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All the Clean Ones Are Married: And Other…
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All the Clean Ones Are Married: And Other Everyday Calamities in Moscow

by Lori Cidylo

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This is a short, charming, and insightful book outlining an American journalist's time spent living in Moscow in the 1990s. Russian culture is what is mainly discussed, but the political and economic climate is also touched upon - rightly so considering the climate during that time period.

I loved Lori Cidylo's anecdotes, which were very often funny but also very telling about certain aspects of the Russian character and of life in Russia. As someone who has spent some time in Russia in more recent years, I often smiled in agreement when reading about some stranger aspects of Russian culture. What I appreciated most about these acknowledgements about the curious elements of Russian life was that she made an effort to explain why and how they came about. Thus, through reading the book you not only learn how the Russians were during this time, but how they got that way.

This is a fast, but very fun read that I would highly recommend for anyone who is fascinated by the Russians. ( )
  abookolive | Jul 27, 2013 |
Lori Cidylo will be making a new book soon about her life after Russia with her Ukrainian family. feel free to message me with questions for her as i have insider acess and can ask her your questions and get replies. ( )
  jhuzz | Feb 10, 2011 |
A really entertaining chronicle of life in Moscow after the political upheaval. Cidylo is a great storyteller, and provides really entertaining stories that highlight the joys and frustrations of everyday life in Moscow during the 1990s. The dating stories especially are extremely funny, as you can probably tell by the title. Definitely check this out if you have an interest in everyday life and Russia. ( )
  Oreillynsf | Apr 5, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0897335015, Hardcover)

In 1991, Lori Cidylo shocked her Ukrainian Polish-born parents when she told them she was leaving her reporter’s job on an upstate New York newspaper to live and work in the rapidly dissolving Soviet Union.

For six years she lived on a shoe-string budget in Moscow, in tiny, run-down apartments, struggling with broken toilets and indifferent landlords and coping with the daily calamities of life in Russia. Fluent in Russian, she rode on public transportation, did her own shopping and cooking, and shared the typical Muscovite’s life—unlike most Westerners who were still sequestered in the heavily guarded compounds reserved for diplomats and journalists. As the country experienced its most dramatic transformation since the Bolshevik Revolution, she realized she had stepped into a fantastical and absurd adventure.

Cidylo’s wry, insightful account of what it is like for an American woman living in Russia is a dramatic tale full of insouciant laughter, in which the immediate sense of vivid experience shines on every page. With the sharp eye of an acute observer, she captures the momentous events no less than the everyday trivia: how do Russians address one another now that the familiar "comrade" is passé; or how do you find your way home in a city where the streets keep getting new names? As Russia even now continues to struggle with the Cold War’s aftermath, Cidylo gives a delightful, surprising, warmly human view of post-Soviet life.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:36 -0400)

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