HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Have you checked out SantaThing, LibraryThing's gift-giving tradition?
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Postsingular

by Rudy Rucker

Series: Postsingular (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3151460,845 (3.47)6
It begins the day after next year in California. A maladjusted computer industry billionaire and a somewhat crazy US president initiate a radical transformation of the world through sentient nanotechnology; sort of the equivalent of biological artificial intelligence. At first they succeed, but their plans are reversed by Chu, an autistic boy. The next time it isn't so easy to stop them. Most of the story takes place in our world after a previously unimaginable transformation. All things look the same, and all people feel the same--but they are different (they're able to read each others' minds, for starters). Travel to and from other nearby worlds in the quantum universe is possible. And our world is visited by giant humanoids from another quantum universe, some of whom mean to tidy up the mess we've made. Or maybe just run things.… (more)
  1. 00
    Hylozoic by Rudy Rucker (arcanacoelestia)
    arcanacoelestia: Postsingular and Hylozoic, in that order, are a duology.
  2. 00
    All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders (hairball)
    hairball: All the Birds in the Sky made me think about Postsingular and Hylozoic for some reason--maybe it's the Bay Area thing, but it's also something about the attitude.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
A delicious and gnarly read. If you always wanted to know what upbeat, positive and yet very trippy sci-fi reads like, this is a good start into Rudy Rucker's work. ( )
  psyq123 | Aug 24, 2020 |
Rudy Rucker is a real mind bender. It's hard to see how he can write any weirder stuff than this, but I am sure he will think of a way. Way out fantasy scifi fun. ( )
  ndpmcIntosh | Mar 21, 2016 |
Rudy Rucker takes on the AI singularity with his typical combination of hippie trippiness and gonzo mathematics. Not his best work, but a fun read. Warning: reading just before bed may induce crazy tangled quantum multidimensional dreams. Or maybe that was just me. ( )
  wirehead | Jul 9, 2013 |
Rudy Rucker again takes us on a wild ride while exploring some important concepts like the fundamental nature of the universe and the difference between virtual reality and physical reality. This is a great read, lots of fun, and at heart a thought experiment. ( )
  nmele | Apr 6, 2013 |
Rudy Rucker starts a reported trilogy with a book about nanotechnology remaking the world, and the consciousness of the world's inhabitants right along with it.

In fact, the world is remade at least twice in the book, first in a freak experiment, and then in a phreakier one. The law of unintended consequences is the law of the land in Rucker's re-re-imagined Earth, where a global, semi-organic network of sentient helper tech grants everyone a form of omniscience, and taps into other dimensions.

True to human nature, these newfound abilities and insights lead to nothing so much as more of the same. Like Warren Ellis's Transmetropolitan comic series, Rucker's novel is formulated on the thesis that technological improvements lead not necessarily to an improved society, but to one in which the same faults and foibles, lusts and needs, are magnified. It's told with constant humor, endless goofy neologisms, and Rucker's trademark sense of calm despite the waves of societal and technological change.
  Disquiet | Mar 30, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Georgia, Rudy, and Isabel
First words
Two boys walked down the beach, deep in conversation.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

It begins the day after next year in California. A maladjusted computer industry billionaire and a somewhat crazy US president initiate a radical transformation of the world through sentient nanotechnology; sort of the equivalent of biological artificial intelligence. At first they succeed, but their plans are reversed by Chu, an autistic boy. The next time it isn't so easy to stop them. Most of the story takes place in our world after a previously unimaginable transformation. All things look the same, and all people feel the same--but they are different (they're able to read each others' minds, for starters). Travel to and from other nearby worlds in the quantum universe is possible. And our world is visited by giant humanoids from another quantum universe, some of whom mean to tidy up the mess we've made. Or maybe just run things.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.47)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5 1
2 5
2.5
3 18
3.5 9
4 27
4.5 3
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 152,532,778 books! | Top bar: Always visible