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The Black Tulip (1850)

by Alexandre Dumas, père

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,626467,684 (3.62)75
The Black Tulip, written by Alexandre Dumas père and published in 1850, is a historical novel placed in the time of Tulipmania in the Netherlands. The story begins with a historical event, the 1672 lynching of the Dutch Grand Pensionary (roughly equivalent to a modern Prime Minister) Johan de Witt and his brother Cornelis, by a wild mob of their own countrymen, considered by many as one of the most painful episodes in Dutch history, described by Dumas with a dramatic intensity.The main plot line, involving fictional characters, takes place in the following eighteen months; only gradually does the reader understand its connection with the killing of the de Witt brothers.The city of Haarlem, Netherlands, has set a prize of 100,000 guilders to the person who can grow a black tulip, sparking competition between the country's best gardeners to win the money, honour and fame. Only the city's oldest citizens remember the Tulip Mania thirty years prior, and the citizens throw themselves into the competition. The young and bourgeois Cornelius van Baerle has almost succeeded but is suddenly thrown into the Loevestein prison. . .Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), also known as Alexandre Dumas, père, was a French writer, best known for his historical novels of high adventure. Translated into nearly 100 languages, these have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. Many of his novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After, and The Vicomte de Bragelonne: Ten Years Later were originally published as serials. His novels have been adapted since the early twentieth century for nearly 200 films. [Elib]… (more)
  1. 10
    The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas père (2below)
    2below: These stories share some key themes and plot elements. It's not nearly as epic as The Count of Monte Cristo but makes for an interesting comparison.
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» See also 75 mentions

English (45)  Italian (1)  All languages (46)
Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
Borrowed this from the library on a bit of a whim, as most of my books are currently in storage - wanted to read something rather more classic-vintage, and this one caught my eye. I was looking for The Count of Monte Cristo originally, which was out, but this seemed to be a good size to carry round.

The story is pretty easy-reading - a bit more 'classic romantic' than I'd usually read, but it was told well and I found myself getting sucked into this more as it went on, especially at some of the tenser points. I can imagine it making a decent film.

Overall, enjoyed it and hope to return to Dumas soon.

( )
  6loss | Nov 7, 2019 |
Non è il migliore libro di Dumas, ma è comunque una bellissima storia d'amore.
Buona lettura ( )
  elerwen | May 29, 2019 |
Consider me befuddled. William of Orange is depicted in The Black Tulip as an almost pantomime villain, although bereft of curling moustaches. Whereas Neal Stephenson characterizes Willie as a paragliding badass who saves England in the Glorious Revolution. I’ll ignore period politics and remain bemused, which is an appropriate way to savor this novel. Dumas is masterful at maintaining suspense and creating concurrent narratives that fall into convenient heap for a happy conclusion.


I should add that the thought on horticulture were engaging, though the political prism was never elucidated. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
A nice blend of historical fiction, romance and adventure - just what I expect from Dumas! The adventure isn't quite up to the level of The Three Musketeers being more intrigue than actual adventure but it was still fun. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jan 25, 2018 |
M100 General Works
  TLH7718 | Dec 15, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (16 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dumas, Alexandre, pèreprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Arzadun, AndresTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bakker, MargotTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bestall, A. E.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boutégège, RégineAuthorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Conrad, PeterIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Coward, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Demmler, FranzTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fitz-Gerald, S. J. AdairTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Flores, EnriqueIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fontaine, C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fusco, FedericoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Girard, MarcelIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gosse, EdmundEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hernúñez, PolluxTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lammers, FransIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Connor, A.J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Octave, UzanneIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Quanjer, Th.A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Redman, Ben RayIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reinoso, Caridad DiazTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tirranen, HerttaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zemmler, FranzTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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On the 20th of August, 1672, the city of the Hague, always so lively, so neat, and so trim that one might believe every day to be Sunday, with its shady park, with its tall trees, spreading over its Gothic houses, with its canals like large mirrors, in which its steeples and its almost Eastern cupolas are reflected,—the city of the Hague, the capital of the Seven United Provinces, was swelling in all its arteries with a black and red stream of hurried, panting, and restless citizens, who, with their knives in their girdles, muskets on their shoulders, or sticks in their hands, were pushing on to the Buytenhof, a terrible prison, the grated windows of which are still shown, where, on the charge of attempted murder preferred against him by the surgeon Tyckelaer, Cornelius de Witt, the brother of the Grand Pensionary of Holland was confined.
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“To despise flowers is to offend God.”
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The Black Tulip, written by Alexandre Dumas père and published in 1850, is a historical novel placed in the time of Tulipmania in the Netherlands. The story begins with a historical event, the 1672 lynching of the Dutch Grand Pensionary (roughly equivalent to a modern Prime Minister) Johan de Witt and his brother Cornelis, by a wild mob of their own countrymen, considered by many as one of the most painful episodes in Dutch history, described by Dumas with a dramatic intensity.The main plot line, involving fictional characters, takes place in the following eighteen months; only gradually does the reader understand its connection with the killing of the de Witt brothers.The city of Haarlem, Netherlands, has set a prize of 100,000 guilders to the person who can grow a black tulip, sparking competition between the country's best gardeners to win the money, honour and fame. Only the city's oldest citizens remember the Tulip Mania thirty years prior, and the citizens throw themselves into the competition. The young and bourgeois Cornelius van Baerle has almost succeeded but is suddenly thrown into the Loevestein prison. . .Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), also known as Alexandre Dumas, père, was a French writer, best known for his historical novels of high adventure. Translated into nearly 100 languages, these have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. Many of his novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After, and The Vicomte de Bragelonne: Ten Years Later were originally published as serials. His novels have been adapted since the early twentieth century for nearly 200 films. [Elib]

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This story about 1672-The Netherlands. In November 1671, a prise was offered with black tulip. If someone make black tulip, 100000 scilders will pay the person. Cornelius tried to grow the black tulip because he like tulips, and he get three black tulip's bulbs. But one day, he was caught as a prisoner...
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