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Loud and Clear by Anna Quindlen
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Loud and Clear

by Anna Quindlen

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Intelligent, wise essays that made me nod my head vigorously - Yes! - and fell like marching, for something. ( )
  LaurieRKing | Mar 10, 2010 |
This is a collection of Quindlen's newspaper columns. Loud and Clear is typical Anna Quindlen: funny, thought-provoking, sad. I laughed out loud when she recounted the childhood hairdo's and the Tonette perms. They really did smell awful. I agreed with her columns about abortion. I, too, am tired of the rhetoric by individuals (men) who will never face pregnancy. I was choked up when reading about the 9/11 attacks and the aftermath. She writes what is on her mind, gives her opinion and doesn't apologize for it. We can agree or disagree. ( )
  LeHack | Feb 11, 2008 |
This is a collection of columns. Most fit with middle-class feminism. It includes her coverage of the events of Sept. 11, 2001. I kept reading it, but there isn't anything memorable here.
  franoscar | Jan 5, 2008 |
I have found two columnists with whom I cannot recall disagreeing with any of their written opinions (not that that in itself is a requirement for me to enjoy them): Molly Ivins and now Anna Quindlen. Ivins and Quindlen are probably mutual admirers, but they approach their writing from different directions. Ivins looks at the policies and ideas themselves. Quindlen focuses on the people they impact. Overall I prefer Quindlen's approach. And many of her columns, unlike Ivins, reveal that inner part of our beings that give birth to our ideas and opinions. I was particularly moved by her essays dealing with the impact of her mother's death when she (Anna) was 19; It did much to settle the roiling emotions still residing in me from Mom's death a year ago. What I like about Quindlen (and Ivins) is that she helps me articulate feelings and ideas I've had for a long time. ( )
  burnit99 | Feb 16, 2007 |
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On the morning of September 11, 2001, I was doing what I do as well as anyone I know: that is, not writing.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812970276, Paperback)

In this remarkable book, Anna Quindlen, one of America’s favorite novelists and a Pulitzer Prize– winning columnist, once again gives us wisdom, opinions, insights, and reflections about current events and modern life. “Always insightful, rooted in everyday experience and common sense...Quindlen is so good that even when you disagree with what she says, you still love the way she says it,” said People magazine about her number one New York Times bestseller Thinking Out Loud, and the same can be said about Loud and Clear.

With her trademark insight and her special ability to convey the impact public events have on ordinary lives, Quindlen here combines commentary on American society and the world at large with reflections on being a woman, a writer, and a mother. In these pieces, first written for Newsweek and The New York Times, Loud and Clear takes on topics ranging from social change to raising children, from the political and emotional aftermath of September 11 to personal values, from the impact on individuals of global events to the growth that can be gained by spending summer days staring into the middle distance. Grounding the public in the private, connecting people to each other and to the greater world, Quindlen encourages us to develop authentic lives, even as she serves as a catalyst for political and social change.

“Anna Quindlen’s beat is life, and she’s one hell of a terrific reporter,” said Susan Isaacs, and Quindlen’s unique qualities of understanding and discernment, everywhere evident in her previous bestsellers, including A Short Guide to a Happy Life and Living Out Loud, can be found on every page of this provocative and inspiring book.


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(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:43 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"With her trademark insight and her special ability to convey the impact public events have on ordinary lives, Quindlen here combines commentary on American society and the world at large with reflections on being a woman, a writer, and a mother. In these pieces, first written for Newsweek and The New York Times, Loud and Clear takes on topics ranging from social change to raising children, from the political and emotional aftermath of September 11 to personal values, from the impact on individuals of global events to the growth that can be gained by spending summer days staring into the middle distance. Grounding the public in the private, connecting people to each other and to the greater world, Quindlen encourages us to develop authentic lives, even as she serves as a catalyst for political and social change."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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