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The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search…
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The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the… (original 2008; edition 2009)

by Eric Weiner

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1,755844,022 (3.79)109
Member:Sovranty
Title:The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World
Authors:Eric Weiner
Info:Twelve (2009), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 368 pages
Collections:Your library, Book Club, Read but unowned
Rating:**1/2
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The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World by Eric Weiner (2008)

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Thanks GR groups for reminding me about this. I don't remember much, but I do remember it was interesting.

ETA - ironically, I do remember even now some general principles that Bliss discusses that I wish more people understood and implied. Some of the ideas keep coming up in many of the psych books I've been reading since. For example, 'the paradox of choice' principle - we get frustrated if there's more stuff out there than we can use, because of the feeling that we must be missing out on something even better. I should maybe reread this now that I have read so many other related science and popular science books. ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
This was a pretty great book. The humor part of Weiner's narrative was charming in the beginning but began to get old towards the end. However, I really enjoyed learning about the different cultures. The culture of Iceland is so appealing! But it wasn't just the culture, it was the different levels of happiness in each culture that was fascinating. In some cultures/countries people were very happy, in others they weren't at all. The book tries to analyze why there's these differences which make a bunch of sense when you take the time to think about it. This is a thought provoking book and a great read if you're interesting in the concept of happiness. ( )
  Kassilem | May 30, 2016 |
This work of non-fiction is part travelogue and part social science research. The mix of the two makes for an entertaining and enlightening book. The author starts out exploring the concept of happiness and ends up visiting ten of the happiest places on earth and one of the unhappiest in order to find out what makes a place, and consequently, the people who live there, happy. I am not sure he found out what made them happy, as there didn't seem to be a common thread, but he did find out what made them unhappy. In a word, that was, money. While the author found out that it is true that money can't buy happiness, he also discovered that the lack of money can make people unhappy. The only exception was the country of Bhutan. In that country money, more, or not enough, doesn't seem to make much difference in the way people feel and think about their lives. All-in-all, this was a fascinating look at the concept of happiness and all the components of a place that make it a happy place to be and live. ( )
  benitastrnad | Mar 21, 2016 |
What makes the happiest places on earth different than other places? You'll never know from reading this book. It's such a fascinating subject too, but Weiner just skates across the surface noticing irrelevant points and skipping stuff than might actually explain the differences. He never gives any criteria for how he includes a country (suicide rate? divorce rate? Number of its citizens in therapy?)except it's in some hand-cobbled "Atlas of Happiness" he put together from a professor's database at a school in Rotterdam. He doesn't really try to understand a culture - he just makes humorous observations and slides on to the next country. Ultimately, his definition of the happiest country seems to bea place that where he, Eric Weiner, would be happy. Forget you. I didn't have the time. Maybe I should write my own book, it's a fascinating subject. ( )
  ChrisNewton | Mar 18, 2016 |
Expected this to be mildly interesting but it was fascinating and highly entertaining to boot. Like a good travelogue with intriguing social science research built in. ( )
  BraveNewBks | Mar 10, 2016 |
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for Sharon
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My bags were packed and my provisions loaded.
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In these days of wars and rumors of wars, haven't you ever dreamed of a place where there was peace and security, where living was not a struggle but a lasting delight? - Lost Horizon, directed by Frank Capra, 1937
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0446580260, Hardcover)

Part foreign affairs discourse, part humor, and part twisted self-help guide, The Geography of Bliss takes the reader from America to Iceland to India in search of happiness, or, in the crabby author's case, moments of "un-unhappiness." The book uses a beguiling mixture of travel, psychology, science and humor to investigate not what happiness is, but where it is. Are people in Switzerland happier because it is the most democratic country in the world? Do citizens of Qatar, awash in petrodollars, find joy in all that cash? Is the King of Bhutan a visionary for his initiative to calculate Gross National Happiness? Why is Asheville, North Carolina so damn happy? With engaging wit and surprising insights, Eric Weiner answers those questions and many others, offering travelers of all moods some interesting new ideas for sunnier destinations and dispositions.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:57:51 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Part foreign affairs discourse, part humor, and part twisted self-help guide, this book takes the reader from America to Iceland to India in search of happiness, or, in the crabby author's case, moments of "un-unhappiness." The book uses a mixture of travel, psychology, science and humor to investigate not what happiness is, but where it is. Are people in Switzerland happier because it is the most democratic country in the world? Do citizens of Singapore benefit psychologically by having their options limited by the government? Is the King of Bhutan a visionary for his initiative to calculate Gross National Happiness? Why is Asheville, North Carolina, so darn happy? NPR correspondent Weiner answers those questions and many others, offering travelers of all moods some interesting new ideas for sunnier destinations and dispositions.--From publisher description.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

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