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Red Letters: Living a Faith That Bleeds by…
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Red Letters: Living a Faith That Bleeds

by Tom Davis

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832214,536 (3.36)4

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NCLA Review -If you need motivation to act on your Christian faith, then this is the book for you. Tom Davis lays out a very convincing case for responding with action to the words of Jesus, which are printed in red. Written in a conversational style with stories of children in Africa and India who are suffering incredible lives due to HIV/AIDS and poverty, Davis challenges the reader to get out of his or her comfort zone and take action. We are reminded that Jesus took care of the poor, the outcasts, the sick and calls on us to do the same. The reader is given five steps that can be taken to help the fifty million AIDS victims. This is a compelling, challenging book. Rating: 4—JD ( )
  ncla | Jun 30, 2008 |
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To the almost fifty million people living with HIV who are created in God's image, have value and purpose, and deserve to know they are loved and respected.
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Russians celebrate the arrival of spring in March.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0781445353, Paperback)

"I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not clothe me, sick and in prison and you did not visit me."
Matthew 25:42-43 ESV

In many Bibles, Christ’s words are set apart with a red font. It should be obvious, but this distinction helps remind us that when God becomes Man and that Man speaks—it’s probably something we cannot afford to miss.

So why doesn’t the church take these “ red letters” to heart? Why aren’t we doing more to be Christ’s hands and feet to the poor, the disenfranchised, the weary, the ill, the fatherless, the prisoners? It’s all there—in red letters. Why has the Church shirked its responsibilities, leaving the work to be done by governments, rock stars, and celebrities?

The Gospel wasn’t only meant to be read—it was meant to be lived. From the HIV crisis in Africa to a single abused and lonely child in Russia, the Church must seize the opportunity to serve with a radical, reckless abandon. Author Tom Davis offers both challenge and encouragement to get involved in an increasingly interconnected, desperate modern world.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:55 -0400)

Stressing the importance of the words of Jesus, which are set apart with a red font in many bibles, this book encourages Christians and the church to get involved with the down-and-out, including the poor, the ill, and the incarcerated.

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