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Dingoes at Dinnertime by Mary Pope Osborne
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Dingoes at Dinnertime (2000)

by Mary Pope Osborne

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1,530104,802 (3.58)3
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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
I had good feelings about this book after reading it. I liked this book because of the illustrations. Sometimes chapter books can be a bit boring to read but with these illustrations they definitely enhance the story a bit. The author doesn't include many illustrations but does include a few in between chapters. The illustrations highlight different aspects of the chapter. For example, in chapter 4 , Jack and Annie found a baby Kangaroo. The illustration shows Annie petting the Kangaroo while Jack looked up the baby Kangaroo in the Australia book that he had. The second thing that I liked about the book was the language and writing. The author uses many high level vocabulary words that lower grade level students wouldn't know but explains them through Jacks character. For example, Jack read about what "aborigines" were in his Australian book. The author includes a snippet of what the definition is and what how the Australian book defines it. Having a different font was also a great way for the author to distinguish that the information was coming from Jack's book.
Overall, this book is full of the adventure that Jack and Annie had when they end up in Australia. They learn a lot about the different Kangaroos and the environment of Australia. ( )
  Scrane4 | Apr 3, 2014 |
Read with Kaylee
  suziannabean | Apr 2, 2013 |
I picked this book up expecting to feel brain cells dying as I read it. I was very wrong; I can see why my students enjoy this series so much. It's very well written (albeit extremely simplistic) and interesting. It was an extremely quick read and is educational, to boot! ( )
  benuathanasia | Sep 5, 2012 |
This was our first Magic Tree House book. I chose it because many of my six year old's friends love the Magic Tree House series. Even though we started with a book from the middle of the series, we didn’t have any trouble following the story. There is a short recap of the previous books in the prologue of this book.

In Dingoes at Dinnertime, Annie and Jack head to Australia in search of a gift from a kangaroo. This book is packed with educational information about Australia and Australian animals. Whenever Jack and Annie encounter something new, Jack looks it up in a book and reads information about whatever it is out loud to Annie. I found this method of incorporating educational facts into the story really dry and boring but my sons (six and four years old) didn’t seem to mind. Because of that, I’ll try and let my son read the rest of the Magic Tree House books when he can read independently and try to find books for us to read together that we can both enjoy. ( )
  mcelhra | Dec 16, 2010 |
Very good book. Great for all elementary ages. This book is very educational but also easy to read. ( )
  ajryan | Jan 25, 2009 |
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For Ellen Mager, a great champion of children's literature
First words
Annie sat on the porch steps.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0679890661, Paperback)

"A feeling of dread came over Jack.

'What if...' he said. 'What if...'

In the distance, a tree suddenly burst into flames.

'We're looking at a wildfire!' he said."

On a magical mission from the mysterious tree house near their home in Frog Creek, Pennsylvania, Jack and his sister Annie find themselves in the wilds of Australia during a drought. Things heat up pretty quickly for this adventuresome pair, as what initially appears to be a campfire turns into something a lot more frightening. Meanwhile, one exotic animal after another crosses their paths, from koalas to kookaburras to kangaroos. In previous episodes of the Magic Tree House series, Jack and Annie found three of the four gifts they must receive in order to free an enchanted dog from a spell. Now they must track down "a gift from a kangaroo." But can they find this gift before the forest--and all its furry and feathered residents--burns up?

This enormously popular series by award-winning author Mary Pope Osborne is full of thrills and enchantment. She manages to infuse each easy-to-read chapter book with heaps of historical, cultural, and geographical information, without ever missing a beat. (Ages 6 to 10) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:35:29 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

The magic tree house whisks Jack and Annie away to Australia where they must save some animals from a wildfire.

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