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The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer
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The Iliad and the Odyssey

by Homer

Other authors: Robert Fagles (Translator)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 41 mentions

English (20)  German (1)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (23)
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
"When young any composition pleases which unites a little sense, some imagination, and some rhythm, in doses however small. But as we advance in life these things fall off one by one, and I suspect we are left at last with only Homer and Virgil, perhaps Homer alone." - Thomas Jefferson, Thoughts on English Prosody
  ThomasJefferson | Jul 30, 2014 |
Germany is a country without access to the Mediterranean Sea. The longing for the cradle of the Ancient World grew out of German Classicism and Romanticism, which would have been very poor without Homer’s epics.
  hbergander | Feb 11, 2014 |
Birthday gift from my Sis-in-law!
  capriciousreader | Dec 20, 2013 |
read both in HS mythology class, I enjoyed the books ( )
  mike.stephenson | May 24, 2013 |
What better way to understand 12th century Troy than Homer's epic poem the Iliad. Homer's epic poems are some of the oldest surviving works of Western Literature. They are extremely important to learning about the Western civilization. I read both of these poems in my A.P. English class and I would use these in my curriculum. Students learn about violence and the effects of war. It's important to learn about these topics because we can learn from their mistakes. ( )
  AlexaRay | Mar 18, 2013 |
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» Add other authors (90 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Homerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fagles, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Butcher, S.H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Butler, SamuelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cullen, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fagles, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Friedrich, Wolf HartmutAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knox, BernardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lang, AndrewTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lattimore, RichmondTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pope, AlexanderTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Voß, Johann HeinrichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This work contains both (and only) The Iliad and The Odyssey. It should not be combined with either work separately or with Greek versions of the same texts (due to the "dead languages" exception).
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0147712556, Paperback)


Gripping listeners and readers for more than 2,700 years, The Iliad is the story of the Trojan War and the rage of Achilles. Combining the skills of a poet and scholar, Robert Fagles brings the energy of contemporary language to this enduring heroic epic. If The Iliad is the world's greatest war story, then The Odyssey is literature's greatest evocation of every man's journey through life. Here again, Fagles has performed the translator's task magnificently, giving us an Odyssey to read aloud, to savor, and to treasure for its sheer lyrical mastery. Each volume contains a superb introduction with textual and critical commentary by renowned classicist Bernard Knox.


@RageAgainstTheAchaean Pissed. I am so, so very pissed.

First I have to go to this beach. Then I have to kill all these dudes. And NOW – now! This prick stole my biscuit. Who does that? Am I right?

Can’t resolve this problem on my own – calling Mom!

From Twitterature: The World's Greatest Books in Twenty Tweets or Less about The Iliad


@IthacaStateOfMind Uh oh. This cave is a giant’s lair. He has a taste for cheese, and my companions. He also has only one eye. Trying to keep from laughing.

Got him drunk. Put a hot poker in his ONE EYE when he blacked out. That will show him – if he could see. LOL. Time to leave.

Damn. Poseidon pissed. How was I supposed to know One-Eye was his son? What Olympian whore did he sleep with to get an issue like that?

From Twitterature: The World's Greatest Books in Twenty Tweets or Less about The Odyssey

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:59:03 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Retells these classic Greek Myths in a comic strip format characterized by irreverent humour. Suggested level: junior, primary.

» see all 4 descriptions

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