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Exit Music by Ian Rankin
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Exit Music (original 2007; edition 2010)

by Ian Rankin

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1,526424,821 (3.84)72
Member:Zelda43
Title:Exit Music
Authors:Ian Rankin
Info:Back Bay Books (2010), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 448 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
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Exit Music by Ian Rankin (2007)

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English (39)  Italian (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (42)
Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
Final book in the Rebus series. Great ending and to the series - but probably not for everyone's taste. A Russian poet is murdered and the cast of likely suspects include politicians in the Scottish Nationalist party, important bankers, and Rebus' perennial nemesis Cafferty. Plenty of twists that don't always go where you expect them - but that is of course part of the enjoyment as a reader. ( )
  stuart10er | Nov 5, 2013 |
This was the first book I've read in this series and come to find out it's probably the last! Oh well, still enjoyed very much and would definitely read the earlier books. ( )
  Dianekeenoy | Aug 14, 2013 |
I bought this some little while ago and decided to keep it to read as my reward for finishing my nonfiction book Denying Science (coming your way this fall, plug plug); of course, Denying Science proved to be one of those rare books that took me far longer to polish off than anticipated, so, as you can imagine, by the time I allowed myself to reach Exit Music down from the shelf, I was trembling like a junkie in need of a fix. But it was worth the wait . . .

This is the book that sees Rebus's exit -- his last case before retiring from the force. In a way it's a simple one -- a distinguished Russian emigree poet and notorious womanizer, now based in Edinburgh, is beaten to death in a little frequented street somewhere off the end of Princes Street. As Rebus investigates, he becomes convinced the murder must have something to do with the presence in Edinburgh of fleets of Russian industrialists who're being courted by Members of the Scottish Parliament in hopes they'll bring money and jobs to the Scottish economy. Is there some kind of coverup going on? Are those Russians really just businessmen or are they better characterized as mob bosses? And how come Ger Cafferty, Edinburgh's top gangster and Rebus's longtime nemesis, is somehow mixed up in all this?

This isn't the best Rebus novel I've read but it's not far off it, and certainly a distinguished ending to an astonishingly distinguished series; the book's climax is like something out of a Shakespeare play, at once darkly comic and a comment on the human condition. I'm lucky enough that I've never made a point of reading the Rebus books in order, so I still have several to go -- in fact, I already own two others that I've not yet read (plus a couple of Rankin's non-Rebus novels). There cannot be a crime-fiction writer in the world who does not regard Rankin's work as the benchmark against which all other writing in the field should be compared. ( )
  JohnGrant1 | Aug 11, 2013 |
The last in the Inspector Rebus series. Rebus gets involved with a murder of a Russian. He’s convinced that his old enemy, Cafferty, is involved. It’s Rebus’ last chance to get Cafferty before his retirement at the end of the week. A new officer in their team turns out to want revenge and tries to frame Rebus, but Rebus is spending more time on suspension than on the job.

Good ending. Does Cafferty live or die? The reader finds out that Rebus has a ‘soft spot’ for Cafferty after all. A good ending to a series. ( )
  dalzan | Apr 24, 2013 |
It's the end of an era. DI Rebus has retired but not before he solves one last murder. And not before he gets suspended one more time. You would think those two events would be mutually exclusive but John Rebus is not one to let a suspension get in the way of solving a crime. Which makes me wonder what awaits him in his retirement. Surely Ian Rankin is not going to give up on John Rebus entirely.

The events in this book take place in late November 2006. A young girl finds a dead body as she makes her way down a fairly deserted street in Edinburgh. It's not completely deserted because her screams bring a middle-aged couple to her side. The police are called and since Rebus and Siobhan Clarke are going over some cold cases at the station they take the call. It looks like an ordinary mugging gone bad since all the deceased's valuables are gone. Once the victim is identified as a dissident Russian poet, Todorov, Rebus wonders if it was some revenge by the Russian government. The Scottish parliament and First Albannach Bank (a thinly disguised Royal Bank of Scotland) have been wining and dining a group of Russian businessmen and one in particular, Andropov, has ties to the deceased. When a second death occurs a few days after the first and this victim is the person the poet had a last meal with, it seems too much of a coincidence. Rebus and Clarke, with the help of the other two detectives and a uniformed officer who was at the scene of the first death and impressed both John and Siobhan, start delving into the lives of both men. When Rebus is checking out the story the girl who found the body gave he discomfits the step-daughter of the head of FAB (who was the person the girl said she had been visiting). The head of the bank goes to the chief of police and Rebus gets suspended. With only a few days to go until his official retirement Rebus digs into the case even though he is banned from the police station. Since he hardly seems to need any sleep he also stakes out his arch nemesis, Big Ger Cafferty, and finds out that another police division is also watching Cafferty. Rebus does discover that Cafferty and Andropov are meeting and appear to be doing business together. Does this mean that Cafferty is involved in the two murders? There is nothing Rebus would like better than to end his career by putting Cafferty behind bars. When Cafferty is found badly beaten Rebus is the prime suspect. With the clock ticking down on his career it looks like Rebus might be spending time in a police station but on the other side of the bars.

The ending is as much of a surprise as all the other Rebus books that I have read. I won't spoil the surprise for others but I will say that it leaves scope for further adventures of John Rebus. So I won't say farewell, just take care and see you soon I hope. ( )
  gypsysmom | Jan 7, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
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"The frontier is never
somewhere else. And no stockades
can keep the midnight out"
Norman McCaig, 'Hotel Room, 12th floor'
My father always said a policeman's knock is unmistakable, and so it is, the rap on the paintwork a very public command, feasting on the hearer's capacity for guilt.
Andrew O'Hagan, Be Near Me
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The girl screamed once, only the once, but it was enough.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0316057584, Hardcover)

It's late in the fall in Edinburgh and late in the career of Detective Inspector John Rebus. As he is simply trying to tie up some loose ends before his retirement, a new case lands on his desk: a dissident Russian poet has been murdered in what looks like a mugging gone wrong.
Rebus discovers that an elite delegation of Russian businessmen is in town, looking to expand its interests. And as Rebus's investigation gains ground, someone brutally assaults a local gangster with whom he has a long history.
Has Rebus overstepped his bounds for the last time? Only a few days shy of the end to his long, controversial career, will Rebus even make it that far?

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:56:11 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

It's late in the fall in Edinburgh and late in the career of Detective Inspector John Rebus. As he is simply trying to tie up some loose ends before his retirement, a new case lands on his desk: a dissident Russian poet has been murdered in what looks like a mugging gone wrong. Rebus discovers that an elite delegation of Russian businessmen is in town, looking to expand its interests. And as Rebus's investigation gains ground, someone brutally assaults a local gangster with whom he has a long history. Has Rebus overstepped his bounds for the last time? Only a few days shy of the end to his long, controversial career, will Rebus even make it that far?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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