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Betsy-Tacy by Maud Hart Lovelace
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Betsy-Tacy (1940)

by Maud Hart Lovelace

Other authors: Lois Lenski (Illustrator)

Series: Betsy-Tacy (1)

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1,547386,884 (4.19)64
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» See also 64 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
I suspect I'm not the target market (currently 51, male) but I do read and love children's books--and I'm not simply re-reading favourites from my childhood, but also seeking out new stories, or old stories that I've missed. I had the great pleasure of reading The Wind in the Willows for the first time a few years ago. Now I turn to Betsy-Tacy, and while I can certainly see the appeal, it's no The Wind in the Willows.

What makes it so appealing to others is likely the very thing that's leaving me unimpressed: it's written in a very plain, simple language, as if a child could have written it. The events are by-and-large of no great import (they play in a box, they sit on a bench, etc.), and when something dramatic happens (a death in the family, for instance) it is of little consequence to our main characters, who are seeing the world through a five year old's eyes.

I would have preferred an actual memoir, recollections of growing up in a modest household in a small midwest town at the prior turn of the century. This was pleasant--it's the book equivalent of pudding--but not the kind of pudding one might rave to their friends about, and go to the restaurant just to order it. My tastes are more toward Edward Eager, for a charming portrayal of youth in earlier times (and the fact that his kids tend to stumble across magic devices and have more interesting adventures than standing on a porch or attending a party doesn't hurt!) ( )
  ashleytylerjohn | Sep 19, 2018 |
I enjoyed this more than I thought I would. As a child, I remember not caring for it, even though I grew up in Minnesota. I may have already been too advanced as a reader whereas if I had happened across it a couple of years earlier, I might have been entranced. As an adult, I find it a sweet story of two young girls having mild, realistic adventures and already, at the age of five, facing life's difficult times as well as the fun times. It is easy to see one's own childhood in their games and friendship and look back on it with nostalgia. Now I want to read more of the books. ( )
  PatsyMurray | Aug 28, 2018 |
I'm certain I would have loved this book as a younger reader. I really don't remember reading it although some of the plot elements seemed vaguely familiar to me. I'm certain not all of those would have been mentioned in reviews I read here, so I must have read it way back in the day. It's a delightful story about two girls who become best friends, share dreams, and help one another through difficult situations for young girls. I listened to the audio book which was wonderfully done with the exception of the annoying music at the beginning and end. ( )
  thornton37814 | Apr 26, 2018 |
The first of the Betsy-Tacy books, what I first heard about (like many of my generation, I'm guessing) when Kathleen Kelly recommended them to Joe Fox's aunt in You've Got Mail. A year or so ago I found a boxed set of the first four on the Friends of the Library shelf at the library for next to nothing, and I'm just now dipping in. This was too childish to be fully engaging to an adult first-time reader, but I definitely see the appeal as a chapter book for elementary school younguns. Will likely keep on through the rest of them, especially as I am interested to see how the children, and consequently the books, grow older with each installment. I think there are ten of these all together and by the end Betsy at least is married, so I suspect they may become more interesting to me as I go along. ( )
  lycomayflower | Sep 25, 2017 |
i like this book it is a good book about adventures read this book!
  azpandas | Aug 4, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Maud Hart Lovelaceprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lenski, LoisIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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It was difficult, later, to think of a time when Betsy and Tacy had not been friends.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0064400964, Paperback)

Best Friends Forever

There are lots of children on Hill Street, but no little girls Betsy's age. So when a new family moves into the house across the street, Betsy hopes they will have a little girl she can play with. Sure enough, they do—a little girl named Tacy. And from the moment they meet at Betsy's fifth birthday party, Betsy and Tacy becoms such good friends that everyone starts to think of them as one person—Betsy-Tacy.

Betsy and Tacy have lots of fun together. They make a playhouse from a piano box, have a sand store, and dress up and go calling. And one day, they come home to a wonderful surprise—a new friend named Tib.

Ever since their first publication in the 1940's, the Betsy-Tacy stories have been loved by each generation of young readers.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:45 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

After Tacy Kelly moves into the house across the street from Betsy Ray, the five-year-olds become inseparable friends.

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