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A Dangerous Place: California's Unsettling…
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A Dangerous Place: California's Unsettling Fate (edition 2003)

by Marc Reisner

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1493118,481 (3.79)1
Member:comstockhouse
Title:A Dangerous Place: California's Unsettling Fate
Authors:Marc Reisner
Info:Pantheon (2003), Hardcover, 192 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:california, earthquake, .main

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A Dangerous Place: California's Unsettling Fate by Marc Reisner

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Too much time is taken up in this book with the author's fictional scenario, which, though interesting in places, drags on and is not helpful in dealing with his subject matter. One gets the feeling that he had too little information, and felt the need to pad the book with the fiction. If so, this could only be the result of incomplete research, since there is a multitude of information out there on earthquakes, and the subject of earthquakes along the San Andreas fault could fill several volumes. ( )
  Devil_llama | Apr 20, 2011 |
The late Marc Reisner, author of Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water, tells Californians the truth about our strange choice to settle on seismically unstable ground. As he details it, San Francisco’s port made it an inevitable site for a major city, but Los Angeles was created out of nothing by land speculators--in both cases, these were the worst spots in the state for cities. Once a major city is established, it’s almost always rebuilt rather than moved, no matter how bad the damage or how grave the danger. The final third of the book is taken up with a graphic description of the effects of a 7.2 earthquake--far from a worst-case scenario--on the Bay Area. It’s an eye-opener that makes Sacramento look like a pretty good place to be--even though we’re not exactly shake-proof, either. (Reviewed in SN&R, 8-14-03, www.newsreview.com/sacramento/Content?oid=15642) ( )
  KelMunger | Jul 23, 2007 |
Mark Reisner’s last book (published posthumously) is high on my list of books my mother should never read. California, it’s true, is a dangerous place, a place where no one sane would live. Reisner’s story of California’s explosive growth in the face of harsh environmental conditions and threats is engaging, amusing, and well worth seeking out. Reisner’s death in 2000 is a great loss. ( )
  cmc | Apr 25, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0142003832, Paperback)

Writing with a signature command of his subject and with compelling resonance, Marc Reisner leads us through California’s improbable rise from a largely desert land to the most populated state in the nation, fueled by an economic engine more productive than all of Africa. Reisner believes that the success of this last great desert civilization hinges on California’s denial of its own inescapable fate: Both the Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay areas sit astride two of the most violently seismic zones on the planet. The earthquakes that have already rocked California were, according to Reisner, a mere prologue to a future cataclysm that will result in immense destruction. Concluding with a hypothetical but chillingly realistic description of what such a disaster would look like, A Dangerous Place mixes science, history, and cultural commentary in a haunting work of profound importance.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:15 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"In A Dangerous Place, Marc Reisner leads us through California's improbable history and rise from a largely desert land to the most populated state in the nation, fueled by an economic engine more productive than all of Africa. Reisner believes that the achievement of this, the last great desert civilization, hinges on California's denial of its own inescapable fate. Both the Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay areas sit astride two of the most violently seismic zones on the planet. The earthquakes that have already rocked California were, according to Reisner, mere prologues to a future cataclysm that will result in destruction of such magnitude that the only recourse will be to rebuild from the ground up. Reisner concludes A Dangerous Place with a hypothetical but chillingly realistic description of such a disaster and its horrifying after effects."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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