HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Food Encyclopedia: Over 8,000 Ingredients, Tools, Techniques and…

by Jacques L. Rolland

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
261676,996 (2)None
The most comprehensive and authoritative food encyclopedia available. Cooking can be a wondrous adventure, especially with a thorough understanding of the history and origins of food, a grasp of the cultures and environments involved, and an appreciation for those who over the years have played key roles in its development. The Food Encyclopedia has 8,000 entries, with cross-reference on foods, wines, beverages, cooking methods and techniques, and biographies of prominent people. It is the most comprehensive food reference in the marketplace today, featuring 500 stunning illustrations and photographs alongside its extensive coverage. In the entry on arugula, for example, we read that it is an assertive salad green, eruca sativa, has a peppery taste somewhere between nasturtium and watercress, and is used frequently in Mediterranean dishes. The ancient Romans used both the leaves and the seeds of arugula. Thomas Jefferson, in detailed written instructions to his gardener at Monticello, listed arugula as essential for his kitchen garden. Included are more than 150 biographies of prominent individuals -- chefs, authors and inventors -- who have contributed to food and its lore. Chefs include Julia Child, Paul Bocuse, Alice Waters and Michael Stadtlander. Among the notable authors are Elizabeth David, M.F.K. Fisher and Irma S. Rombauer. The inventors include Carl Sontheimer the developer of the Cuisinart food processor. Becoming more familiar with words and terms, and finding out the background behind a food or an ingredient, ensures a well-prepared dish and adds to the pleasure of serving it. For any cook, this authoritative and fascinating book is an outstanding reference and cookbook companion.… (more)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

I selected The Food Encyclopedia: Over 8,000 Ingredients, Tools, Techniques and People based entirely on its cover -- the ripe pears against the shadowy blue background looked so luscious and tasty, I just had to pick this book up. And, wow, do I regret that impulse.

This is a food encyclopedia, yes? Where are all the cross-references? Can't have a decent encyclopedia without cross-references, I tell you what. This encyclopedia's entry for "doughnut peach" tells me that this fruit is also called "saucer peach," "galaxy peach," or "Saturn peach," but it cannot be found in this book under any of those names. My grocer calls them "Saturn" peaches -- I would never find them in this book if I only knew them by that name. Going to the "peach" entry wouldn't be helpful -- it doesn't cross-reference with the "donut peach" entry, either. It doesn't even mention them as a variety. I could, I guess browse the book, hoping to stumble upon an illustration of the "Saturn peach," but this book is so big and the illustrations so poor, I would probably just go to the Internet.

Speaking of illustrations, these are very poor. There aren't enough of them and they are all color drawings rather than photographs. This wouldn't be so annoying if they were better quality drawings, but they are not. A few even seem blurry to me. Going back to peaches -- the peach illustration is terrible. I could just as well be looking a picture of an orange. The text tells me peaches are freestone or clingstone and are sold as yellow or white varieties -- a cutaway illustration of the inside of the peach showing color and stone variations would have been useful.

Still, I know what a peach looks like. I don't know what parsley root looks like and, since "the leaves and roots of the wild parsley look-a-like, poison hemlock, are deadly poisonous" I would really like to know. Yes, yes, probably never going to forage for wild parsley root -- but it would be nice to know, anyway. That's why I read these books. Not because I need to know, but because I want to. Therefore, I'm looking to find out more about things I am not familiar with -- patra leaf rather than pastry cutter.

And that, perhaps, is the reason this book disappoints. It tries to cover too much. Not just fruits and vegetables, but also tools, techniques, and people. There is no way to cover all that well in a single 701 page volume. It winds up playing the tease and leaves this reader rather cranky and put out. ( )
  lagardner | May 1, 2010 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

The most comprehensive and authoritative food encyclopedia available. Cooking can be a wondrous adventure, especially with a thorough understanding of the history and origins of food, a grasp of the cultures and environments involved, and an appreciation for those who over the years have played key roles in its development. The Food Encyclopedia has 8,000 entries, with cross-reference on foods, wines, beverages, cooking methods and techniques, and biographies of prominent people. It is the most comprehensive food reference in the marketplace today, featuring 500 stunning illustrations and photographs alongside its extensive coverage. In the entry on arugula, for example, we read that it is an assertive salad green, eruca sativa, has a peppery taste somewhere between nasturtium and watercress, and is used frequently in Mediterranean dishes. The ancient Romans used both the leaves and the seeds of arugula. Thomas Jefferson, in detailed written instructions to his gardener at Monticello, listed arugula as essential for his kitchen garden. Included are more than 150 biographies of prominent individuals -- chefs, authors and inventors -- who have contributed to food and its lore. Chefs include Julia Child, Paul Bocuse, Alice Waters and Michael Stadtlander. Among the notable authors are Elizabeth David, M.F.K. Fisher and Irma S. Rombauer. The inventors include Carl Sontheimer the developer of the Cuisinart food processor. Becoming more familiar with words and terms, and finding out the background behind a food or an ingredient, ensures a well-prepared dish and adds to the pleasure of serving it. For any cook, this authoritative and fascinating book is an outstanding reference and cookbook companion.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (2)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,479,263 books! | Top bar: Always visible