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The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
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The Jungle (1906)

by Upton Sinclair

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
8,65197539 (3.81)1 / 367
  1. 60
    The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (kxlly)
  2. 30
    Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell (meggyweg)
  3. 10
    The Tortilla Curtain by T. Coraghessan Boyle (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Theme of workers' rights
  4. 10
    For the Win by Cory Doctorow (weener)
    weener: For the Win is kind of like a modern-day version of the Jungle: a heavy-handed, painful, yet readable book about labor rights.
  5. 10
    The Death Ship by B. Traven (owishlist2)
  6. 10
    The People of the Abyss by Jack London (meggyweg)
  7. 00
    Yonnondio by Tillie Olsen (quilted_kat)
  8. 11
    Independent People by Halldor Laxness (rwjerome)
    rwjerome: These books share surprisingly similar main characters who both experience extreme misfortune. Interestingly enough, both books also showcase slightly misplaced political overtones.
  9. 12
    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition, and Health by Marion Nestle (starboard)
    starboard: If you are interested in the non-fiction current state of food science and regulation, read Marion Nestle's books. She writes well and is not overly technical.
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English (96)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (97)
Showing 1-5 of 96 (next | show all)
First novel that I ever read...Rollins College, 1963 ( )
  Brightman | Mar 3, 2018 |
Wow. This book had some really fucked up passages about the conditions that poor people, especially immigrants, had to deal with. Some of them hurt my heart to read.

The passages about Jurgis and his family dealing with the winters and the struggles of the house and the hidden contract clauses hit the hardest for me.

Jurgis's struggles really yanked on the heart strings.

I knocked the rating down a few stars because I felt that, especially towards the end, the speeches went on for too long and had nothing to do with the story (though they weren't totally unrelated). The ending itself also just seemed to happen suddenly and we got no hint of a conclusion. ( )
  Moore31 | Feb 25, 2018 |
Wow. This book had some really fucked up passages about the conditions that poor people, especially immigrants, had to deal with. Some of them hurt my heart to read.

The passages about Jurgis and his family dealing with the winters and the struggles of the house and the hidden contract clauses hit the hardest for me.

Jurgis's struggles really yanked on the heart strings.

I knocked the rating down a few stars because I felt that, especially towards the end, the speeches went on for too long and had nothing to do with the story (though they weren't totally unrelated). The ending itself also just seemed to happen suddenly and we got no hint of a conclusion. ( )
  Moore31 | Feb 25, 2018 |
My original GR review (Apr 27 2009):
- Cynical, emotional story, no doubt a story of conviction. But it becomes too much a manifesto of sorts which kind of botches the whole experience for me. Still, an important and far-reaching novel in its time. ( )
1 vote ThoughtPolice | Jan 28, 2018 |
Welp, that was cheerful.
The story follows an immigrant man and his family trying to survive in the packing district of turn-of-the-century Chicago, and details the corruption and filth of the packing companies and the devastating lives the workers led. Fascinating and horrible. And important. And not, horrifyingly, without certain relevancies today. My one quibble: the ending gets bogged down in a description of socialism and then ends much too abruptly. Otherwise, a solid - if not happy - read. ( )
1 vote electrascaife | Nov 6, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 96 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (61 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Upton Sinclairprimary authorall editionscalculated
Boomsma, GraaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dickstein, MorrisIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kagie, RudieAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spiegel, MauraIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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People/Characters
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Epigraph
Dedication
To the workingmen of America
First words
It was four o'clock when the ceremony was over and the carriages began to arrive.
Quotations
Into this wild-beast tangle these men had been born without their consent, they had taken part in it because they could not help it; that they were in gaol was no disgrace to them, for the game had never been fair, the dice were loaded.  They were swindlers and thieves of pennies and dimes, and they had been trapped and put out of the way by the swindlers and thieves of millions of dollars.
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Disambiguation notice
This book was written by Upton Sinclair, not Sinclair Lewis. To have your book show up on the correct author page, please change the author name. Thank you.
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Book description
In 1906, The Jungle was published and became an immediate success, selling more than 150,000 copies. A best seller overseas, it was published in 17 languages over the next few years. After President Theodore Roosevelt read Jungle, he ordered an investigation into the meat packing industry, and ultimately the passing of the Meat Inspection Act was a result of Sinclair’s book.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743487621, Mass Market Paperback)

ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED

BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

Upton Sinclair's unflinching chronicle of crushing poverty and oppression set in Chicago in the early 1900s.

EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:

• A concise introduction that gives readers important background information

• A chronology of the author's life and work

• A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context

• An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations

• Detailed explanatory notes

• Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work

• Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction

• A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.

SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:18 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Describes the conditions of the Chicago stockyards through the eyes of a young immigrant struggling in America.

» see all 39 descriptions

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An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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