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Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
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Gone with the Wind (original 1936; edition 2007)

by Margaret Mitchell, Pat Conroy (Preface)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
15,924334111 (4.33)1001
Member:thatguyzero
Title:Gone with the Wind
Authors:Margaret Mitchell
Other authors:Pat Conroy (Preface)
Info:Scribner (2007), Edition: 1st Scribner Trade Pbk. Ed, Paperback, 960 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:**
Tags:Pulitzer Prize, 20th Century

Work details

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell (1936)

  1. 60
    The Wind Done Gone: A Novel by Alice Randall (lquilter, petersonvl)
    lquilter: This work was rewritten to tell the other side of Gone With the Wind, the story that Mitchell elided with her romanticized view of racism and slavery and its "happier when they were slaves" survivors. The Mitchell estate chose to sue for copyright infringement, but lost because the court recognized that this work is an important critical commentary on Gone with the Wind, and the beliefs that animated the original.… (more)
  2. 60
    Forever Amber by Kathleen Winsor (avalon_today)
    avalon_today: They are both scandalous women. It’s a love hate relationship.
  3. 30
    Jubilee by Margaret Walker (lquilter)
    lquilter: Jubilee is the true story of the author's great grandmother, a woman born to slavery as the daughter of a slave and a white slave-owner. She acted as servant to her white sister, and was a witness to antebellum life, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
  4. 20
    Oh, Kentucky! by Betty Layman Receveur (blonderedhead)
    blonderedhead: Strong female heroine in a sweeping, romantic and exciting historical fiction novel. I loved both books...and think others might, too.
  5. 10
    War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy (GCPLreader)
    GCPLreader: melodrama in the midst of war and the invasion (and burning!) of a major city
  6. 10
    The Wind Is Never Gone: Sequels, Parodies and Rewritings of Gone with the Wind by M. Carmen Gomez-galisteo (Prinzipessa, Prinzipessa)
    Prinzipessa: This book explains Gone with the Wind and analyzes its sequels, parodies as well as the fan fiction stories based on Gone With the Wind.
  7. 10
    The Legacy by Katherine Webb (tesskrose)
  8. 21
    A Skeptic's Luck by A.D. Morel (A.D.Morel)
    A.D.Morel: There's this feeling of longing, that she will not quite get there, yet we are passionately rooting for the main character, we go through her travails with her.
  9. 00
    The Winds of Tara: The Saga Lives On by Katherine Pinotti (veracity)
    veracity: 'Winds of Tara' is an unauthorised sequel to 'Gone with the Wind'.
  10. 00
    Heart of the West by Penelope Williamson (theshadowknows)
    theshadowknows: These books share a similar epic, sweeping feel in bringing to life a lost and fading ideal (the American frontier in Heart of the West and the old, genteel south in Gone with the Wind.)
  11. 22
    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (StarryNightElf)
  12. 12
    My Name is Mary Sutter by Robin Oliveira (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  13. 12
    Katherine by Anya Seton (avalon_today)
    avalon_today: Its about having to deal with a very strong, charismatic man. *Sigh*
  14. 13
    Rhett Butler's People by Donald McCaig (mrstreme)
  15. 58
    Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind by Alexandra Ripley (Nyxn)
1930s (50)
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» See also 1001 mentions

English (324)  Spanish (3)  Italian (1)  Danish (1)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  French (1)  All languages (332)
Showing 1-5 of 324 (next | show all)
This novel definitely stands the test of time, still as good as it was when I read it over 20 years ago. A great romance combined with great historical detail. Rhett Butler is still my favorite character, brilliant, sarcastic, flippant. So many people do not read this because of the movie, but the movie is a pale imitation. Please Read It! You won't regret it. ( )
  memccauley6 | May 3, 2016 |
An incredible encapsulation of the people, culture, and events of the American Civil War and the Reconstruction years in the Atlanta, Georgia area. Centers around the life of Scarlett O'Hara, the spoiled daughter of a gentile and lovely French mother and a first-generation Irish immigrant father, who made his fortune and built a life and a beautiful plantation named "Tara". We see their bucolic life before the War, which had a foundation built on the backs of their 100+ slaves. We see into their life, and how they viewed it, and how, when that foundation crumbled as a result of the War, we watch this family and their neighbors survive (or not) the difficulties they now have to face on their own.

There are a lot of moments, of course, that make a person cringe as you read this book: the way their slaves are viewed as children or how they have "child-like minds", disturbing references to their race which don't need to be repeated here, derogatory terminology, etc. We don't witness any beatings or auctions or anything like what is represented in other literature of this time period, but we do witness the fashion in which the whites treat their slaves--even those they truly love and consider part of their family--in a haughty, entitled manner. Those things are hard to read, but it seems that this is an accurate time capsule of how people viewed their world and those in it--in that time period. Even during the Reconstruction years when the Yankees were in Atlanta fighting for equal rights for the freed slaves, a lot of them seemed to hold their own dim views of the former slaves, even when trying to punish the Confederates by confiscating their property, their money, their right to vote and hold government office, etc.

The impression left is that they put illiterate former slaves in high positions but then the Yankees used them as puppets to vote the way they wanted (to favor the Republicans/Yankees) and to quiet or completely remove the voice of the Democrats/Confederates. There also was a lot of rampant crime by understandably insolent and angry freed slaves who wanted to get back at the whites. They were able to get away with these crimes because of new laws stating that whites could not charge the ex-slaves with any crimes. It appears that this complete flip-flop in society's rules is what caused the formation of secret meetings between former Confederate soldiers which evolved into the Ku Klux Klan in 1865. There was a lot of "justice" served in the darkness of night by both whites and blacks.

This story is considered an epic romance. It is definitely an epic. The romance part is questionable. It is definitely a story of a dysfunctional kind of love. It is based on a young girl's selfish and cold-hearted method of obtaining whatever she wants, often to the detriment of others. It is a story of stolen, lost, or unrequited love. This story brings out many emotions, although with very little happiness: contempt, guilt, sadness, disbelief, frustration, anger, disappointment, shock, and grief. No matter how malicious some people can be, it is still hard to witness when they themselves have to face the terrible deeds they have done.

This, of course, is a book not to be missed. Highly recommended. ( )
  AddictedToMorphemes | Apr 29, 2016 |
This was on my classic to reread list and southern literary journey list. I read this many years ago and have seen the movie many times. The movie is a classic and is worth seeing excellent casting. The book is so much better and a much larger story.

It is hard to put into words the epic nature of this novel. Written in the 1930's during the depression with the wounds of reconstruction still fresh in the minds of many.

Scarlett is a character you could just choke at times then in another moment feel a deep sympathy for her plight. Rhett is more than a cad he is mocking the fake gentility of the south and doing whats best for Rhett. Melanie is the strongest of the bunch knowing her husband is desired by Scarlett she still see fit to be friends and care more for her than for her own self.

After reading the novel for my 2nd or 3rd time I did some research on Mitchell. She secretly worked with an all black college to build a medical school and then continued with scholarships for young african americans to be able to attend the college. More information can be found on this through the Mitchell Museum in Atlanta. ( )
  yvonne.sevignykaiser | Apr 2, 2016 |
Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler--two scoundrels you can't help but cheer for. Remarkable take on the Civil War from a Southerner's point of view. The first time I saw the movie, I thought Ashley Wilkes was so wonderful, but by the time I read this book I saw him only as a good man who rightly judges his own worth but hardly deserves the undying love of not one, but two ladies. Rhett does everything a good person shouldn't do, but turns out to be one of the a man of very high morals. Scarlett--you just want to slap her--again and again. But you can't help but admire her inner strength, applaud her tiny improvements, and hope that she will finally understand that the world does not revolve around her needs and wishes only. ( )
  mamashepp | Mar 29, 2016 |
Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler--two scoundrels you can't help but cheer for. Remarkable take on the Civil War from a Southerner's point of view. The first time I saw the movie, I thought Ashley Wilkes was so wonderful, but by the time I read this book I saw him only as a good man who rightly judges his own worth but hardly deserves the undying love of not one, but two ladies. Rhett does everything a good person shouldn't do, but turns out to be one of the a man of very high morals. Scarlett--you just want to slap her--again and again. But you can't help but admire her inner strength, applaud her tiny improvements, and hope that she will finally understand that the world does not revolve around her needs and wishes only. ( )
  mamashepp | Mar 29, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 324 (next | show all)
An old fashioned, romantic narrative with no Joycean or Proustian nonsense about it, the novel is written in a methodical style which fastidious readers may find wearying. But so carefully does Author Mitchell build up her central character of Scarlett O'Hara, and her picture of the times in which that wild woman struggled, that artistic lapses seem scarcely more consequential than Scarlett's many falls from grace.
added by Shortride | editTime (Jul 6, 1936)
 
This is beyond a doubt one of the most remarkable first novels produced by an American writer. It is also one of the best.
 
The historical background is the chief virtue of the book, and it is the story of the times rather than the unconvincing and somewhat absurd plot that gives Miss Mitchell's work whatever importance may be attached to it.
added by Shortride | editThe New York Times, Ralph Thompson (pay site) (Jun 30, 1936)
 

» Add other authors (29 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mitchell, Margaretprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Auterinen, MaijaliisaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beheim-Schwarzbach, MartinÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Ein Mensch ist in seinem Leben wie Gras/er blühet wie eine Blume auf dem Felde;/wenn der Wind darüber geht, so ist sie nimmer da,/ und ihre Stätte kennet sie nicht mehr. Psalm 103
Dedication
To J. R. M.
First words
Scarlett O'Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm, as the Tarleton twins were.
Quotations
As God is my witness, I'll never be hungry again. (Scarlett)
I don't know nothin' 'bout birthin' babies. (Prissy)
After all, tomorrow is another day.
My dear, I don't give a damn.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This LT work is for Margaret Mitchell's original 1936 novel, Gone with the Wind. Please distinguish it both from partial copies of the work (one or another volume from a 2, 3 or 4-volume set) and from the 1939 movie version of the same name. Thank you.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Set in Georgia at the time of the Civil War, this is the story of headstrong Scarlett O'Hara, her three marriages and her determination to keep her father's property of Tara, despite the vicissitudes of war and passion.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 068483068X, Hardcover)

An anniversary edition of Margaret Mitchell's timeless classic.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:23 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

An epic story of the South's fight to maintain its way of life during the Civil War years. Scarlett O'Hara and her family are amongst the ladies and gentlemen at the Twelve Oaks Plantation's ball before the Civil War begins. Scarlett's love for one man keeps her from seeing the love that another man truly has for her. As the South finally crumbles around her, Scarlett devises a way to overcome starvation in order to save herself and her family.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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