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Memnoch, the Devil (Vampire Chronicles 05) (original 1995; edition 2010)

by Anne Rice

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5,97447699 (3.5)56
Member:heleri1605
Title:Memnoch, the Devil (Vampire Chronicles 05)
Authors:Anne Rice
Info:Arrow Books (2010), Paperback, 416 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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Memnoch the Devil by Anne Rice (1995)

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Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
This book blew me away. It's different from her other books. Not bad different or good different. Just different. It is an entirely different KIND of book than the rest of the series has been so far. I loved it. It was powerful, thought provoking, inspiring. Just plain incredible. ( )
  KRaySaulis | Aug 13, 2014 |
Memnoch the Devil takes Lestat on an extremely long tour of the past, creation, angels, evolution, the passion of Christ and more – because he has a job proposition for the Brat Prince

Memnoch the Devil, also known as “the Bible according to Anne Rice” or “Anne Rice’s theological musings”. Perhaps even “Memnoch lectures you endlessly while Lestat practices his melodrama”.

What it isn’t, is much of a story or a plot. For a story or a plot to happen, well, things have to happen. Things do not happen. Oh there’s something tucked at the beginning. There’s something tucked at the end (a teeny tiny something). But that’s it

The rest of lecture. Info-dump. ONE LONG INFODUMP! One horrendously long, unbelievably unnecessary info-dump. An info-dump that I cannot even imagine having even the slightest relevance to the series. It really is just one long exposition on what the Bible could mean or a spin on it or on the nature of god. It’s a vast amount of world building that is utterly irrelevant to anything the vampires do in their daily lives

If Lestat weren’t being dragged around to occasionally declare himself impressed/awed/horrified it wouldn’t be relevant at all. The vampires are utterly superfluous to this story. All of the characters are utterly superfluous to this story. It may as well have been one long the logical lecture – inly told in the most long winded, dullest way possible.

I’d like to write more on this since it is the vast majority of the book, but there really is nothing more to say. It’s just a big splurge of theological theory pretending to be a novel. It’s completely irrelevant, not very interesting and probably better suited to analysis in a seminary than actually read as a novel in the ongoing vampire series.

But looking at the bits that actually involve the vampires rather than some of the dreariest and long winded exposition I have ever had the displeasure to ready, and it’s not much better or more sensible. Perhaps because these little add ons have just been forced to try and drag this info dump into her world

Lestat fell in love with his victim – I can buy that’s imply because within 10 seconds of meeting just about anyone, Lestat falls in love with them. It’s what he does, it allows even more pointless melodrama. So we get a really long and pointless backstory on this man and some books he read (which seem to be more part of the endless theological debate that basically comes down to “sex and pleasure and love are not bad things. Suffering is not valuable.” Seriously, that’s this entire damn theological diatribe that took an entire book to relate summed up in one sentence) which is never gain relevant. This goes on for countless pointless pages where we learn the pointless minutiae of someone who DOES NOT MATTER

Aaargh, this is something I’ve seen in Anne Rice’s novels time and again - especially n Queen of the Damned and The Witching Hour - every character briefly mentioned will get this endless examination of their lives. We do not need this much detail about every irrelevant side character

And there’s Dora, I’m going to leave aside the bizarre menstruation feeding, and just ask what is wrong with this woman?! Lestat comes to her having killed her dad and she starts calling him darling? Where did darling come from? What? Why?! And she goes from not caring about relics because they’re just physical objects and faith comes from within, to being completely enraptured and obsessive about... a relic. Her characterisation didn’t even begin to make sense

We do have the “everyone is bisexual” continuation – since even Lestat’s victims were. But it’s, again, not conveyed well. For a start the whole religious monologue that consumes this book puts the love for men and women as a dramatic holy amazing experience – and it’s always men and women. The divine heterosexual is really strong there.

And his new bisexual victim, Roger, slept with women and… boys? Why are we expressly saying “boys” there? And the only partner we learn any detail about is, of course, a woman – which is very reminiscent of the same problems in The Tale of the Body Thief

Read More ( )
1 vote FangsfortheFantasy | Jul 25, 2014 |
This is the 5th of the Vampire Chronicles, and while it was an interesting storyline, I didn't particularly like the way it fit into the series...or didn't fit.

Obviously I'm not the author, and so perhaps reading the rest of the series (and then some of the companion series as well), I will gain a better perspective.

But to give a little more of the story of the novel, it starts the way several Chronicle books do--Lestat is getting into trouble. He's been stalking a man he is obsessed (and in love) with. Sounds normal so far, until he meets up with his recent-convert David to tell him he thinks he is being stalked...by something terrifying. He kills the man he has been lusting after, only to be visited by his ghost, who implores him to care for his daughter.

Had the storyline stayed here, I think it would have been a fantastic tale...but the story shifted to that of God, Devil, Hell, Heaven. And it was an interesting and well-told novel, but not quite the novel I expected when I picked it up. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
This is the 5th of the Vampire Chronicles, and while it was an interesting storyline, I didn't particularly like the way it fit into the series...or didn't fit.

Obviously I'm not the author, and so perhaps reading the rest of the series (and then some of the companion series as well), I will gain a better perspective.

But to give a little more of the story of the novel, it starts the way several Chronicle books do--Lestat is getting into trouble. He's been stalking a man he is obsessed (and in love) with. Sounds normal so far, until he meets up with his recent-convert David to tell him he thinks he is being stalked...by something terrifying. He kills the man he has been lusting after, only to be visited by his ghost, who implores him to care for his daughter.

Had the storyline stayed here, I think it would have been a fantastic tale...but the story shifted to that of God, Devil, Hell, Heaven. And it was an interesting and well-told novel, but not quite the novel I expected when I picked it up. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
Thank God!!!!! I made it through this book! ( )
  Dbookwhore | Mar 30, 2013 |
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Epigraph
What God Did Not Plan On. Sleep well, Weep well, Go to the deep well As often as possible. Bring back the water, Jostling and gleaming. God did not plan on consciousness Developing so Well. Well, Tell Him our Pail is full And He can Go to Hell. Stan Rice 24 June 93
The Offering. To the somethingness Which prevents the nothingness Like Homer's wild boar From thrashing this way and that Its white tusks Through human beings like crackling stalks And to nothing less I offer this suffering of my father. Stan Rice 16 Oct 93
Dedication
For Stan Rice, Christopher Rice and Michele Rice. For John Preston. For Howard and Katherine Allen O'Brien. For Katherine's brother John Allen, Uncle Mickey and for Uncle Mickey's son, Jack Allen, and all the descendants of Jack. And for Uncle Marian Leslie, who was in Corona's Bar on that night. With live for you and for all our kith and kin this book is dedicated
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Lestat Here.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0345409671, Mass Market Paperback)

The fifth volume of Rice's Vampire Chronicles is one of her most controversial books. The tale begins in New York, where Lestat, the coolest of Rice's vampire heroes, is stalking a big-time cocaine dealer and religious-art smuggler--this guy should get it in the neck. Lestat is also growing fascinated with the dealer's lovely daughter, a TV evangelist who's not a fraud.

Lestat is also being stalked himself, by some shadowy guy who turns out to be Memnoch, the devil, who spirits him away. From here on, the book might have been called Interview with the Devil (by a Vampire). It's a rousing story interrupted by a long debate with the devil. Memnoch isn't the devil as ordinarily conceived: he got the boot from God because he objected to God's heartless indifference to human misery. Memnoch takes Lestat to heaven, hell, and throughout history.

Some readers are appalled by the scene in which Lestat sinks his fangs into the throat of Christ on the cross, but the scene is not a mere shock tactic: Jesus is giving Lestat a bloody taste in order to win him over to God's side, and Rice is dead serious about the battle for his soul. Rice is really doing what she did as a devout young Catholic girl asked to imagine in detail what Christ's suffering felt like--it's just that her imagination ran away with her.

If you like straight-ahead fanged adventure, you'll likely enjoy the first third; if you like Job-like arguments with God, you'll prefer the Memnoch chapters. --Tim Appelo

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:21:20 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

In Anne Rice's extraordinary fifth novel of "The Vampire Chronicles", irresistible antihero Lestat encounters his most dangerous adversary--the mysterious being Memnoch, who claims to be the Devil. Ushered through the realms of Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell, Lestat must finally decide if he can believe in the Devil or God--and which, if either, he will serve.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

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