HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Letters from Nuremberg: My Father's…
Loading...

Letters from Nuremberg: My Father's Narrative of a Quest for Justice

by Christopher Dodd

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
763158,327 (3.64)2
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
Wow. I got incredibly tired of hearing "Grace, my dearest one". Not to mention I find what happened during the Nuremburg Trials far more intriguing than what Dodd had for dinner. Unfortunately, Christopher thought we would benefit from this information.
  delirium | May 8, 2008 |
This book is a compilation of the letters which Thomas J. Dodd wrote his wife while he was prsoecuting the Nazi bigwigs in Nuremberg. One gets the idea that the success of the prosecuiton was largely Dodd's doing. He is quite critical of various persons involved in the trial, e.g., Francis Biddle, American judge, has no good word spoken of him by Dodd. There are interesting comments on Connecticut politics. Dodd is very critical of Chester Bowles and Brien MacMahon, prominent Connecticut Democrats.. In every letter Dodd tells his wife how much he loves her, which is fine but this does not make for fascinating reading for anyone except maybe their kids. ( )
  Schmerguls | Jan 29, 2008 |
Christopher Dodd, running for the Democratic Presidential nomination in 2008, decided to publish his father's letters home from Nuremberg. Christopher Dodd's father, Thomas, traveled to Germany to eventually act as one of the chief prosecutors for the United States in the trials of former German officials after World War II. During the course of his stay, which lasted over a year, Thomas Dodd wrote daily letters home to his wife Grace. Though the letters have been prepared for over 10 years, publication in 2007 gave Christopher Dodd a chance to briefly address some of his platform issues in his approximately eighty page introduction.

The bulk of the content of the book however consists of Thomas Dodd's letters. These letters provide a very personal account of not only the trials, but of the state of Europe after the closing chapters of World War II. As a study in the trials, it really should be placed behind a more factual oriented history, yet it could serve as good companion to a study of the trials as it addresses more of the politics behind the scenes both within the attorneys representing the U. S. as well as between the four nations participating in conducting the trials.

The real problem with this book is only in the amount of unrelated material that consumes a large portion of the letters. Much of the letters addressed Dodd's day to day affairs, his loneliness and general unhappiness at being separated from his family for such a long period of time. There is also a good deal of correspondence regarding the internals of the politics of the Connecticut state Democratic party in their preparation for Senate and Gubernatorial races in 1946. In terms of a story of human interest these things are important, so the safe choice is to publish the letters un-edited, but for someone interested only in the history of the trials it adds some unrelated bulk.

Aside from trial details and personal matters, Dodd's account of his stay is most enlightening regarding the state of Europe after the war. In fairly plain language that is free from hyperbole, Dodd's letters portray a Europe torn and devastated. Food and basic supply shortages, cities nearly leveled to the ground, and Russians plundering Eastern Germany while generally conducting affairs in a way not dissimilar from the Nazi men who were on trial. This along with Dodd's accounts of some of the atrocities the Germans committed during and immediately prior to the war do make you realize how far away from that we are as Americans. The encroachment we have seen on our civil liberties during the first decade of the 21st century are important and should be monitored vigilantly. Yet comparing them to what Europe saw during the 1930's and 1940's can make them seem trivial, regardless of how the chicken little crowd reacts to them. If for no other reason, this book was useful for providing that small check on reality. ( )
  JDubba | Jan 5, 2008 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307381161, Hardcover)

For some sixty years, the Nuremberg trials have demonstrated the resolve of the United States and its fellow Allied victors of the Second World War to uphold the principles of dispassionate justice and the rule of law even when cries of vengeance threatened to carry the day. In the summer of 1945, soon after the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany, Thomas J. Dodd, the father of U.S. Senator Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut, traveled to the devastated city of Nuremberg to serve as a staff lawyer in this unprecedented trial for crimes against humanity. Thanks to his agile legal mind and especially to his skills at interrogating the defendants—including such notorious figures as Hermann Göring, Alfred Rosenberg, Albert Speer, Joachim von Ribbentrop, and Rudolf Hess—he quickly rose to become the number two prosecutor in the U.S. contingent.

Over the course of fifteen months, Dodd described his efforts and his impressions of the proceedings in nightly letters to his wife, Grace. The letters remained in the Dodd family archives, unexamined, for decades. When Christopher Dodd, who followed his father’s path to the Senate, sat down to read the letters, he was overwhelmed by their intimacy, by the love story they unveil, by their power to paint vivid portraits of the accused war criminals, and by their insights into the historical importance of the trials.

Along with Christopher Dodd’s reflections on his father’s life and career, and on the inspiration that good people across the world have long taken from the event that unfolded in the courtroom at Nuremberg, where justice proved to be stronger than the most unspeakable evil, these letters give us a fresh, personal, and often unique perspective on a true turning point in the history of our time. In today’s world, with new global threats once again put-ting our ideals to the test, Letters from Nuremberg reminds us that fear and retribution are not the only bases for confrontation. As Christopher Dodd says here, “Now, as in the era of Nuremberg, this nation should never tailor its eternal principles to the conflict of the moment, for if we do so, we will be shadowing those we seek to overcome.”

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:43:03 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"For some sixty years, the Nuremberg trials have demonstrated the resolve of the United States and its fellow Allied victors of the Second World War to uphold the principles of dispassionate justice and the rule of law even when cries of vengeance threatened to carry the day. In the summer of 1945, soon after the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany, Thomas J. Dodd, the father of U.S. Senator Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut, traveled to the devastated city of Nuremberg to serve as a staff lawyer in this unprecedented trial for crimes against humanity. Thanks to his agile legal mind and especially to his skills at interrogating the defendants - including such notorious figures as Hermann Goring, Alfred Rosenberg, Albert Speer, Joachim von Ribbentrop, and Rudolf Hess - he quickly rose to become the number two prosecutor in the U.S. contingent." "Over the course of fifteen months, Dodd described his efforts and his impressions of the proceedings in nightly letters to his wife, Grace. The letters remained in the Dodd family archives, unexamined, for decades. When Christopher Dodd, who followed his father's path to the Senate, sat down to read the letters, he was overwhelmed by their intimacy, by the love story they unveil, by their power to paint vivid portraits of the accused war criminals, and by their insights into the historical importance of the trials."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 wanted3 pay3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.64)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 3
3.5 1
4 2
4.5
5 1

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,970,856 books! | Top bar: Always visible