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The Armageddon Rag by George R. R. Martin
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The Armageddon Rag (1983)

by George R. R. Martin

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Not his best work. The short stories I've read have been better written. Follows an underground journalist turned novelist investigating the death of notorious band manager of a Led Zeppelin-like band called the Nazgul. In search of the murderer the main character, Sandy, meets up with his old friends from college as they wonder what happened to the spirit of the 60s.
The Nazgul, despite the dramatic death of the front man in '71, are reformed for a reunion tour. The reunion is the idea of a mysterious and possibly evil man named Edan Morse.
The development of the band's mythology throughout the book was interesting. I didn't feel like the climax of the book really delivered. The book was pretty good, but not as good a Fevre Dream or his short stories (I've yet to read Game of Thrones). I would recommend this book to George Martin fans or those interested in the 60s. ( )
  cblaker | Apr 22, 2014 |
I'm calling this book fantasy, but it skimmed very close to horror for me. So, dark fantasy, I guess. This is about a counterculture-journalist-turned-novelist who has lost his way from his 1960s idealism. He ends up investigating the ritualistic murder of a music promoter who controlled a now-split-up band called the Nazgul. This band was on its way to being as big as the Beatles or the Rolling Stones when the lead singer was assassinated during a concert; now somebody wants to get them together again for sinister purposes.

The book was interesting, and I definitely wanted to find out what happened, but there was so much speechifying between characters arguing about the most effective way to achieve their ideals. It was also pretty hard to find a sympathetic character. The protagonist wasn't a terrible person by any means, but I found him pretty hard to warm up to, and the rest of the "lead" characters.... well, it was hard to care about them much.

Also there were way too many dream sequences, although to be fair they were part of the plot. And I felt as though the book was about 80 pages too long.

I'm not sorry I read it -- it certainly was well-written for the most part -- but it's not something I would read again. ( )
1 vote amysisson | Feb 16, 2014 |
I didn't think this was a book for me. Growing up in the hippie era, American sixties politics and midlife crises are not things that I can really relate to since I grew up in eighties Sweden. Yet this book is as mesmerizing, well written and hard to put down as other GRRM books I've read. Well done.
( )
  MickeNimell | Aug 24, 2013 |
Flabby. I figured out what what was going on pretty soon, and then waded through slow, wordy exposition to get there.
  mulliner | Feb 9, 2012 |
This is a novel of a sixties refugee in the early eighties, when all the hopes of peace and love and change have been turned into Yuppiedom, real estate agents and ad executives. A journalist-turned-novelist, called in to investigate the death of a music promoter, journeys into his past and finds, in the attempted resurrection of a Doors-like rock band (the Nazgûl, with tons of Tolkien references), both a window into his own history and perhaps a dangerous door into another world. Very much of its time, and not just because people can only find information by making phone calls and driving across the country. It’s a cry of sadness that the sixties ended from someone who did very well thereafter; make of that what you will. ( )
  rivkat | May 1, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
George R. R. Martinprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Charles, MiltonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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It was not one of Sandy Blair's all-time great days.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553383078, Paperback)

“The best novel concerning the American pop music culture of the sixties I’ve ever read.”—Stephen King
 
From #1 New York Times bestselling author George R. R. Martin comes the ultimate novel of revolution, rock ’n’ roll, and apocalyptic murder—a stunning work of fiction that portrays not just the end of an era, but the end of the world as we know it.
 
Onetime underground journalist Sandy Blair has come a long way from his radical roots in the ’60s—until something unexpectedly draws him back: the bizarre and brutal murder of a rock promoter who made millions with a band called the Nazgûl. Now, as Sandy sets out to investigate the crime, he finds himself drawn back into his own past—a magical mystery tour of the pent-up passions of his generation. For a new messiah has resurrected the Nazgûl and the mad new rhythm may be more than anyone bargained for—a requiem of demonism, mind control, and death, whose apocalyptic tune only Sandy may be able to change in time . . . before everyone follows the beat.
 
“The wilder aspects of the ’60s . . . roar back to life in this hallucinatory story by a master of chilling suspense.”—Publishers Weekly
 
“What a story, full of nostalgia and endless excitement. . . . It’s taut, tense, and moves like lightning.”—Tony Hillerman
 
“Daring . . . a knowing, wistful appraisal of . . . a crucial American generation.”—Chicago Sun-Times
 
“Moving . . . comic . . . eerie . . . really and truly a walk down memory lane.”—The Washington Post

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:29:52 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

One-time underground journalist Sandy Blair has come a long way from his radical roots in the '60s--until something unexpectedly draws him back: the bizarre and brutal murder of a rock promoter who made millions with the '60s band the Nazgûl. Now, as Sandy sets out to investigate the crime, he finds himself drawn back into his own past--a magical mystery tour of the pent-up passions of his generation. For a new messiah has resurrected the Nazgûl and the mad new beat may be more than anyone bargained for--a requiem of demonism, mind control, and death, whose apocalyptic tune only Sandy may be able to change in time.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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