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Sun and moon, ice and snow by Jessica Day…
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Sun and moon, ice and snow (edition 2008)

by Jessica Day George

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6105515,985 (3.77)40
Member:gail208
Title:Sun and moon, ice and snow
Authors:Jessica Day George
Info:New York : Bloomsbury : Distributed to the trade by Macmillan, 2008.
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:fairy tales, polar bears, trolls, East of the Sun West of the Moon, Norway

Work details

Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow by Jessica Day George

  1. 30
    East by Edith Pattou (foggidawn)
    foggidawn: Two different treatments of the same fairy tale -- both very good!
  2. 10
    Breadcrumbs by Anne Ursu (Crazymamie)
    Crazymamie: Another fractured fairy tale. This one is a take on the Snow Queen with lots of literary references.
  3. 00
    Ice by Sarah Beth Durst (FutureMrsJoshGroban)
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» See also 40 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
2 stars means 'it was ok' and really, that's all it was to me.
The cover photo art promised more than it delivered, imo.
I much prefer the metaphorical, metaphysical, magical versions of [b:East of the Sun and West of the Moon|3325930|East of the Sun and West of the Moon|Kathleen Hague|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1211217866s/3325930.jpg|3363881]. This explained and elaborated way too much. And it dragged - the whole story could indeed be told in a picture book.

Also, I'm not sure who the audience is. It's def. marketed YA - but the fairy tale is (has always been) perfectly accessible to children, and there's nothing rated 'teen' or 'mature audiences' here. It's not rich or complex enough for experienced readers, imo, either. If it had a more child-friendly cover image and intent, I might have let my inner child read it, and she might have enjoyed it more than YA me did.

(Otoh, it usually doesn't matter which version of me reads a book. The best books appeal to *readers* universally - not children versus adults....) ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.

I won a giveaway over at Bookshop Talk for two books of my choice. How awesome is that, right? I know how awesome: very! I had read Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow many years before and loved it, so I knew this was the perfect time to re-read it and add the gorgeous book (seriously, look at that cover!) to my collection.

Jessica Day George is one of my favorite authors. I have read all of her books, and never met one I didn't like! She's a master at fairytale retellings and knows how to create some serious ambiance. Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow differs from her amazing Princess books in that it isn't so much a complete retelling of the original tale as it is an imaginative fleshing out. What kind of family would give up their daughter to a talking bear? Why would a troll princess be so determined to marry a human prince? And why would she be so enchanted by the heroine's skills with a carding comb that she would let her into the palace? George fills in the answers to these questions and more in a way that creates a rich story that still reads like a fairytale - but a fairytale with far more detail and logic than any original version of "East o' the Sun, West o' the Moon" has to offer.

This isn't really a book that can be analyzed too much. It's a fleshed-out fairytale, not a regular story where realistic characters and plausible motives are required. The beauty of this book, though, is that it stays perfectly true to its magical foundations while at the same time managing to feature a lovable and realistic heroine, and logical reasons for everything that happens (logical in a world containing magic and trolls, anyway). The book's fantastical beginning may leave you with a lot of questions, but I guarantee that by the end everything will be explained.

The only (very slight) quibble I have is with the lass's wolf Rollo. He behaves much too much like a regular human for my taste. However, I know that George can write a realistic canine character (just look Pippin in the Dragon trilogy!), so I realize this must have been a conscious choice. It fits in well with the fairytale tone of the story. If the lass can speak to animals, then why shouldn't her best friend be a wolf?

All in all, this is just such a beautiful book - starting with the gorgeous cover, and lasting all the way through to the end! I love how everything is explained away with at least fairly logical reasoning, but the magical feel of the story is never lost. George expanded the tale, instead of cutting it up and pasting it back together, and I really love the result. The old adage "if it's not broken, don't fix it" comes to mind. The story "East o' the Sun, West o' the Moon" was not broken, and it didn't need fixing. What it needed was for someone to color in the lines and fill it out. This is what George did, and she did a fantastic job! ( )
  Jaina_Rose | Mar 1, 2016 |
This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.

I won a giveaway over at Bookshop Talk for two books of my choice. How awesome is that, right? I know how awesome: very! I had read Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow many years before and loved it, so I knew this was the perfect time to re-read it and add the gorgeous book (seriously, look at that cover!) to my collection.

Jessica Day George is one of my favorite authors. I have read all of her books, and never met one I didn't like! She's a master at fairytale retellings and knows how to create some serious ambiance. Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow differs from her amazing Princess books in that it isn't so much a complete retelling of the original tale as it is an imaginative fleshing out. What kind of family would give up their daughter to a talking bear? Why would a troll princess be so determined to marry a human prince? And why would she be so enchanted by the heroine's skills with a carding comb that she would let her into the palace? George fills in the answers to these questions and more in a way that creates a rich story that still reads like a fairytale - but a fairytale with far more detail and logic than any original version of "East o' the Sun, West o' the Moon" has to offer.

This isn't really a book that can be analyzed too much. It's a fleshed-out fairytale, not a regular story where realistic characters and plausible motives are required. The beauty of this book, though, is that it stays perfectly true to its magical foundations while at the same time managing to feature a lovable and realistic heroine, and logical reasons for everything that happens (logical in a world containing magic and trolls, anyway). The book's fantastical beginning may leave you with a lot of questions, but I guarantee that by the end everything will be explained.

The only (very slight) quibble I have is with the lass's wolf Rollo. He behaves much too much like a regular human for my taste. However, I know that George can write a realistic canine character (just look Pippin in the Dragon trilogy!), so I realize this must have been a conscious choice. It fits in well with the fairytale tone of the story. If the lass can speak to animals, then why shouldn't her best friend be a wolf?

All in all, this is just such a beautiful book - starting with the gorgeous cover, and lasting all the way through to the end! I love how everything is explained away with at least fairly logical reasoning, but the magical feel of the story is never lost. Georgee expanded the tale, instead of cutting it up and pasting it back together, and I really love the result. The old adage "if it's not broken, don't fix it" comes to mind. The story "East o' the Sun, West o' the Moon" was not broken, and it didn't need fixing. What it needed was for someone to color in the lines and fill it out. This is what George did, and she did a fantastic job! ( )
  Jaina_Rose | Mar 1, 2016 |
I really liked the story up until the point where she talks to him when he is awake int he troll queen's castle and they act like they are in *super* love i just didn't see the build up for that. But it was a really good book. :) ( )
  readalot1992 | Oct 30, 2015 |
This is an amalgamation of several fairy tales including The Snow Queen. Jessica Day George has a great talent for taking well-known fairy tales and turning them into something new. I enjoyed this quite a lot. ( )
  TheMadHatters | Apr 6, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
As the nameless lass searches for the answers to the riddles that surround her and her loved ones, readers will find themselves engaged in the emotions and adventures that she faces.
added by Katya0133 | editSchool Library Journal, Caryl Soriano (Mar 1, 2008)
 
Mystery, adventure, the supernatural, and a touch of love are woven together to create a vivid, well-crafted, poetic fantasy.
added by Katya0133 | editBooklist, Frances Bradburn (Feb 1, 2008)
 
Rich in Norwegian lore and perfectly delicious to read.
added by Katya0133 | editKirkus Reviews (Dec 1, 2007)
 
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Epigraph
Dedication
For my parents: You gave me life, you gave me love, you gave me a plane ticket to Norway. Thank you.
First words
Long ago and far away in the land of ice and snow, there came a time when it seemed that winter would never end.
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Book description
When a great white bear promises untold riches to her family, the Lass agrees to go away with him. But the bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle. To unravel the mystery, the Lass sets out on a windswept journey beyond the edge of the world. Based on the Nordic legend East of the Sun, West of the Moon, with romantic echoes of Beauty and the Beast, this re-imagined story will leave fans of fantasy and fairy tale enchanted by Jessica Day George.
[retrieved from Amazon 1/19/2012]
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A girl travels east of the sun and west of the moon to free her beloved prince from a magic spell.

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