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The Wolf of Wall Street by Jordan Belfort
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The Wolf of Wall Street (2007)

by Jordan Belfort

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An awful book. Badly written, a protagonist with no redeeming features and too little focus on the mechanics of what he actually did. Perhaps because he never really understood it himself. Scores 1.5 because somehow I managed to read all 500+ pages. ( )
  rlangston | Apr 10, 2014 |
One thing you have to hand Jordan Belfort, he is quite the self promoter. His books remind me a lot of Lance Armstrong's many promo books before his downfall. This book encompasses Belfort's odyssey through his drug drenched ride to fame and fortune while bilking thousands out of hundreds of millions. The self proclaimed "Wolf of Wall Street" was invincible and continues his ride with books and a movie, and as a motivational speaker and sales trainer. His self indulgent lifestyle eventually costs him his marriage but he gets off relatively unscathed with a very light sentence at a country club Fed prison for "cooperating." Through it all he demonstrates his key trait, no remorse for what he did. Unfortunately he may be a role model for some. ( )
  knightlight777 | Apr 4, 2014 |
If I never see the phrase loamy loins again, I will be a very happy lady. ( )
1 vote briony | Feb 4, 2014 |
After having read The Bonfire of the Vanities, I'm curious whether Jordan Belfort had not also read it before writing his memoir, because his vernacular is very similar to Bonfire's Wall Street character. "Loamy loins", "Master of the Universe", same reasoning behind his philandering, etc.

Hmm..

(Update 12/21/13): After having read Belfort's second book he talked about having gotten inspiration for his writing style from The Bonfire of the Vanities, so there you go. ( )
  tikilights | Jan 19, 2014 |
I chose this book because I thoroughly enjoyed [The Buy Side] by Tourney Duff, a loveable screw up who I rooted for from beginning to end. But Jordan Belfont in The Wolf of Wall Street is a different character. He's a real asshole but you keep reading out of sheer curiosity about Wall Street. Although I follow the business community, I wasn't familiar with his story - which made the book suspenseful until the crooked end. I also enjoyed the B-School analysis of how to run Steve Madden's shoe company. And I have to admit, I warmed to Belfont toward the end. I like second chances, but if I met him today, I think he's still an asshole - utterly unredeemable. ( )
  ShavonJones | Jan 19, 2014 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553384775, Paperback)

By day he made thousands of dollars a minute. By night he spent it as fast as he could, on drugs, sex, and international globe-trotting. From the binge that sank a 170-foot motor yacht, crashed a Gulfstream jet, and ran up a $700,000 hotel tab, to the wife and kids who waited for him at home, and the fast-talking, hard-partying young stockbrokers who called him king and did his bidding, here, in his own inimitable words, is the story of the ill-fated genius they called…

In the 1990s Jordan Belfort, former kingpin of the notorious investment firm Stratton Oakmont, became one of the most infamous names in American finance: a brilliant, conniving stock-chopper who led his merry mob on a wild ride out of the canyons of Wall Street and into a massive office on Long Island. Now, in this astounding and hilarious tell-all autobiography, Belfort narrates a story of greed, power, and excess no one could invent.
Reputedly the prototype for the film Boiler Room, Stratton Oakmont turned microcap investing into a wickedly lucrative game as Belfort’s hyped-up, coked-out brokers browbeat clients into stock buys that were guaranteed to earn obscene profits–for the house. But an insatiable appetite for debauchery, questionable tactics, and a fateful partnership with a breakout shoe designer named Steve Madden would land Belfort on both sides of the law and into a harrowing darkness all his own.

From the stormy relationship Belfort shared with his model-wife as they ran a madcap household that included two young children, a full-time staff of twenty-two, a pair of bodyguards, and hidden cameras everywhere—even as the SEC and FBI zeroed in on them—to the unbridled hedonism of his office life, here is the extraordinary story of an ordinary guy who went from hustling Italian ices at sixteen to making hundreds of millions. Until it all came crashing down…


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:41:38 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Belfort, who founded one of the first and largest chop shop brokerage firms in 1987, was banned from the securities business for life by 1994, and later went to jail for fraud and money-laundering, delivers a memoir that reads like fiction. It covers his decade of success with straightforward accounts of how he worked with managers of obscure companies to acquire large amounts of stock with minimal public disclosure, then pumped up the price and sold it, so he and the insiders made large profits while public investors usually lost. Profits were laundered through purchase of legitimate businesses and cash deposits in Swiss banks.… (more)

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