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Dot by Peter H. Reynolds
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Dot (original 2003; edition 2004)

by Peter H. Reynolds

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1,7242404,107 (4.51)11
Member:thuvan0301
Title:Dot
Authors:Peter H. Reynolds
Info:Walker Childrens Paperbacks (2004), Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:easy, teacher, creativity, encouragement, gr. k-3

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The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds (2003)

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Showing 1-5 of 239 (next | show all)
Summary: Vashti doesn't believe that she can draw and is left sitting with a blank piece of paper at the end of art class. Vashti's teacher encourages her to keep trying, even by simply making a mark on her paper. Still convinced she is unable to draw anything, Vashti jabs the paper with her marker and creates a dot. Her teacher makes her sign her name at the bottom of her masterpiece, and what lies ahead is unlike anything Vashti could have anticipated.

Use: I would use this book to encourage my students to believe in their abilities to create art and to in turn encourage others, just like Vashti does with her classmate at the end of the book. ( )
  Lucymae | Mar 24, 2017 |
Review: Dot is a contemporary fiction book about a little girl named Vashti who was upset with her drawing abilities. Her teacher encouraged her to make a mark on her paper and sign her name. The next week when Vashti came into art class her teacher had framed her dot and hung it over her desk. A little boy walked up to her at her art show and told her what a great artist she was and that he was not a very good artist. Vashti told the boy to draw a line on the paper, she examined the line and told him to sign it.

Personal: This book is a great way for the children to build self-esteem if they do not feel very good about their drawings.

Classroom: Have the children paint a picture with only using dots. It can be anything that they can paint or color by using dots only!
  courtneynorton | Mar 24, 2017 |
Summary: Is a contemporary fiction book about a little girl named Vashti who was upset with her drawing abilities. Her teacher encouraged her to make a mark on her paper and sign her name. The next week when Vashti came into art class her teacher had framed her dot and hung it over her desk. Vashti said “I can make a better dot than that” and opened her paints and started making various dots of all different shapes colors and sizes. A little boy walked up to her at her art show and told her what a great artist she was and that he was not a very good artist. Vashti told the boy to draw a line on the paper, she examined the line and told him to sign it.
Personal Review: I think this book is a very cute book that helps children build self-esteem. I think children can gain a lot from this book not only with art but with applying themselves at the task at hand. I think the illustrations’ in this book are very inviting and follow great with the story.
Classroom Extensions: Have the students create their own original dot artwork and hold and art show for the students. Invite the parents to come and listen to the story and then look at all the student’s creations. Another classroom activity would be for the students to paint and age appropriate object only with dots for example a vase with marbles in it. ( )
  ekelley05 | Mar 20, 2017 |
Art class is over, but Vashti is sitting glued to her chair in front of a blank piece of paper. The words of her teacher are a gentle invitation to express herself. But Vashti can’t draw - she’s no artist. To prove her point, Vashti jabs at a blank sheet of paper to make an unremarkable and angry mark. "There!" she says. That one little dot marks the beginning of Vashti’s journey of surprise and self-discovery. That special moment is the core of Peter H. Reynolds’s delicate fable about the creative spirit in all of us.
  wichitafriendsschool | Feb 25, 2017 |
Review:
I liked this book for 2 reasons. The book teaches kids how to gain perspective. This was exampled by Vashti, the heroine, when she made a dot on a page at the request of her art teacher. Vashti didn't think much of her art. This book also teaches that anybody making any art is good art. This was exampled by Vashti, when she finished an art showing and young child said they wish they could be a good artist like her. She had the child do the same thing that her art teacher did for her. ( )
  mmoria4 | Feb 22, 2017 |
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Epigraph
Dedication
Dedicated to Mr. Matson, my 7th grade math teacher, who dared me to "make my mark."
First words
Art class was over, but Vashti sat glued to her chair.
Quotations
"Hmmph! I can make a better dot than THAT!
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0763619612, Hardcover)

A frustrated grade school artist, Vashti sits slumped over her blank piece of paper at the end of art class. "I just CAN'T draw!" she tells her teacher. Her teacher first uses wit, then subtle yet clever encouragement to inspire her student to go beyond her insecurities and become, in the words of a younger boy who "can’t" draw either, "a really great artist."

Peter H. Reynolds crafts a quiet, pleasing story in The Dot--one that will strike a chord with children who have outgrown the self-assurance of kindergarten and begun to doubt their own greatness. His marvelous watercolor, ink, and, yes, tea illustrations are appealing in a Quentin Blakey way, especially as Vashti begins to go wild with her dots. The delightfully open-ended conclusion will have readers of all ages contemplating how they can make their own mark in the world. Highly recommended. (Ages 5 to 9) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:36 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Vashti believes that she cannot draw, but her art teacher's encouragement leads her to change her mind.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

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Candlewick Press

An edition of this book was published by Candlewick Press.

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