HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make…
Loading...

Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things (original 2002; edition 2002)

by William McDonough, Michael Braungart

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,340215,783 (4.09)13
Member:JustinTheLibrarian
Title:Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
Authors:William McDonough
Other authors:Michael Braungart
Info:North Point Press (2002), Edition: 1st, Paperback, 208 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work details

Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things by William McDonough (2002)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 13 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
This was great a book and really is a must read. I read this for a class, and I enjoyed exploring and discussing the ideas presented within but unfortunately the text was a bit disappointing. I felt as if some of the arguments could have been presented more convincingly. As someone else put it: "Its ideas merit five stars, but the text sags a bit and tends to repeat itself a lot, thereby losing some power." ( )
  AaronKappel | May 22, 2014 |
I have mixed feelings about this book. On one hand, it was interesting and inspiring to read about the authors' firm's eco-efficient designs. But for the most part it still seemed pretty pie in the sky--great ideas that unfortunately aren't feasible at this time.

I also don't like the authors' premise that it's possible to live an ecologically sound life without reducing consumption. It sounds appealing to believe that one shouldn't have to sacrifice one's lifestyle in order to fix the planet, but isn't uncritical consumption what got us into this environmental mess in the first place? ( )
  thatotter | Feb 4, 2014 |
Great book. Liked it a lot. ( )
  bibliosk8er | Aug 14, 2012 |
The biggest thing about this book is the material used for the pages. It says it's a recyclable plastic. Well and good. But no where does it say how to appropriately dispose of it so it can be recycled.
Major detraction.
  2wonderY | Feb 11, 2012 |
I'm a freecycle/recycle/thriftshop geek and William McDonough's book, written with his colleague, the German chemist Michael Braungart, is a manifesto calling for the transformation of human industry through ecologically intelligent design. ( )
  Dithreabhach | Feb 10, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
William McDonoughprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Braungart, MichaelAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
'The world will not evolve past its current state of crisis by using the same thinking that created the situation.'
Albert Einstein
'Glance at the sun.
See the moon and the stars.
Gaze at the beauty of earth's greenings.
Now, think.'
Hildegard von Bingen
'What you people call your natural resources our people call our relatives.'
Oren Lyons, faith keeper of the Onondanga
Dedication
To our families, and to all of the children of all species for all time
First words
In the twenty-some years since I came up with the phrase "cradle to cradle", it has become as complicated as a musical score.
Quotations
We did not design the materials of this book. After years of analyzing and testing polymers to replace paper, we were delighted when designer Janine James happened to mention our search to Charlie Melcher of Melcher Media. Melcher was working with a paer adapted from a polymer blend that had been used to label detergent bottles, so that the labels could be recycled along with the bottles instead of being burned off...When Michael tested it, he found that it off-gassed similarly to a conventional book. But it could be recycled, and more to the point, it has the potential to be upcycled: dissolved and remade as polymer of high quality and usefulness.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
This is the 2008 edition (new content) of the Cradle to Cradle work shown as co-authored by William McDonough elsewhere on LibraryThing.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Book description
Paper or plastic? Neither, say William McDonough and Michael Braungart. Why settle for the least harmful alternative when we could have something that is better--say, edible grocery bags! In Cradle to Cradle, the authors present a manifesto calling for a new industrial revolution, one that would render both traditional manufacturing and traditional environmentalism obsolete. Recycling, for instance, is actually "downcycling," creating hybrids of biological and technical "nutrients" which are then unrecoverable and unusable. The authors, an architect and a chemist, want to eliminate the concept of waste altogether, while preserving commerce and allowing for human nature. They offer several compelling examples of corporations that are not just doing less harm--they're actually doing some good for the environment and their neighborhoods, and making more money in the process. Cradle to Cradle is a refreshing change from the intractable environmental conflicts that dominate headlines. It's a handbook for 21st-century innovation and should be required reading for business hotshots and environmental activists. --Therese Littleton
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0865475873, Paperback)

Paper or plastic? Neither, say William McDonough and Michael Braungart. Why settle for the least harmful alternative when we could have something that is better--say, edible grocery bags! In Cradle to Cradle, the authors present a manifesto calling for a new industrial revolution, one that would render both traditional manufacturing and traditional environmentalism obsolete. Recycling, for instance, is actually "downcycling," creating hybrids of biological and technical "nutrients" which are then unrecoverable and unusable. The authors, an architect and a chemist, want to eliminate the concept of waste altogether, while preserving commerce and allowing for human nature. They offer several compelling examples of corporations that are not just doing less harm--they're actually doing some good for the environment and their neighborhoods, and making more money in the process. Cradle to Cradle is a refreshing change from the intractable environmental conflicts that dominate headlines. It's a handbook for 21st-century innovation and should be required reading for business hotshots and environmental activists. --Therese Littleton

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:36:31 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

A manifesto for a radically different philosophy and practice of manufacture and environmentalism. "Reduce, reuse, recycle," urge environmentalists--in other words, do more with less in order to minimize damage. As this book argues, however, this approach perpetuates a one-way "cradle to grave" manufacturing model that casts off as much as 90 percent of the materials it uses as waste, much of it toxic. Why not challenge the notion that human industry must inevitably damage the natural world, they ask. Products might be designed so that, after their useful life, they provide nourishment for something new. Elaborating their principles from experience (re)designing everything from carpeting to corporate campuses, the authors make an exciting and viable case for change.--From publisher description.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
4 avail.
555 wanted
4 pay3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.09)
0.5
1 2
1.5 2
2 7
2.5 2
3 42
3.5 11
4 88
4.5 9
5 93

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,690,817 books! | Top bar: Always visible