HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time…
Loading...

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (original 2007; edition 2009)

by Sherman Alexie

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,397654475 (4.32)477
Member:firstperson
Title:The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
Authors:Sherman Alexie
Info:Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (2009), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie (2007)

Recently added byPaula.Sides, Hank.K, SidneyT419, private library, kallai7, ThereseRygg, Mel4, MichieAllin, ftakahashi
  1. 30
    Reservation Blues by Sherman Alexie (PghDragonMan)
    PghDragonMan: Contemporary fiction about searching for identity
  2. 30
    Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (Othemts)
  3. 32
    The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz (bbudke)
  4. 10
    The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint by Brady Udall (kiwiflowa)
    kiwiflowa: A similar story for older teens/adults. Edgar is an American Indian orphan coming of age.
  5. 21
    Kira-Kira by Cynthia Kadohata (whymaggiemay)
    whymaggiemay: There are many similarities of theme, not the least of which are loss and identity.
  6. 00
    Red Sky at Morning by Richard Bradford (mysterymax)
  7. 22
    Looking for Alaska by John Green (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  8. 00
    Riding Invisible by Sandra Alonzo (meggyweg)
  9. 00
    A Step From Heaven by An Na (cammykitty)
    cammykitty: Different in feel altogether from Diary, but also another good novel about entering and adjusting to predominantly white-American culture
  10. 00
    Broken Glass Park by Alina Bronsky (Anonymous user)
  11. 01
    Dakota Dream by James W. Bennett (meggyweg)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 477 mentions

English (649)  Dutch (2)  German (1)  Swedish (1)  All (653)
Showing 1-5 of 649 (next | show all)
Summary: A story about Arnold Spirit, also known as Junior who is a 15-year-old member of the Spokane tribe. He lives on the reservation and goes to school with his best friend Rowdy. He narrates a story from his perspective, talking about the struggles of living on the reservation, and various aspects of his family and friend. Junior realizes that the textbook he utilizes in school is thirty years older than he is, and decides to transfer to a school called Reardan, a high school in a rich white town. This decision isolates Junior from people on the reservation and disrupts his long time friendship with Rowdy. At the new school, Junior is a misfit but befriends Gordy an outsider, and Penelope a beautiful girl who faces her own challenges. At the school, he hides that he is poor, which eventually gets figured out by Penelope and Rodger a popular boy who shows kindness to Junior. Junior makes the varsity basketball team at Reardan and faces struggles when he plays his old school, and his old friend Rowdy. A series of tragedies, including the death of his grandmother, the murder of his dad’s best friend, and the death of his sister, leaves Junior devastated. He struggles to understand his place in the world, but from the support of his friends, he makes it through. And during summer vacation he reconciles his friendship with Rowdy.

Personal Response: The author of this book grew up on the Spokane Indian Reservation and writes about his experiences as an Indigenous America with ancestry from several tribes. The book although fiction, it felt like a true story throughout the whole book as the author writes on his personal experiences. It was nicely written and describes the immense struggles of the life on this specific Spokane reservation. However, it told a beautiful story of the challenges he faced, overcoming those struggles, and the friendships he created that supported him through those hard times.

Curriculum Connections: This book would be a great book to use for high school Social Studies class when learning about Native American Studies, various reservations, their cultures, and their traditions. It can also be used as a book to teach students about friendship, kindness, life challenges, and courage. ( )
  ftakahashi | Mar 25, 2017 |
This was an interesting and somewhat inspirational book about an adolescents boys life in an Indian reservation and how he persevered and tried to better his life by going to and all white school.This book was written in such a way that was easily understandable. the colorful language throughout the book makes it a good fit for the high school level. This text could be used in a lesson to teach perseverance and cultural diversity. ( )
  A_Whitney | Mar 18, 2017 |
Ok, so I know this book is a classic and my daughter had to read it for school. So, I decided to listen to it on audio while I was driving in my car. The author narrated the book and I hated the way he spoke and the voices he used. They seemed whiny and annoying most of the time. I am certain this affected the way I felt about the book.

The story was touching, funny and heartbreaking at times. It seemed a bit too pushy with the "all Indians are drunks" thing and that sort of bothered me. But, the main character, Junior, is inspirational in that he decides he wants something better for himself and takes the chance to go to an all white school to find it. He is brave, crazy, stupid, and funny all at the same time. Leaving the reservation to go to a different school is huge and causes a lot of turmoil in Junior's life, but he struggles through it.

In my opinion, if you are interested in this book, skip the audio and just read it yourself. :) ( )
  Jadedog13 | Mar 10, 2017 |
This book is about a journey that one young boy, Junior, takes moving from the reservation high school to an all-white high school off reservation. He overcomes many challenges and struggles both within himself and with the people around him. But, in the end, he is able to make the most out of the experience. ( )
  AimeeSword | Feb 17, 2017 |
I just finished reading this book for the second time. The first read was shortly after it was published, and I sent it to my young grand-nephew who lives in Seattle. This time around I needed something funny but poignant to take my mind off what's happening in the world. This second reading didn't disappoint. Junior speaks for all of us, doesn't he? Our insecurities, our hopes, our dreams, our struggles to make our lives better. Layered on top of his experience, though, are factors most of us don't have to take into account: racism, poverty, alcoholism, and a pervasive feeling of being an actual Other--not just in the figurative, teen-aged angst filled sense of being different. The pathos lying just beneath the surface of Alexie's writing is what wins me over every time I read his books. ( )
  ucla70 | Jan 19, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 649 (next | show all)
Working in the voice of a 14-year-old forces Alexie to strip everything down to action and emotion, so that reading becomes more like listening to your smart, funny best friend recount his day while waiting after school for a ride home.
 
Ok, so I know this book is a classic and my daughter had to read it for school. So, I decided to listen to it on audio while I was driving in my car. The author narrated the book and I hated the way he spoke and the voices he used. They seemed whiny and annoying most of the time. I am certain this affected the way I felt about the book.

The story was touching, funny and heartbreaking at times. It seemed a bit too pushy with the "all Indians are drunks" thing and that sort of bothered me. But, the main character, Junior, is inspirational in that he decides he wants something better for himself and takes the chance to go to an all white school to find it. He is brave, crazy, stupid, and funny all at the same time. Leaving the reservation to go to a different school is huge and causes a lot of turmoil in Junior's life, but he struggles through it.

In my opinion, if you are interested in this book, skip the audio and just read it yourself. :)
 

» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sherman Alexieprimary authorall editionscalculated
Forney, EllenIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
There is another world, but it is in this one. --W.B. Yeats
Dedication
For Wellpinit and Reardon, my hometowns
First words
I was born with water on the brain. Okay, so that's not exactly true. I was actually born with too much cerebral spinal fluid inside my skull. But cerebral spinal fluid is just the doctors' fancy way of saying brain grease.
Quotations
"No, I'm serious. I always knew you were going to leave. I always knew you were going to leave us behind and travel the world. I had this dream about you a few months ago. You were standing on the Great Wall of China. You looked happy. And I was happy for you."
During one week when I was little, Dad got stopped three times for DWI: Driving While Indian.
“Son,” Mr. P. said. “You’re going to find more and more hope the farther and farther you walk away from this sad, sad, sad reservation.”
I'd always been the lowest Indian on the reservation totem pole-- I wasn't expected to be good so I wasn't. But in Reardan, my coach and the other players wanted me to be good. They needed me to be good. They expected me to be good. And so I became good.
"I used to think the world was broken down by tribes," I said. "By black and white. By Indian and white. But I know that isn't true. The world is only broken into two tribes. The people who are assholes and the people who are not."
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Some editions, like ISBN 9780316013697, include study guide
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Jr is struggling with being a poor Indian. He is given the opportunity to leave the reservation and start a new life outside of the Native American culture. And thus the story goes from chapter to chapter. This books crosses cultures of the Native American and Reardan, a white/christian culture in a rural setting. This story can be used on many fronts in a classroom. Racism, culture boundaries, friendship(Rowdy, Penelope), and having the ability to change your life. A great story with a lot of possibilities in a classroom.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0316013692, Paperback)

Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings that reflect the character's art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he thought he was destined to live.


The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Alexie's YA debut, released in hardcover to instant success, recieving seven starred reviews, hitting numerous bestseller lists, and winning the 2007 National Book Award for Young People's Literature.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:14 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 avail.
497 wanted
5 pay8 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.32)
0.5
1 15
1.5 2
2 41
2.5 17
3 205
3.5 92
4 827
4.5 223
5 1098

Audible.com

3 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 113,264,460 books! | Top bar: Always visible