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Les Trois Mousquetaires by Alexandre Dumas
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Les Trois Mousquetaires (original 1844; edition 1932)

by Alexandre Dumas, Claude Schopp

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
11,837151224 (4.08)1 / 642
Member:justjim
Title:Les Trois Mousquetaires
Authors:Alexandre Dumas
Other authors:Claude Schopp
Info:Paris : R. Laffont, 1991.
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:France, French

Work details

The Three Musketeers by pere Alexandre Dumas (1844)

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English (133)  Dutch (5)  Spanish (4)  German (3)  French (3)  Swedish (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (150)
Showing 1-5 of 133 (next | show all)
The well-known story is worth the read. Very action packed and engaging. Written as though you were observing, not reading. Great book. Far better than any movie. ( )
  JVioland | Jul 14, 2014 |
I know. I know. One star?? A swashbuckling adventure novel beloved for a couple of centuries? Yeah, well.

I've tried to read this before. It had "me" written all over it: aforementioned buckling of swashes, romance and derring-do and so forth. But I never penetrated very far. There was a tone – perhaps to the particular translation I tried, perhaps to the work itself – that just put me off, exemplified by the instance of D'Artagnan selling the yellow horse after his father impressed upon him how he must never do so, and he promised faithfully that he would not. It was such a dishonorable, dishonest, ugly thing to do, in a book I had expected to be dripping with honor – and it was just the beginning.

Last year I finally went with the audiobook, on the theory that classics that have not held a huge amount of interest for me go down better read aloud. I hold the reader, John Lee, responsible for my being able to finish it with as much tolerance as I did; if I’d been just reading words on a page I think it would have ended up in the trash by page 200. I hated this. I truly, deeply hated this. I’ve seen at least a couple of movie versions; I’ve enjoyed them, somewhat, as frothy swashbucklers, of course. I always expected the book to be better, though.

One of my two Goodreads comments on the book was:
"These people are all horrible - honorless, slutty morons. And this is a classic, beloved by schoolboys for - what, over 200 years? God help us."

And that’s my biggest problem with the book. Perhaps it was supposed to be ironic, some kind of commentary on honor and courage and standards and morality through the depiction of noble swordsmen who were actually men you wouldn’t trust alone with a coin or a woman. I don’t remember ever coming across that take on it, though.

Athos, Porthos, Aramis, D'Artagnan. These are the heroes I wanted to read about. The brave and loyal soldiers, the champions of right and defenders of womanhood and of France … I have no idea where my ideas came from – the movies, perhaps? What I found as I listened to the book was that Athos was a hypocritical prig, Aramis was a hypocritical pseudo-religious, Porthos was a gluttonous gambling dandy, and D'Artagnan a cocky young jackass. They were all four drunkards, given any opportunity; they were all womanizers, cuckolding widely and wildly, dropping whatever girl they had been bedding to move on without a pause or juggling as many as possible simultaneously. And the much-vaunted all-for-one loyalty? I didn't see it. Every single one of them was as likely to throw his buddies under the 18th century equivalent of a bus as to support them, or to leave them in assorted lurches. Then get a good laugh out of it. And the interactions between these four and the man-servants they could barely afford but NEEDED made The Comedy of Errors seem like a shining illustration of workplace harmony. It was depressing.

D'Artagnan in particular was a letdown. The whole situation of swiving the maid in the room adjacent to her mistress, and vice versa – I wanted to throttle him. A lot. For one thing – seriously? They've let prepubescent boys read this for centuries? Oh, that’s just awesome. So, buckling of swashes, romance and derring-do and so forth? The swashes were askew at best; the romance was not the way Anne Shirley defines it (nor me), the doing wasn’t so derring. I only made it through the whole thing because it was an audiobook with a good narrator, and because I gritted my teeth in determination to see it all the way through. It was a deep disappointment, and I hated it.

My other Goodreads comment:
“Chapter 67: Conclusion
Oh, thank God.” ( )
  Stewartry | Jun 28, 2014 |
Glad I re-read it in the original translation of 1946. There were lots of words I had to look up. I enjoyed the pace of the writing - the musketeers, and others, tearing around, always in a hurry, whether to find their next meal, or chasing a villain - and the short chapters complimented that perfectly. As a teenager I mostly missed the casual violence - enjoying the daring-do and romance - but I've certainly had to revise my opinions of what was my top favourite character Athos, I can't condone his treatment of his young wife no matter how wicked the lady becomes later. And I appreciate far more both Lady De Winter and the cardinal. Still it is a wonderful romp through Paris, France and London, and a heartfelt celebration of brotherhood and loyalty. ( )
  Ma_Washigeri | Jun 17, 2014 |
I think I do not like classics ( )
  soyoyo | May 15, 2014 |
What a fun adventure story! The four friends -- d'Artagnon, Athos, Porthos, and Aramis -- who have been a mainstaty of popular culture are a delight to read on the page. They don't necessarily have much depth of character, being more like delightful fools than grown adult men, but they are quite funny and they present their own definition of honor.

D'Artagnon is interesting, because he's the youngest of the group, fresh from his home village in the city of Paris and desiring to be a Musketeer. Despite being a total hot-head about some things, in some ways is hte most mature character of the group, kind of steering the others like wayward children. The one exception is Athos, who becomes a kind of father figure to d'Artagnon and helps guide him to the right course, when the situation gets over d'Artagnon's head. I really like their friendship.

The intrigues and adventures are great and keep you reading to find how how our heroes make it through. Though I was surprised to find that the Cardinal was not the supreme villain in the story. He is a dangerous foil for our characters, but it also sometimes their friend.

No, the major villain in the story is Milady de Winter, who has to be one of the original femme fatales. Seductive and dangerous, she lures men into traps, often having them enact her revenge for her. She's a really great villain and fun to read, even if she is a characture of evil womanhood (as most femme fatales are).

Anyway, superfun, if long read. And I'm totally interested in reading more of the d'Artagnon romances, especially The Man in the Iron Mask. ( )
  andreablythe | Apr 26, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (258 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dumas, Alexandre, pereprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dumas, Alexandremain authorall editionsconfirmed
Allen, Philip SchuylerTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baeza, JoseTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Barrow, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Barthel, SvenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blair, LowellTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blitt, BarryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Canon, Raymond R.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Charles, MiltonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dark, SidneyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gyllander, HugoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hochman, EleanorTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Le Clercq, JacquesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, JasmineCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Legrand, EdyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Leloir, MauriceIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lord, Isabel ElyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manganelli, GiorgioForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pevear, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Price, NormanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robson, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sigaux, GilbertEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sudley, Arthur PaulTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vallely, Henry E.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Van Swearingen, E.C.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zini, MarisaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
On the first Monday of April 1625, the market town of Meung, the birthplace of the author of the Roman de la Rose, was in a wild state of excitement.
Quotations
Athos: Well, D'Artagnan, if he doesn't come, it will be because of some delay. He may have tumbled off his horse or fallen on some slippery deck or ridden so fast against the wind that he is ill with a fever. Let us allow for the unforseen, gentlemen, since all is a gamble and life is a chaplet of minor miseries which, bead by bead, your philosopher tells with a smile. Be philosophers as I am, friends; sit down here and let us drink.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the main work for The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas peré. It should not be combined with any adaptation, abridgement, etc.

This work has also been published (complete and unabridged) under the ISBN 1-55902-983-8 by Aerie Publications, which apparently decided to break the rules and publish multiple classics under the same ISBN.
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
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Book description
AR 11.3, 42 Pts
------------------------
What luck! Young D'Artagnan had only been in Paris a few hours, and already he had been in three scrapes. Now it was time to fight his first duel.

He was surprised to see all three of his opponents show up together. "They call us the Three Inseparables," said one, with a bow." "Athos, Porthos, and Aramis."

D'Artagnan knew well who they were. They were the king's Musketeers - the braves swordsmen and the sharpest wits in all of France. He wanted nothing more than to be one of them, to fight at their side for the king and against injustice.
But first he had to defeat all three in a fair fight with swords, one at a time!
"En garde!" he said, drawing his sword....
Haiku summary
The young Gascon fights
The three inseperables
and becomes their friend
(Michael.Rimmer)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0451530039, Mass Market Paperback)

A major new translation of one of the most enduring works of literature, from the award- winning, bestselling co-translator of Anna Karenina—with a spectacular, specially illustrated cover

The Three Musketeers is the most famous of Alexandre Dumas’s historical novels and one of the most popular adventure stories ever written. Now in a bracing new translation, this swashbuckling epic chronicles the adventures of d’Artagnan, a brash young man from the countryside who journeys to Paris in 1625 hoping to become a musketeer and guard to King Louis XIII. Before long he finds treachery and court intrigue—and also three boon companions: the daring swordsmen Athos, Porthos, and Aramis. Together they strive heroically to defend the honor of their queen against the powerful Cardinal Richelieu and the seductive spy Milady.


@d’ArtsDaMAN It’s time to go off into the world and follow my secondary dream and become a Musketeer. Apparently Jedis don’t actually exist.

From Twitterature: The World's Greatest Books in Twenty Tweets or Less

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:19:24 -0400)

(see all 10 descriptions)

Alexandre Dumas's classic novel about the nobleman D'Artagnan who, along with three Musketeers, defend the honor of Anne of Austria against the plots of Cardinal Richeliu during the reign of France's King Louis XIV.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 44 descriptions

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Audible.com

Sixteen editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

Two editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140367470, 0141442344

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