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Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World…
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Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, Ptolemaic and Copernican,… (1638)

by Galileo Galilei, Galileo

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 3 mentions

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Believe it or not, I found this to be one of the most interesting books I have ever read. Easily understood, it is a seminal work in the history of science. Excellent. ( )
  JVioland | Jul 14, 2014 |
The classic that started modern science. Amazingly readable (unlike Newton's principia). The first popular science book!? ( )
  yapete | May 31, 2008 |
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» Add other authors (29 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Galileo Galileiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Galileomain authorall editionsconfirmed
Drake, StillmanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Flora, FerdinandoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 037575766X, Paperback)

Galileo’s Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, published in Florence in 1632, was the most proximate cause of his being brought to trial before the Inquisition. Using the dialogue form, a genre common in classical philosophical works, Galileo masterfully demonstrates the truth of the Copernican system over the Ptolemaic one, proving, for the first time, that the earth revolves around the sun. Its influence is incalculable. The Dialogue is not only one of the most important scientific treatises ever written, but a work of supreme clarity and accessibility, remaining as readable now as when it was first published. This edition uses the definitive text established by the University of California Press, in Stillman Drake’s translation, and includes a Foreword by Albert Einstein and a new Introduction by J. L. Heilbron.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:35 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, published in Florence in 1632, was the most proximate cause of his being brought to trial before the Inquisition. Using the dialogue form, a genre common in classical philosophical works, Galileo masterfully demonstrates the truth of the Copernicancan system over the Ptolemaic one, proving, for the first time, that the earth revolves around the Sun. It's influence is incalculable. The Dialogue is not only one of the most important scientific treatises ever written, but a work of supreme clarity and accessibility, remaining as readable now as when it was first published. This edition uses the definitive text established by the University of California Press, in Stillman Drake's translation, and includes a Foreword by Albert Einstein and a new Introduction by J.L. Heilbron.… (more)

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