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Enrique's Journey by Sonia Nazario
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Enrique's Journey

by Sonia Nazario

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Seeing that Rachel was reading this book, I went to look for my review and there wasn't any. I read this book about three years ago when it was the required reading for incoming freshmen at the Mount. I didn't think it was that great. I remember thinking it was good for the students to know this story, but the way that it was told made it very tedious reading. ( )
  TheresaCIncinnati | Aug 17, 2015 |
This book follows the journey of Enrique, a Honduran teenager who travels to the United States to be with his mother, who migrated to the United States when Enrique was five. Enrique travels through Mexico on the tops of trains, constantly dodging the dangers of Mexican police, gangsters, and immigration authorities.

The book deals with important issues, but it isn't a particularly good book. The present tense writing style was awkward and dull. Despite the horrific events the author tells about, it was difficult for me to empathize with the characters because the writing style failed to evoke any emotion. The writing was also repetitive. The author goes on for pages and pages about people being robbed, beaten, falling of the train, etc. I probably sound horribly cold-hearted, but by the end of it all, I found it hard to care. I would have preferred just to read the original articles the book was based upon. ( )
  klburnside | Aug 11, 2015 |
Really eye opening story. Because it was multiple newspaper articles first and then later published into a book, there are some repetitive parts and can be choppy, but acknowledging this as I read it seemed to help. A must read if you're interested in learning more about immigration law and what some immigrants go through. ( )
  ToriC90 | Aug 9, 2015 |
RGG: The adult version is incredibly detailed, but the individual specifics as well as the larger context of Enrique's experience are intense and compelling. The rambling of the story somewhat detracts, and points would have been clearer with editing although perhaps Nazario wanted to ensure the myriad of facts would bolster the truth of her telling. Reading Interest: YA-Adult.
  rgruberhighschool | May 12, 2015 |
RGG: The adult version is incredibly detailed, but the individual specifics as well as the larger context of Enrique's experience is intense and compelling. The rambling of the story somewhat detracts, and points would have been clearer with editing although perhaps Nazario wanted to ensure the myriad of facts would bolster the truth of her telling. Reading Interest: YA-Adult.
  rgruberexcel | May 12, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812971787, Paperback)

In this astonishing true story, award-winning journalist Sonia Nazario recounts the unforgettable odyssey of a Honduran boy who braves unimaginable hardship and peril to reach his mother in the United States.
When Enrique is five years old, his mother, Lourdes, too poor to feed her children, leaves Honduras to work in the United States. The move allows her to send money back home to Enrique so he can eat better and go to school past the third grade.
Lourdes promises Enrique she will return quickly. But she struggles in America. Years pass. He begs for his mother to come back. Without her, he becomes lonely and troubled. When she calls, Lourdes tells him to be patient. Enrique despairs of ever seeing her again. After eleven years apart, he decides he will go find her.
Enrique sets off alone from Tegucigalpa, with little more than a slip of paper bearing his mother’s North Carolina telephone number. Without money, he will make the dangerous and illegal trek up the length of Mexico the only way he can–clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains.
With gritty determination and a deep longing to be by his mother’s side, Enrique travels through hostile, unknown worlds. Each step of the way through Mexico, he and other migrants, many of them children, are hunted like animals. Gangsters control the tops of the trains. Bandits rob and kill migrants up and down the tracks. Corrupt cops all along the route are out to fleece and deport them. To evade Mexican police and immigration authorities, they must jump onto and off the moving boxcars they call El Tren de la Muerte–The Train of Death. Enrique pushes forward using his wit, courage, and hope–and the kindness of strangers. It is an epic journey, one thousands of immigrant children make each year to find their mothers in the United States.
Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, Enrique’s Journey is the timeless story of families torn apart, the yearning to be together again, and a boy who will risk his life to find the mother he loves.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:20 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Based on the Los Angeles Times series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, this is a timeless story of families torn apart. When Enrique was five, his mother, too poor to feed her children, left Honduras to work in the United States. The move allowed her to send money back home so Enrique could eat better and go to school past the third grade. She promised she would return quickly, but she struggled in America. Without her, he became lonely and troubled. After eleven years, he decided he would go find her. He set off alone, with little more than a slip of paper bearing his mother's North Carolina telephone number. Without money, he made the dangerous trek up the length of Mexico, clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains. He and other migrants, many of them children, are hunted like animals. To evade bandits and authorities, they must jump onto and off the moving boxcars they call the Train of Death. It is an epic journey, one thousands of children make each year to find their mothers in the United States.--From publisher description.… (more)

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