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The Undiscovered Self by C. G. Jung
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The Undiscovered Self

by C. G. Jung

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» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
a brilliant and searching inquiry into the dilemma of the individual in today's society by one of theworld's greatest psychiatrists
  petralex | Jun 18, 2017 |
Only read half of this, not very useful overall. ( )
  Baku-X | Jan 10, 2017 |
As a behaviorist, I started this book with a bias. I had to read this for a History of Psychology class. Of all the people in the psychoanalysis club, Jung is the most digestable to me. Some of his ideas are very interesting and thought provoking if taken outside of the psychoanalytic context. ( )
  joyhclark | Jan 20, 2016 |
While reading him, I swing wildly between thinking that Jung is very sensible and good and right, and thinking that he's a dick. The trouble, I think, is that after you've been reading Freud, coming to Jung is at first refreshing. He seems to apply Freud's ideas in a way that is more relevant to everyday life, that relates more to the experience of existence that we actually have, rather than just using them to build a system. Freud tends to grab hold of a theory and run with it to its ridiculous conclusion. He gets on his little horse and rides it blinkered to the finish line. And you wonder, well, shouldn't you try using the height advantage of being on a horse to just look around for any new possibilities you can see? Jung does this - he sits on his horse and has a good look around. This is very refreshing. But after a while, you begin to miss the big ideas, you miss Freud's crazy ambition, the striving for a system that explains everything, you want to scream at Jung: you're on a horse. Are you just going to sit there on it? You might as well have brought a fucking stepladder. Then he says something about parapsychology and you throw the book at the wall. ( )
  stilton | Apr 10, 2015 |
Once I got past the first three or so chapters (discussing, of all things the Cold War?) Jung got into his beliefs about the self and how we can understand ourself and what it means to truly know yourself. That stuff I dig.

Go Jung! ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
C. G. Jungprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hull, R. F. C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To my friend Fowler McCormick
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0451217322, Mass Market Paperback)

In his classic, provocative work, Dr. Carl Jung-one of psychiatry's greatest minds-argues that the future depends on our ability to resist society's mass movements. Only by understanding our unconscious inner nature-"the undiscovered self"-can we gain the self-knowledge that is antithetical to ideological fanaticism. But this requires facing the duality of the human psyche-the existence of good and evil in us all. In this seminal book, Jung compellingly argues that only then can we cope and resist the dangers posed by those in power.

 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:08 -0400)

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Eminent psychoanalyst presents an essay on the predicament of modern man.

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