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As I Lay Dying (Vintage International) by…
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As I Lay Dying (Vintage International) (original 1930; edition 2011)

by William Faulkner (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
12,422180345 (3.89)571
One of William Faulkner's finest novels, "As I lay dying" was originally published in 1930, and remains a captivating and stylistically innovative work. The story revolves around a grim yet darkly humorous pilgrimage, as Addie Bundren's family sets out to fulfill her last wish: to be buried in her native Jefferson, Mississippi, far from the miserable backwater surroundings of her married life. Told through multiple voices, it vividly brings to life Faulkner's imaginary South, one of the great invented landscapes in all of literature, and is replete with the poignant, impoverished, violent, and hypnotically fascinating characters that were his trademark.… (more)
Member:Dydee
Title:As I Lay Dying (Vintage International)
Authors:William Faulkner (Author)
Info:Vintage (2011), Edition: Reissue, 117 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
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Work details

As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner (1930)

  1. 60
    Wise Blood by Flannery O'Connor (joririchardson)
  2. 71
    The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (2below)
    2below: Both involve complicated characters (some might say messed up), crazy mishaps, and fascinating unstable and unreliable narratives. Also excellent examples of Modernist fiction.
  3. 30
    Getting Mother's Body by Suzan-Lori Parks (aethercowboy)
    aethercowboy: Getting Mother's Body is a reimagining of As I Lay Dying through a different culture's point of view.
  4. 20
    The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy (SanctiSpiritus)
  5. 20
    A Death in the Family by James Agee (goodwinter)
  6. 21
    Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward (LottaBerling)
  7. 00
    Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (CGlanovsky)
  8. 00
    Pélagie: The Return to Acadie by Antonine Maillet (Serviette, Serviette)
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» See also 571 mentions

English (168)  Spanish (4)  French (2)  Italian (1)  Portuguese (1)  Catalan (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (178)
Showing 1-5 of 168 (next | show all)
"It is dark. I can hear wood, silence: I know them. But not living sounds, not even him. It is as though the dark were resolving him out of his integrity, into an unrelated scattering of components—snuffings and stampings; smells of his colling flesh and ammoniac hair; an illusion of a coordinated whole of splotched hide and strong bones within which, detached and secret and familiar, an is different from my is. I see him dissolve—legs, a rolling eye, a gaudy splotching like cold flames—and float upon the dark in fading solution; all one yet neither; all either yet none. I can see hearing coil toward him, caressing, shaping his hard shape—fetlock, hip, shoulder and head; smell and sound. I am not afraid" (56-57). ( )
  melanierisch | Oct 25, 2020 |
Update: Upon re-read, this novel is so much better and so much more powerful than before. Faulkner definitely bears re-reading.

LOVE. I need to reread this, it's so powerful and so, so complicated. ( )
  askannakarenina | Sep 16, 2020 |
Update: Upon re-read, this novel is so much better and so much more powerful than before. Faulkner definitely bears re-reading.

LOVE. I need to reread this, it's so powerful and so, so complicated. ( )
  askannakarenina | Sep 16, 2020 |
Update: Upon re-read, this novel is so much better and so much more powerful than before. Faulkner definitely bears re-reading.

LOVE. I need to reread this, it's so powerful and so, so complicated. ( )
  askannakarenina | Sep 16, 2020 |
Update: Upon re-read, this novel is so much better and so much more powerful than before. Faulkner definitely bears re-reading.

LOVE. I need to reread this, it's so powerful and so, so complicated. ( )
  askannakarenina | Sep 16, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 168 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (55 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
William Faulknerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Prins, ApieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Raver, LornaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vandenbergh, JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verhoef, RienTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Hal Smith
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Jewel and I come up from the field, following the path in single file.
Quotations
"She's a-going," he says. "Her mind is set on it."
Sometimes I aint so sho who's got ere a right to say when a man is crazy and when he aint. Sometimes I think it aint none of us pure crazy and aint none of us pure sane until the balance of us talks him that-a-way. It's like it aint so much what a fellow does, but it's the way the majority of folks is looking at him when he does it.
My mother is a fish.
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One of William Faulkner's finest novels, "As I lay dying" was originally published in 1930, and remains a captivating and stylistically innovative work. The story revolves around a grim yet darkly humorous pilgrimage, as Addie Bundren's family sets out to fulfill her last wish: to be buried in her native Jefferson, Mississippi, far from the miserable backwater surroundings of her married life. Told through multiple voices, it vividly brings to life Faulkner's imaginary South, one of the great invented landscapes in all of literature, and is replete with the poignant, impoverished, violent, and hypnotically fascinating characters that were his trademark.

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