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Moonheart by Charles de Lint
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Moonheart (original 1984; edition 1984)

by Charles de Lint

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,745276,993 (4.03)1 / 132
When Sara and Jamie discovered the seemingly ordinary artifacts, they sensed the pull of a dim and distant place. A world of mists and forests, of ancient magics, mythical beings, ageless bards...and restless evil. Now, with their friends and enemies alike--Blue, the biker; Keiran, the folk musician; the Inspector from the RCMP; and the mysterious Tom Hengyr--Sara and Jamie are drawn into this enchanted land through the portals of Tamson House, that sprawling downtown edifice that straddles two worlds. Sweeping from ancient Wales to the streets of Ottawa today,Moonheart will entrance you with its tale of this world and the other one at the very edge of sight...and the unforgettable people caught up in the affairs of both. A tale of music, and motorcycles, and fey folk beyond the shadows of the moon. A tale of true magic; the tale ofMoonheart.… (more)
Member:littlebookworm
Title:Moonheart
Authors:Charles de Lint
Info:Ace Books (1984), Mass Market Paperback, 485 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:read 2009, fantasy

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Moonheart by Charles de Lint (1984)

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Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
Where do I begin with this review of one of the most influential books in my life? It is splendid. I have read and re-read it for (literally) decades, and I always find something new in it. Whether it's the explanation of the magick that resides in music, to the idea of an Otherworld that exists next to our own, the chance finding of magical items, there are elements that continue to draw me in.

The basic premise is a house in Ottawa built by the grandfather of the current owner that is massive and takes up one entire city block. It houses Jamie Tams and his orphaned niece, Sara. They have an inheritance and run a little flea market where Sara finds some interesting artifacts in a box in the back. Concurrently, the local RCMP are running an operation looking into the paranormal, but behind those scenes is a rich, evil business man who craves absolute power.

Woven into this tale of music and mystery is the feud between the Welsh bard Taliesin, the druid he cast into stone before being set off across the Atlantic in a coracle, and the mythical beings who inhabit the New World, a seemingly ageless sorcerer's apprentice, and the Ottawa folk music scene, and the tale-telling abilities of a master story teller, and you have a classic urban fantasy. ( )
  threadnsong | Apr 25, 2020 |
I "read" this in the audiobook format. There's an awful lot to say, but perhaps the first and most obvious thing is that de Lint is a trailblazer of urban fantasy, and much of that is on display here. At the same time, things like the tropes around indigeneity are troubling. It's so very much a part of and an expression of its time period (early 1980s) that it's difficult to read it today without putting oneself there. This is both a success and trouble in the book that goes outside of how I think most readers would come to it.
  james.d.gifford | Apr 4, 2020 |
just finished listening (primarily) to Moonheart. I loved it so much. It is involved and profound and fascinating and nostalgic and enrapturing and was just the perfect thing for me just right now. I cannot believe there's no movie or tv series of this book for me to watch now. What do I read next?! This is one of those books where you feel like nothing else is going to satisfy you that same way for a while. ( )
1 vote avanders | Nov 17, 2019 |
I absolutely adore this book. I've read it many times over the years and the story never gets old. It makes me happy.

Edit 06/04/2015: Annnd I'm reading it again. ( )
  authenticjoy | Mar 29, 2019 |
This classic fantasy novel is highly enjoyable and very tense, though not flawless. It's a book with an incredible magical house (the best part of the whole book), Ottawa Mounties who investigate the paranormal, and melded Celtic and First Nations mythology. It feels like a huge, deep fantasy, and is original in so many ways.

Yet uneven in others. The shifting point of view really jolted me at the start and I never fully adjusted to the technique. There is a huge cast of characters, and I struggled to keep everyone straight. It didn't help that a large number of characters were bland stereotypes. Pretty much all of the native characters came across that way-not negative stereotypes, necessarily, but tired ones. Same with a major Celtic bard, too--he was paint-by-numbers in every way. There were two instances of insta-love that were so insta-love I was left bewildered.

That said, it's still a gripping book. There's the HOUSE! The magnificent Tamson House that straddles worlds and defends its people. And there's... well. The house is the best part. Read it for the house, as it does end up taking over the plot in a big way through the end. ( )
  ladycato | Oct 28, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
de Lint, Charlesprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bergen, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Garcia, Paul MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mattingly, David B.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vess, CharlesIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Sara Kendall once read somewhere that the tale of the world is like a tree.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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When Sara and Jamie discovered the seemingly ordinary artifacts, they sensed the pull of a dim and distant place. A world of mists and forests, of ancient magics, mythical beings, ageless bards...and restless evil. Now, with their friends and enemies alike--Blue, the biker; Keiran, the folk musician; the Inspector from the RCMP; and the mysterious Tom Hengyr--Sara and Jamie are drawn into this enchanted land through the portals of Tamson House, that sprawling downtown edifice that straddles two worlds. Sweeping from ancient Wales to the streets of Ottawa today,Moonheart will entrance you with its tale of this world and the other one at the very edge of sight...and the unforgettable people caught up in the affairs of both. A tale of music, and motorcycles, and fey folk beyond the shadows of the moon. A tale of true magic; the tale ofMoonheart.

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