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Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
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Gone With the Wind (1936)

by Margaret Mitchell

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14,414275139 (4.36)903
19th century (77) 20th century (99) America (77) American (138) American Civil War (186) American literature (187) American South (87) Atlanta (74) Civil War (829) classic (494) classics (326) fiction (1,632) Georgia (156) historical (184) historical fiction (733) history (75) literature (147) love (91) novel (207) own (90) Pulitzer Prize (106) read (194) romance (527) slavery (137) South (133) southern (112) to-read (228) unread (71) USA (90) war (138)
  1. 60
    Forever Amber by Kathleen Winsor (avalon_today)
    avalon_today: They are both scandalous women. It’s a love hate relationship.
  2. 60
    The Wind Done Gone: A Novel by Alice Randall (lquilter, petersonvl)
    lquilter: This work was rewritten to tell the other side of Gone With the Wind, the story that Mitchell elided with her romanticized view of racism and slavery and its "happier when they were slaves" survivors. The Mitchell estate chose to sue for copyright infringement, but lost because the court recognized that this work is an important critical commentary on Gone with the Wind, and the beliefs that animated the original.… (more)
  3. 20
    Oh, Kentucky! by Betty Layman Receveur (blonderedhead)
    blonderedhead: Strong female heroine in a sweeping, romantic and exciting historical fiction novel. I loved both books...and think others might, too.
  4. 20
    Jubilee by Margaret Walker (lquilter)
    lquilter: Jubilee is the true story of the author's great grandmother, a woman born to slavery as the daughter of a slave and a white slave-owner. She acted as servant to her white sister, and was a witness to antebellum life, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
  5. 10
    War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy (GCPLreader)
    GCPLreader: melodrama in the midst of war and the invasion (and burning!) of a major city
  6. 10
    The Legacy by Katherine Webb (tesskrose)
  7. 21
    A Skeptic's Luck by A.D. Morel (A.D.Morel)
    A.D.Morel: There's this feeling of longing, that she will not quite get there, yet we are passionately rooting for the main character, we go through her travails with her.
  8. 10
    The Wind Is Never Gone: Sequels, Parodies and Rewritings of Gone with the Wind by M. Carmen Gomez-galisteo (Prinzipessa, Prinzipessa)
    Prinzipessa: This book explains Gone with the Wind and analyzes its sequels, parodies as well as the fan fiction stories based on Gone With the Wind.
  9. 00
    The Winds of Tara: The Saga Lives On by Katherine Pinotti (veracity)
    veracity: 'Winds of Tara' is an unauthorised sequel to 'Gone with the Wind'.
  10. 00
    Heart of the West by Penelope Williamson (theshadowknows)
    theshadowknows: These books share a similar epic, sweeping feel in bringing to life a lost and fading ideal (the American frontier in Heart of the West and the old, genteel south in Gone with the Wind.)
  11. 12
    My Name is Mary Sutter by Robin Oliveira (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  12. 12
    Katherine by Anya Seton (avalon_today)
    avalon_today: Its about having to deal with a very strong, charismatic man. *Sigh*
  13. 12
    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (StarryNightElf)
  14. 03
    Rhett Butler's People by Donald McCaig (mrstreme)
  15. 48
    Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind by Alexandra Ripley (Nyxn)
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» See also 903 mentions

English (268)  Spanish (2)  Italian (1)  Danish (1)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (274)
Showing 1-5 of 268 (next | show all)
I do feel Johnny-come-lately recommending this book. Everybody knows the movie, but have they read the book?? And so many have.

I read the book first, and *then* saw the movie. I think GWTW is one of the best books ever written: not so much because of the great love story, but because Margaret Mitchell portrayed history about as well as anyone I have ever read. She does not top Edward Gibbon in the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, but Mitchell certainly tells her story in a fantastically interesting way. Plus you don't have to feel all snooty telling people you are reading GWTW, like you would with Decline and Fall!

She showed the foolishness of the South to go to war, but also the brutality of the North. I think readers often miss the astonishing portrayal of the Civil War. Even all that aside, Mitchell portrayed each possible viewpoint of the South of various groups, social levels and individuals among these groups.

For me it was a fabulous and exciting love story and history lesson.

I listened to the whole book on my iPod downloaded from Audible.com. This was a tremendous "read" by the narrator.

Lastly, I am still trying to revamp my view of Abraham Lincoln (in a nice way, of course). But NO, the Civil War should not have been fought. ( )
  Benedict8 | Jul 16, 2014 |
Comencé este libro cuatro veces, sin lograr pasar mas allá de las primeras paginas, hasta que me decidí a hacer el esfuerzo y leerlo completo. No me arrepiento.

¿Como no amar una historia así?:

Scarlett: Soy la más bella. Todos los hombres del condado me aman. Todos menos Ashley, y yo amo es a Ashley.

Ashley: Si te amo.

Scarlett: Casémonos entonces.

Ashley: No puedo, debo casarme con mi prima Melanie. No la amo pero en mi familia siempre nos casamos entre primos. Tenemos una reputación de aspecto enfermo que defender.

Scarlett: Te odio Ashley Wilkes. Largate.

Rhett: Hola. Escuche todo. Te estoy imaginando desnuda. Nunca me casaría contigo pero ¿quieres ser mi amante?

Scarlett: Te odio Rhett Butler. Largate.



Scarlett se casa con Charles.

Comienza la guerra.

Charles muere.

Scarlett pasa hambre.



Scarlett: Juro que nunca más volveré a pasar hambre. Le robaré el novio millonario a mi hermana y me casaré yo con el.

Scarlett se casa con Frank.

Frank muere.



Scarlett: Ashley te amo. Abandona a Melanie. Huyamos.

Ashley: También te amo. Nunca podré abandonar a Melanie, soy un cobarde.

Scarlett: Odio a Melanie.



Rhett: Scarlett casate conmigo.

Scarlett: Rhett yo te odio.

Rhett: También te odio, solo deseo tu cuerpo. Ademas recuerda que soy millonario.

Scarlett: Ok, con eso me convenciste. Me casaré contigo sólo por tu dinero y podrás usar mi cuerpo mientras yo sigo amando a Ashley.



Scarlett se casa con Rhett.

Scarlett y Rhett tienen una hija llamada Bonnie.

Rhett: Te amo Scarlett. Me has hecho muy feliz.

Scarlett: El embarazo me dejó gorda. Es tu culpa Rhett, te odio.

Bonnie muere.



Scarlett: Ashley acabo de darme cuenta que no te amo. Amo es a Rhett.

Ashley: Yo también me he dado cuenta que no te amo. Amo es a Melanie. Celebremos dándonos un abrazo.

Ven a Scarlett y Ashley abrazados. Le dicen a Rhett y a Melanie que estan siendo engañados.



Melanie: Scarlett, querida, se que eres incapaz de eso. Tu eres un angel.

Scarlett: Te amo Melanie.

Melanie muere.



Scarlett: Rhett, Melanie murió.

Rhett: Debes estar feliz, ahora puedes largarte con Ashley.

Scarlett: No, ya no lo amo. Te amo es a ti.

Rhett: Lastima yo ya no te amo.

Scarlett: Pero que yo SÍ te amo.

Rhett:


*Inserte aquí millones de lagrimas mientras leía este final*

Llore tanto que las ultimas paginas de mi libro quedaron irremediablemente manchadas. Y desde ese momento y para siempre soy una fanática de Lo Que El Viento Se Llevó.

( )
  Glire | Jul 7, 2014 |
Who doesn't love this book? Scarlet is so shallow, but I still pull for her. Melanie is so weak and sweet, but for some reason she's the bad guy. This novel defies conventional expectations ( )
  saradiann | Jun 29, 2014 |
I read this book in about 2007 after I graduated from high school. I wanted to be studious. ( )
  allygggggg | May 26, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 268 (next | show all)
An old fashioned, romantic narrative with no Joycean or Proustian nonsense about it, the novel is written in a methodical style which fastidious readers may find wearying. But so carefully does Author Mitchell build up her central character of Scarlett O'Hara, and her picture of the times in which that wild woman struggled, that artistic lapses seem scarcely more consequential than Scarlett's many falls from grace.
added by Shortride | editTime (Jul 6, 1936)
 
This is beyond a doubt one of the most remarkable first novels produced by an American writer. It is also one of the best.
 
The historical background is the chief virtue of the book, and it is the story of the times rather than the unconvincing and somewhat absurd plot that gives Miss Mitchell's work whatever importance may be attached to it.
added by Shortride | editThe New York Times, Ralph Thompson (pay site) (Jun 30, 1936)
 
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Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To J. R. M.
First words
Scarlett O'Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm, as the Tarleton twins were.
Quotations
As God is my witness, I'll never be hungry again. (Scarlett)
I don't know nothin' 'bout birthin' babies. (Prissy)
After all, tomorrow is another day.
My dear, I don't give a damn.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This LT work is for Margaret Mitchell's original 1936 novel, Gone with the Wind. Please distinguish it both from partial copies of the work (one or another volume from a 2, 3 or 4-volume set) and from the 1939 movie version of the same name. Thank you.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Set in Georgia at the time of the Civil War, this is the story of headstrong Scarlett O'Hara, her three marriages and her determination to keep her father's property of Tara, despite the vicissitudes of war and passion.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 068483068X, Hardcover)

An anniversary edition of Margaret Mitchell's timeless classic.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:27:38 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

An epic story of the South's fight to maintain its way of life during the Civil War years. Scarlett O'Hara and her family are amongst the ladies and gentlemen at the Twelve Oaks Plantation's ball before the Civil War begins. Scarlett's love for one man keeps her from seeing the love that another man truly has for her. As the South finally crumbles around her, Scarlett devises a way to overcome starvation in order to save herself and her family.… (more)

» see all 8 descriptions

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