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The Gates of Dawn by Robert Newcomb
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Blood. People with special blood. Endowed blood. Plot point. Endowed blood. Endowed blood. Endowed blood. Endowed blood. Endowed blood. Similar plot point. Endowed blood. Endowed blood. You get the idea.

It was promising at first, but it started running into the same problems the author's first novel runs into and unfortunately, this novel doesn't overcome them either. The ideas and setting are interesting, the characters have potential. But it gets all too repetitive all too soon, and the author manages to beat the phrase "endowed blood" well into the dead horse stage and beyond. It gets literally painful to read when the same phrase pops up for the 65th time in *one* *single* *chapter*. In the end, I just stopped reading because of this. I wanted to go on, but... Simplistic plot and narrative structure plus "Endowed blood" repeated to nausea - I just couldn't keep reading. ( )
  guy-montag | Jun 2, 2009 |
Books On Tape, Inc.
  DJS316180 | Dec 31, 1969 |
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For my parents, Harry and Muriel
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He reached up slowly to feel the thick, warm fluid at the side of his head, the fluid he both loved and hated so intensely.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0345448944, Hardcover)

The Gates of Dawn, sequel to Robert Newcomb's debut, The Fifth Sorceress, is somewhat repetitive and clunky, but significantly superior to its predecessor. Most epic fantasy fans will thrill to the sequel's action-packed plot and Newcomb's vivid imagination. However, feminists may want to avoid The Gates of Dawn, since its large cast has only three semi-important female characters (all passive). The squeamish should note that Newcomb can be very tough on his characters, and that the magic of his fantasy world depends on blood--sometimes a lot of blood.

Prince Tristan, the Chosen One of ancient prophecy, has defeated the vicious Sisters of the Coven, but at enormous cost. Thousands have been slaughtered, his twin sister is gravely ill, they're both in hiding, and the Chosen One's vast magical power is of little use--he is still untrained. If these aren't troubles enough, Prince Tristan has an active, deadly enemy he doesn't even know exists: a trained wizard who is, astonishingly, even more powerful than the Chosen One. The hidden wizard has an intimate connection to Tristan that the prince could never have imagined. And he is restoring life to the evil souls of the still-potent Guild of Heretics, an act that requires raising the notorious Gates of Dawn and consecrating them with magically endowed blood--the blood of the Chosen One, Prince Tristan. --Cynthia Ward

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:48:32 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Forced to kill his beloved father in order to defeat an evil sorceress, Prince Tristan of the kingdom of Eutracia finds himself a wanted man in a lawless land and is challenged to battle insidious coven monsters.

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