HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Yendi by Steven Brust
Loading...
MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,000148,556 (3.94)1 / 60
Recently added byPolly1707, ihnmaims, private library, JeanGoodrich, renbedell, -sunny-, Glennis.LeBlanc, Maddz

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
Originally posted at Fantasy Literature: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/reviews/yendi/

Loveable assassin Vlad Taltos is back in Yendi, the second in Steven Brust??s VLAD TALTOS series. Yendi is actually a prequel to the first novel, Jhereg which introduced us to Vlad, his wife Cawti, his familiar, and several of his friends and enemies. Vlad is a new mob boss who is trying to protect his territory from the encroachment of neighboring mob bosses. When one of them sets up a racket in Vladƒ??s territory, Vlad has to take him on. As usual, heƒ??ll need all his wits and all his friends just to stay alive.

In Yendi we learn a little more about the Dragaeran Empire, the Dragon Lords, and the activities of Vlad and the other bosses, but for some readers the most significant event is the story of how Vlad met Cawti, how she killed him, and how they fell in love. I was looking forward to this story, but it was a disappointment. The romance was dull and not very believable because of how instantaneous it was. Another complaint I have is the same thing I complained about in my review of the first book, Jhereg: Vlad solves crimes or mysteries by using convoluted suppositions that just happen to be right and thereƒ??s no way the reader could have figured out what was going on. This is disappointing because Iƒ??ve learned that itƒ??s not much use to try to use my brain to remember clues or reason out a conclusion ƒ?? Iƒ??ll never work it out on my own.

This sense of feeling slightly lost is part of Steven Brustƒ??s unique style. He drops you right into his complex world, but only gives cursory explanations of the characters, politics and history as he goes along. Generally I like this technique because it doesnƒ??t interrupt the plot, but there were several times while reading Yendi that I wasnƒ??t certain that I understood the implications or all the nuances of what was happening. I was reading the audio version, so Iƒ??m not sure if I missed a glossary in the back, but fortunately there are plenty of resources on the internet for those seeking to study more of Brustƒ??s world.

Even though I donƒ??t fully understand Brustƒ??s world yet, I like it. I like Brustƒ??s sense of humor (very dry) and I like Vlad Taltos and his turf war. Iƒ??m going to keep reading this series for these reasons and because I have friends whose opinions I trust who love this series. I expect that the more I learn, the more Iƒ??ll like it, too.

I read the audio version which was recently produced by Audible Frontiers and read by Bernard Setaro Clark who is excellent in every way. Yendi is less than 7 hours long. ( )
  Kat_Hooper | Apr 6, 2014 |
This book occurs before book 1 of the series (chronologically). I did not know this when I picked it up so was bit confused as to the goings-on - particularly when some stuff that happened in this story had already been referred to in book one.

There is a bit less of urban fantasy vigilante novel feel and a bit more of a detective novel feel. And a bit more investigating and a bit less action. Not sure if this was a good thing, or a bad one though... I like having the action to move it forward and feel like justice is being served, but the detective part helped flesh out the world and characters.

All in all, it was pretty good, and I have bought the rest in the series. Though I do hope it goes back to the tone/feel of book one. ( )
  crazybatcow | Mar 23, 2014 |
Thank goodness I knew beforehand that the Vlad Taltos books aren't written in order of the timeline, or else I would have been really confused. This is the second book in the series to be published, but actually takes place before the first book, to the time when Vlad first meets his wife Cawti.

I really liked Cawti's character in Jhereg, and I was excited to find out she was going to have a much bigger role in this novel, based on its synopsis. So I was slightly let down when a third of the book breezed by and she still hadn't shown up; I think I was waiting with bated breath the whole time for that to happen. Eventually, amidst the Jhereg war that Vlad has started with rival Laris, she does make her appearance along with her partner-in-crime Norathar.

It was the high point for me, even though from the previous book we were told Vlad met Cawti while the latter was trying to assassinate him, so I knew what to expect. Despite that, it didn't diminish the scene in any way. A quote Vlad made from Jhereg still resonates with me, about how couples typically fall in love first then get married and spend the rest of their lives trying to kill each other, while with the two of them had it the other way around. I still chuckle when I think of it.

Still, the process of the two of them falling in love was really awkward, but somehow due to the book's style I suspect it was meant to be. It happened so quickly, with hardly any build up at all -- it seemed to me Vlad and Cawti literally jumped into bed after "Hello". Readers looking for elements of romance would be sorely disappointed, but then again Vlad doesn't seem like the type to be sentimental!

The story of the Jhereg war that started all this was very entertaining, at least, though there's a lot more the mystery angle in this book than the last. The breakneck pace of these novels means that sometimes the clues and the conclusions they lead to are sometimes hard to follow, especially since there are so much history and so many names thrown around. I think Yendi would have been more suspenseful if it hadn't been a "prequel" and we didn't already know how certain events played out, but this was another good read all in all, fast and fun. ( )
  stefferoo | Jun 7, 2013 |
The second book in the Vlad Taltos series is something of a prequel to the first, Jhereg. In this we learn about how Vlad met and fell in love with Cawti, who would be his wife by the time of the first novel.

We also see much of Vlad's rise in the Jhereg organization. We see how he assembles his crew and stakes out a claim in the neighborhood. We see his early friendships blooming with his Dragonlord allies, Morrolan and Aliera.

Like the first book, this one is a story that is detective fiction set in a fantasy world. This has more elements of The Godfather thrown in, but still carries the mystery very well. Vlad has a problem and must use his resources, both magical and political, to figure out what is going on and survive it.

So far these Vlad books come across as episodes in a larger series. The individual stories are self-contained and pretty short, with everything being wrapped up as the mystery is solved. Yet there is also that feeling that each one contributes to a larger, epic scale that will be slowly explored over the 19 books that are planned in the series (12 are currently out there).

I'm definitely in this for the long haul... ( )
  Texas_Reaver | Mar 31, 2013 |
Book 2 in the Vlad Taltos series. This one backfills a lot of details from Jhereg. Poker players should love this book: Vlad spends a lot of time trying to figure out what his opponents are up to, so he can decide on the right course of action.
  vis02124 | Mar 3, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Steven Brustprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Clark, Bernard SetaroNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hickman,StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
When I was young, I was taught that every citizen of the Dragaeran Empire was born into one of the seventeen Great Houses, each named for an animal.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
8 avail.
10 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5
1
1.5
2 6
2.5 3
3 43
3.5 21
4 89
4.5 11
5 51

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,294,806 books! | Top bar: Always visible