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The Gilded Age by Mark Twain
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The Gilded Age (1873)

by Mark Twain, Charles Dudley Warner (Author)

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Recently added byBenBookHoarder, amyem58, renbedell, JaanaG, DanaLeeReads, GMGee, private library, Gregg_James
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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
This sat on my shelf for ages while I was convinced it was non-fiction. It turns out to be a novel, co-written by Twain and Warner. It seems they each wrote whole chapters and the ones by Twain seem to stick out for me, the acerbic wit and satire. On the whole, the satire is the best of it, the plot line gets a bit crazy and there seems to be a cast of thousands. I started reading it during my long wait for jury duty and then it languished a bit so it's hard to say if it was my interest in the story or just events. The politics and crazy land speculation had a familar ring to these days (that was what drove me to read it) Are we living in a new Gilded Age? Just perhaps. And less and less of us are even mildly gilded.
  amyem58 | Jul 15, 2014 |
A free audiobook is available from https://librivox.org/ ( )
  captbirdseye | Mar 3, 2014 |
A comic tale of land speculation and greed that is depressingly familiar. "A Novel of Today" indeed. Although this was written in the early ages of the 'Gilded Age' to which it would give its name, before the rise of the great industrial conglomerates and wars of conquest and imperialism, it does reveal the current spirit of corruption and greed.

This is Twain's only collaborative novel, and despite the possible hazards thereof, is actually pretty good. It is fairly obvious when the other guy takes over. He's not bad, and is even witty - but few compare to the great Master Twain. The scenes on the riverboat and in Congress shine, and are almost at the level of Twain's best stuff. ( )
  HadriantheBlind | Mar 30, 2013 |
First line:
~ Squire Hawkins sat upon the pyramid of large blocks, called the 'stile', contemplating the morning ~

Well, I have to say, I understand that this is not one of Mark Twain's best so I may try another later on. I found it tedious and boring at times. But I got through it. Perhaps if you read it when it was written, the social commentary would have been more significant. ( )
  ccookie | Feb 28, 2012 |
This may not be considered Twain's best, although I hope the political correctness crowd does not tamper with it as well, it is an entertaining and easy read. The subtitle seems to be the real import of the novel, a tale of today. Twain pokes fun at social mores such as the expected role of women and he knocks the inept and corrupt Congress for its short comings. As a result, the novel is just as timely today as it was for a perceptive critic of his day, Twain.
  gmicksmith | Jan 18, 2011 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Twain, Markprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Warner, Charles DudleyAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
—Seventhly, Before his Voyage, He should make his peace with God, satisfie his Creditors if he be in debt; Pray earnestly to God to prosper him in his Voyage, and to keep him from danger, and, if he be sui juris, he should make his last will, and wisely order all his affairs, since many that go far abroad, return not home. (This good and Christian Counsel is given by Martinus Zeilerus in his Apodemical Canons before his Itinerary of Spain and Portugal.)
        Leigh's Diatribe of Travel, p. 7.
Via, Pecunia! when she's run and gone
And fled, and dead, then will I fetch her again
With aqua vitӕ, out of an old hogshead!
While there are lees of wine, or dregs of beer,
I'll never want her! Coin her out of cobwebs,
Dust, but I'll have her! raise wool upon egg-shells,
Sir, and make grass grow out of marrow-bones,
To make her come!
        Ben Jonson.
—Whan þe borde is thynne, as of seruyse,
  Nought replenesshed with grete diuersite
 Of mete & drinke, good chere may then suffise
  With honest talkyng—
        The Book of Curtesye.
  Mammon. Come on, sir. Now, you set your foot on shore
In Novo Orbe; here's the rich Peru:
And there, within, sir, are the golden mines,
Great Solomon's Ophir!—
        Ben Jonson. The Alchemist.
What ever to say he toke in his entente,
his langage was so fayer & pertynante,
yt semeth vnto manys herying
not only the worde, but veryly the thyng.
        Caxton's Book of Curtesye, l. 340--343 (ed., E. E. Text Society).
—“We have view'd it,
And measur'd it within all, by the scale:
The richest tract of land, love, in the kingdom!
There will be made seventeen or eighteen millions,
Or more, as't may be handled!
        Ben Jonson. The Devil is an Ass.
Dedication
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This book was not written for private circulation among friends; it was not written to cheer and instruct a diseased relative of the author's; it was not thrown off during intervals of wearing labor to amuse an idle hour. It was not written for any of these reasons, and therefore it is submitted without the usual apologies.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014043920X, Paperback)

First published in 1873, The Gilded Age is both a biting satire and a revealing portrait of post-Civil War America-an age of corruption when crooked land speculators, ruthless bankers, and dishonest politicians voraciously took advantage of the nation's peacetime optimism. With his characteristic wit and perception, Mark Twain and his collaborator, Charles Dudley Warner, attack the greed, lust, and naivete of their own time in a work which endures as a valuable social document and one of America's most important satirical novels.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:52:37 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

First published in 1873, The Gilded Age is both a biting satire and a revealing portrait of post-Civil War America-an age of corruption when crooked land speculators, ruthless bankers, and dishonest politicians voraciously took advantage of the nation's peacetime optimism. With his characteristic wit and perception, Mark Twain and his collaborator, Charles Dudley Warner, attack the greed, lust, and naivete of their own time in a work which endures as a valuable social document and one of America's most important satirical novels.… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

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