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Utente sconosciuto by Connelly Michael
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Utente sconosciuto (2002)

by Connelly Michael, Lonza Gianna (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,188312,964 (3.53)14
Member:saintwo2005
Title:Utente sconosciuto
Authors:Connelly Michael
Other authors:Lonza Gianna (Translator)
Info:Piemme
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:2000, gialli

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Chasing the Dime by Michael Connelly (2002)

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» See also 14 mentions

English (29)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (31)
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
A good read....I enjoyed the audio as always. Henry Pierce has a whole new life — new apartment, new telephone, new telephone number. But the first time he checks his messages, he discovers that someone had the number before him. The messages on his line are for a woman named Lilly, and she is in some kind of serious trouble. Pierce is inexorably drawn into Lilly’s world, and it’s unlike any world he’s ever known. It is a nighttime world of escort services, websites, sex, and secret identities. Pierce tumbles through a hole, abandoning his orderly life in a frantic race to save the life of a woman he has never met.

Pierce’s skills as a computer entrepreneur allow him to trace Lilly’s last days with some precision. But every step into Lilly’s past takes Pierce deeper into a web of inescapable intricacy — and a decision that could cost him everything he owns and holds dear. ( )
  JudithDCollins | Nov 27, 2014 |
Good enough to keep me up all night until I finished it. Has some definite "red herrings" to keep you guessing who the real killer was but still was able to figure it out before the reveal. Learned a little about the biochemical-technological industry, too. ( )
  SusanBNM | Nov 23, 2014 |
Michael Connelly’s books are always good. This one does not feature his staple detective, Harry Bosch, although the main character did have peripheral involvement with a case from a previous novel relating to serial killings by the “doll maker” (see [book:The Concrete Blonde].)

Henry Pierce has had a brilliant idea that may soon translate into an enormous fortune. A chemist, he has discovered a method to create a new power source for nano-computers, His firm, Amedeo Technologies, has the backing of a venture capitalist, and all that is needed is a lock on the patents that will secure them the rights to his inventive process. After breaking up with Nicole, the intelligence officer of his company, he moves into a new apartment only to discover that his new phone number is the same as that of a call girl’s website. Apparently, her phone had been disconnected and her number reassigned to Henry’s new phone. Henry tries to contact the woman only to discover that she seems to have disappeared. Troubled by the killing of his sister many years before — a detail that does not initially explain his obsession with the case, but read on — he plays detective and learns troubling information about the girl’s disappearance. She had been a big star of a porn magnate. Despite warnings from a colleague of hers and from a private detective who had been hired by the girl’s mother, Henry pushes on, only to be beaten up by the goons working for an unknown person. Pierce becomes more and more enmeshed in the case, and, as evidence pointing to his own culpability surfaces, the police start to wonder if he himself is not responsible for the girl’s death. Then it gets even better as Henry engages his rational scientific skills and puts some of the pieces together. Wondering if the police had really searched his car, he traces his steps back and realizes that, perhaps, instead something had been placed in it. He discovers a strange key in his backpack. Tracking down its origin, he learns the key fits a lock in a storage room that he was unaware of, but that had been rented under his name. He discovers the missing girl’s body in a freezer in the storage room. Henry decides to head off the setup he feels sure is enveloping him and realizes that everything points to someone in the company who wants Proteus, his discovery that would revolutionize nano-technology. Don’t be put off by Henry’s seemingly stupid moves in the beginning.

Connelly is too good a writer to leave things unexplained, and everything is satisfactorily resolved. ( )
  ecw0647 | Sep 30, 2013 |
This was OK but I was slightly disappointed. It seemed too far fetched. I usually like Michael Connelly novels a lot but this one didn't quite work. It was interesting to read about DNA computing though and I did look it up afterwards. ( )
  infjsarah | Sep 18, 2013 |
Amazon.com Review Henry Pierce is about to become very rich--as soon as his firm, Amedeo Technologies, gets an infusion of capital from a big backer. But the brilliant chemist's workaholic habits are disrupted when his lover, the former intelligence officer of his company, breaks up with him. Lonely and dispirited, he moves into a new apartment and gets a new phone number that attracts a lot of callers, but not for him. His new telephone number seems to have previously belonged to one Lilly Quinlan, an escort whose Internet photo arouses Henry's curiosity, especially when L.A. Darlings, whose Web page features the beautiful young woman, can't tell Henry how to find her. With the same single-mindedness that made him a high-tech superstar, Pierce pursues his search for the missing girl, motivated by his guilt over the disappearance years earlier of his own sister, who, like Lilly, was also a prostitute (and ultimately the victim of the Dollmaker, a serial killer from Connelly's 1994 novel The Concrete Blonde.) But that motive is too thin to support Pierce's sudden abandonment of his career at such a critical juncture, even if forces unknown to him are setting him up for a fall. Despite those holes in the plot and a less than compelling protagonist, the novel succeeds due to Connelly's literary and expository gifts and his more interesting secondary characters. --Jane Adams From Wikipedia Chasing the Dime is a novel by American crime-writer Michael Connelly. Read more - Shopping-Enabled Wikipedia on Amazon In the article: Plot summary
  Hans.Michel | Sep 13, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
It doesn't have the urgency of his best work, but it also avoids his tendency to work in one plot twist too many until the plausibility of his story falls to bits... Still, "Chasing the Dime" is well-plotted and it holds your interest, and it's easy to picture the book's high-tech shenanigans translating well to the screen.
added by Shortride | editSalon, Charles Taylor (Nov 14, 2002)
 

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Michael Connellyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lonza, GiannaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This is for Holly Wilkinson
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The voice on the phone was a whisper.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 044661162X, Mass Market Paperback)

Henry Pierce is about to become very rich--as soon as his firm, Amedeo Technologies, gets an infusion of capital from a big backer. But the brilliant chemist's workaholic habits are disrupted when his lover, the former intelligence officer of his company, breaks up with him. Lonely and dispirited, he moves into a new apartment and gets a new phone number that attracts a lot of callers, but not for him. His new telephone number seems to have previously belonged to one Lilly Quinlan, an escort whose Internet photo arouses Henry's curiosity, especially when L.A. Darlings, whose Web page features the beautiful young woman, can't tell Henry how to find her. With the same single-mindedness that made him a high-tech superstar, Pierce pursues his search for the missing girl, motivated by his guilt over the disappearance years earlier of his own sister, who, like Lilly, was also a prostitute (and ultimately the victim of the Dollmaker, a serial killer from Connelly's 1994 novel The Concrete Blonde.) But that motive is too thin to support Pierce's sudden abandonment of his career at such a critical juncture, even if forces unknown to him are setting him up for a fall. Despite those holes in the plot and a less than compelling protagonist, the novel succeeds due to Connelly's literary and expository gifts and his more interesting secondary characters. --Jane Adams

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:02:49 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

After accidentally intercepting some telephone messages for the previous tenant of his new apartment, computer entrepreneur Henry Price is drawn into a nightmarish web of dark and dangerous secrets as he races against time to save the life of a woman he has never met.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 16 descriptions

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