerous and illegal trek up the length of Mexico the only way he can–clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains.
With gritty determination and a deep longing to be by his mother’s side, Enrique travels through hostile, unknown worlds. Each step of the way through Mexico, he and other migrants, many of them children, are hunted like animals. Gangsters control the tops of the trains. Bandits rob and kill migrants up and down the tracks. Corrupt cops all along the route are out to fleece and deport them. To evade Mexican police and immigration authorities, they must jump onto and off the moving boxcars they call El Tren de la Muerte–The Train of Death. Enrique pushes forward using his wit, courage, and hope–and the kindness of strangers. It is an epic journey, one thousands of immigrant children make each year to find their mothers in the United States.
Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, Enrique’s Journey is the timeless story of families torn apart, the yearning to be together again, and a boy who will risk his life to find the mother he loves.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:43:14 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Based on the Los Angeles Times series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, this is a timeless story of families torn apart. When Enrique was five, his mother, too poor to feed her children, left Honduras to work in the United States. The move allowed her to send money back home so Enrique could eat better and go to school past the third grade. She promised she would return quickly, but she struggled in America. Without her, he became lonely and troubled. After eleven years, he decided he would go find her. He set off alone, with little more than a slip of paper bearing his mother's North Carolina telephone number. Without money, he made the dangerous trek up the length of Mexico, clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains. He and other migrants, many of them children, are hunted like animals. To evade bandits and authorities, they must jump onto and off the moving boxcars they call the Train of Death. It is an epic journey, one thousands of children make each year to find their mothers in the United States.--From publisher description.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
4 avail.
53 wanted
6 pay2 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.78)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 4
2.5 1
3 21
3.5 6
4 36
4.5 1
5 21

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,378,901 books! | Top bar: Always visible