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Gone with the Wind (The Margaret Mitchell…
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Gone with the Wind (The Margaret Mitchell Anniversary Edition) (original 1936; edition 1976)

by Margaret Mitchell

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15,684326113 (4.33)998
I have always loved this book. I actually have the 1939 Movie addition of this book that I won in a bet. The bet was that I could not find in the movie where the work "Damn" was said other than the famous line. It was when the men are gathered around before the war and you can hear it in the background. Everyone should read this book. It is better than the movie.
  abby2010 | Jan 30, 2010 |
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I was dreading reading this book because of 2 reasons:

It was just so long
Classic novels can be hit or miss.

I am so glad I forced myself to read it, it is the most entertaining book I have read in a long while.

The novel is about Scarlett O'Hara, the daughter of a wealthy plantation owner in Georgia. it chronicles her fall from grace as the American Civil War destroys the south. The novel is about Scarlett's drive to survive. It was simply amazing.

I loved Scarlett O'Hara, I love the fact that she understood that a roof over your head and money for food are the only things that matter otherwise you don't make it. I understood her choices and her ruthlessness. She has become one of my favourite heroines. ( )
  4everfanatical | Feb 5, 2016 |
This is one of the few books I've read several times. An all-time favorite. ( )
  Koren56 | Feb 4, 2016 |
This book may be found wanting in places, but will always shine as a great historical novel that grants the reader true insight into the American Civil War from the perspective of characters we care about. ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
Read it a million years ago. Classic good, bad, love, hate, loose, win story. Exceptional characters and background. ( )
  Greymowser | Jan 22, 2016 |
I lioved this book in high school, but couldn't abide Scarlett when I tried to reread this. The rating averages the 5 from high school with a 3 for now. ( )
  Karin7 | Jan 21, 2016 |
This is a long book so I'm slowly making my way through it. I recently saw the movie which was my maternal grandma's fave movie and that wet my appetite to read this book. It's a great read. ( )
  GingerECastro1980 | Jan 20, 2016 |
This was the first "grown up" book I ever read. In the halls of East Clinton Elementary school, a teacher suggested I read it. I was already a committed reader, but this book was my coming of age into more adult themes. I can remember being disappointed in the movie because it didn't have the richness, color, smells and enticements of the book. It started my journey... ( )
  CarmenMilligan | Jan 18, 2016 |
I liked this book much more than I thought I would, especially since I never really warmed up to Scarlett O'Hara and really disliked her in the movie. Besides that fact that there's plenty of explanation about why Scarlett does what she does (so we care about her despite her bad decisions), there's much more to this novel than a bratty woman. There's the whole history of the South, the Civil War, and the Reconstruction through the experiences and feelings of people surrounding Scarlett. This is also an introduction to feminism (although Scarlett is the epitome of a controlling, scheming, uncaring feminist) and certainly a story of survival, in which I had to admire Scarlett's determination and grit. Along with all of that, there was plenty of heartache and tragedy.

For me, this isn't a 5 star partly because there is so much repeated explanation; it could have been condensed and kept under 800 pages instead of 958. Also, despite her tragedies and Mitchell's explanation, I found myself so generally irritated with Scarlett that sometimes I didn't want to hear any more about her. ( )
  Connie-D | Jan 17, 2016 |
EXCELLENT book! ( )
  Belles007 | Jan 17, 2016 |
I love this book: I think I fell in love with Rhett Butler and then when I finally saw the whole film was shocked by how slimy Clark Gable was: while I know Rhett is meant to be swarthy and a bit nasty, I still had my own, much kinder, impressions of him. He totally overshadows Ashley so why Scarlett spends so much time chasing after him is beyond me: Rhett any day! ( )
  sashinka | Jan 14, 2016 |
This book is long (no doubt about it), but I loved it. The tale of Southern life during the Civil War and the Reconstruction really interested me. ( )
  forsanolim | Jan 14, 2016 |
Very different than the movie - a true look at how whites and blacks lived and worked together during a time where slavery was acceptable. If you love the romance part of the story you will be bogged down by the politics. However, very educational for a historical novel. If you love the romance read Scarlett. ( )
  BmeredithE | Jan 9, 2016 |
This is such a great book. I read awhile ago but I really enjoyed it. There are some definite differences from the movie. I would really recommend this book to read. ( )
  CrystalW | Dec 15, 2015 |
This is such a great book. I read awhile ago but I really enjoyed it. There are some definite differences from the movie. I would really recommend this book to read. ( )
  CrystalW | Dec 15, 2015 |
I loved this book! I've read it twice and seen the movie at least three times...maybe more! ( )
  CassandraSabo | Dec 5, 2015 |
I read after seeing the movie, probably more than 40 years ago so memory a bit vague.

I found the book richer in setting the scene of the South of the time, paid more attention to secondary characters except for children. Children were apt to disappear, certainly Scarlett's from her own mind or any efforts at mothering, then switched up when belle(?) came into the picture. Better explained some motivations and customs (well, usually book does do that better than the movie).

Kept me riveted but 100% the movie Scarlett was the more sympathetic version. Rather disliked in the book, but, I was too young to be reading and really freaked out over the invisible kids that were not in the movie at all and that kept appearing then not even being mentioned in the book.

A great deal, particularly childbirth, suitors, marriage, etc. completely would have eluded me back then.

Re-reading as an adult, held up way better than expected. Loved this book and thought the contemporary sequel really veered so far off the story that Scarlett was no longer at all recognizable(plus plot implausible). ( )
  Spurts | Oct 29, 2015 |
I read after seeing the movie, probably more than 40 years ago so memory a bit vague.

I found the book richer in setting the scene of the South of the time, paid more attention to secondary characters except for children. Children were apt to disappear, certainly Scarlett's from her own mind or any efforts at mothering, then switched up when belle(?) came into the picture. Better explained some motivations and customs (well, usually book does do that better than the movie).

Kept me riveted but 100% the movie Scarlett was the more sympathetic version. Rather disliked in the book, but, I was too young to be reading and really freaked out over the invisible kids that were not in the movie at all and that kept appearing then not even being mentioned in the book.

A great deal, particularly childbirth, suitors, marriage, etc. completely would have eluded me back then.

Re-reading as an adult, held up way better than expected. Loved this book and thought the contemporary sequel really veered so far off the story that Scarlett was no longer at all recognizable(plus plot implausible). ( )
  Spurts | Oct 29, 2015 |
The fact that this was the first and only book written by Margaret Mitchell is at once awe inspiring and a shame. If there ever was a book that was worth the commitment of time, this is it. An entirely new dimension to the Civil War is given, one from the Southerners point of view.

The details, both historical and descriptive, are a perfect balance between informative and artistic. You receive a full history lesson without feeling parched.

To even discuss the movie within a review of the book seems like a sin. Because of the fame of the movie, it must be done. If you are a fan of the movie and have never read the book, you only know Scarlett's shadow. You only saw Rhett Butler from across the room. After reading the book, I understand fully why Mrs. Mitchell was unhappy with the movie, even the idea of turning the book into a movie.

The story is the South, you need the time to relax and let it unfold in front of you. You will fall in love. ( )
  stacykurko | Oct 29, 2015 |
No words can do justice to this epic novel. I read this book in high school, holed up in my room. I laughed and I cried. I loved and hated Scarlett. I routed for her and couldn't believe some of the choices she made. It is an all time favorite and I hope everyone takes the time to read it at some point. It's an amazing historical fiction that you won't be able to put down. ( )
1 vote Nemorn | Sep 20, 2015 |
I feel like I have come of age! Gone With The Wind will never be be one of my favourite novels, but I did find the whole experience entertaining, informative and slightly disturbing, in a social justice warrior kind of way. Scarlett O'Hara is a fantastic anti-heroine, who thinks like a man, flirts like a southern belle and really, really hates having children (you go, girl), while Rhett Butler is an enigmatic romantic hero (I thought about reading Rhett Butler's People next, but will probably skip the published fan fiction - Rhett's appeal comes from not knowing too much). Oh, and I was surprised that all the major plot points that I associated with the movie - Scarlett and Rhett, Bonnie, Melanie - seem to happen in the last few chapters of the story. GWTW is probably an easy book to abridge!

My knowledge of the American Civil War is sketchy to say the least, so I really loved the historical backdrop, as with Orczy and The Scarlet Pimpernel. There is - obviously - a definite southern slant, and so many racist terms and views - all perfectly era appropriate - that I'm surprised Margaret Mitchell's novel is still in print. Surprised, but pleased. Character-wise, I found Scarlett and Melanie to be equally inspiring and aggravating - a friend who recommended the novel to me claimed that Melanie is the true heroine, but I think a whole book about her soft brown eyes and heart of gold would have been too nauseating to finish. Rhett and Ashley are also strangely like two sides of a coin, one dark and devilish, one fair and foppish. And I would love to read a serious attempt at writing GWTW from the perspective of Mammy and the other slaves!

Glad I managed to finish, will definitely watch the whole of the movie next - probably won't read again, though. ( )
1 vote AdonisGuilfoyle | Sep 1, 2015 |
The annual airing of [Gone with the Wind] was a big event in our home with my older sisters glued to the television for two nights, aflutter with every smirk and every eyebrow twitch from Clark Gable. I tried to be somewhere else when the opening credits rolled – I still have a vivid memory of an brilliant fire-orange sky silhouetting a large barren tree and an extremely grave orchestral production playing in the background that gives me an urge to run. My sisters on an old, uncomfortable couch – it was orange, as well, now that I think of it – were the ones really glued to the screen. My mother always had something else to do, sewing in her lap or shelling pecans into a bowl. And, like me, this was one of those rare times when my father disappeared from his ‘easy chair,’, though I’m not sure where he went or what he did for those two nights.

Scampering through the living room and into the kitchen for a snack – always upsetting the girls who were worried that I might obscure Rhett’s striking profile for two seconds as I ran in front of the television – I captured a few other long lasting perceptions. Women resembled the tiny figurines from grandma’s house, dangerously swollen hoop skirts around cinched-in waists and garish, oversized hats framing china doll skin. The men were as preposterously dressed, at least through a young boy’s eyes, peacocking in bright, shiny suits; they acted funny, too, these strange men, always flitting around the women, one minute grabbing them up in violent embraces and then shoving them away or ignoring them altogether. And the black people spoke a foreign language, as far as I could tell.

Over the years, I always associated [Gone with the Wind] with my sisters. It never occurred to me that my mother was really paying attention, that she followed the story or that it had any impact on her. I found out I was wrong as I read the book for the first time and found Scarlett declaring, “I’ll think about that tomorrow. Tomorrow’s another day.” Countless times mom used those words to soothe me through some adolescent fit. She’d smile at me, fix me with her black, Irish eyes, and say, “Don’t worry, honey. Just remember, tomorrow’s another day.” So, every time I read Scarlett’s mantra in the book, I saw my mother’s face again, felt her calloused, work-worn hands around mine.

Of course, my mother identified with [Gone with the Wind], though I can’t say whether it was the book or the movie that captured her. But it wasn’t that handsome rogue Rhett Butler that drew her in – it was Scarlett. After all, mom was a West Texas rancher’s daughter. She was strong-willed and wild – my grandmother recalled spanking her nearly every morning before she walked down the dirt road to school. After one whipping, she told Gra’am, “When I grow up, I’m going to have baby girl and I’m going to name her ‘mother’ and I’m going to whip her every day.” I can see Scarlett’s defiance in my mother’s steely gaze, feel the same independent grit radiating off them both. But it wasn’t the pre-Civil war Scarlett she saw herself in, not the spoiled child in frills – it was the reconstruction Scarlett, chapped hands and sun-burnt from picking cotton in a near barren field. When Scarlett swears never to be hungry again, my mother’s recycling of useless things and keeping of food long past its freshness made sense to me, because mom was also a depression child. She and her siblings wore cardboard soled shoes, handing them down through five children regardless the size or number of worn through holes. They drank goat’s milk and ate beans and scraped at the dirt for whatever would grow. “Tomorrow is another day,” allowed Scarlett, and my mother, to forget about the day’s hunger and pain by focusing on the next day’s hope, even if it was a dim and vague hope.

Like Scarlett and my mother, Mitchell was a rare breed, penning a book about the Civil War and setting it around a female heroine. The book is as deeply researched and detailed as any other on the war between the states, offering a rich history of the shifting momentums in the war with each battle and a skilled commentary, through Rhett and Ashley’s eyes, on the seeds of the South’s ultimate destruction. Yet the book’s focus never wavers from those who were left behind when the bullets began to fly. We don’t see the battles through the soldier’s eyes, we learn about them as families did, through gossip and word of mouth. We don’t lie on the battlefields with the wounded and dying, we wait on the street outside the newspaper office with the whole of Atlanta for the dead’s names to be published. We don’t march with the hungry, exhausted soldiers, we hide in the house with the women and children, afraid and paranoid as the invading Yankees ride the roads. Woven through it all is Mitchell’s view on life as a Southern woman, relegated to be an object of beauty and desire but required by circumstances to be the independent, powerful nucleus that could sustain a family’s survival. I suspect my mother saw herself, and her own mother, in that incongruity, and reveled in the power that making your place in the world brings.

Bottom Line: Not just your mother’s bodice ripper – there’s untold depths to this classic.

5 bones!!!!!
A favorite for the year. ( )
12 vote blackdogbooks | Jul 25, 2015 |
This was the first novel where I worried about the relationship between the author and the protagonist. It seems like the author had a love/hate relationship with the protagonist. The author kept pummeling the protagonist with troubles and disappointments. The protagonist manages to survive but in the end is still slave to her misplaced desires. ( )
  joeydag | Jul 23, 2015 |
I was between 1/2 to 5/8 through the novel, and I reread the first few words of the book: "Scarlett O'Hara was not beautiful." I think the line could have been "Gone with the Wind was not beautiful." I started reading this book a week or so before an idiot, a confederate flag flying fool, killed several people in a Charleston North Carolina church. Before that event, the book made me uncomfortable with the racist views. After the event, the material had bigger impact, making me roll my eyes in snotty superiority. That didn't make me feel good, and made this an uncomfortable book for me to read. ( )
1 vote mainrun | Jul 5, 2015 |
IMHO, it says something sad about the make-up of LibraryThing's user group that this badly written, caricaturish, racist apologetic is in the top 150 in overall popularity. Anyone who loves literature as "the eternal affirmation of the spirit of man [sic]" should despair along with me. ( )
1 vote CSRodgers | May 27, 2015 |
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