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Whose Body? (Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries) by…
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Whose Body? (Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries) (edition 1995)

by Dorothy L. Sayers

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2,800892,085 (3.71)274
Member:mirrordrum
Title:Whose Body? (Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries)
Authors:Dorothy L. Sayers
Info:HarperTorch (1995), Mass Market Paperback, 224 pages
Collections:Your library
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Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers (Author)

  1. 30
    The Inimitable Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse (casvelyn)
    casvelyn: Lord Peter Wimsey and Bertie Wooster are rather similar characters, and they both have loyal and competent valets. Peter, of course, solves mysteries, while Bertie is more of a comic figure.
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» See also 274 mentions

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I really expected to like this book better. I found it a bit dull and the character of Lord Peter Wimsey to be somewhat difficult to like. Not that impressed. ( )
  AliceAnna | Oct 24, 2014 |
I irritate myself occasionally. Although I've tried a few times to read Golden Age mysteries, they just don't seem to be for me. However, time will pass and once again I'll begin to feel that I'm missing out on something. This is why I picked up Dorothy L. Sayers' very first Lord Peter Wimsey mystery, Whose Body? I've always had the feeling that-- if I liked any Golden Age mystery writer-- I would like her.

After reading the first few chapters of this book, I almost gave up in disgust. The pages were filled with dialogue that was supposed to be sparkling and witty but only sounded like dated, superficial piffle. (See? I may not have read Sayers before, but I've evidently been able to mine a nugget or two from various sources.)

Fortunately the book settled down and steered clear of conversational piffle throughout the rest of the story, and I actually enjoyed watching Wimsey figure out identities, timelines, and what actually happened. In fact I enjoyed it enough to start looking for the second book in the series. All you Golden Age mystery lovers-- there may be hope for me yet! ( )
  cathyskye | Aug 16, 2014 |
Pretty good, but somehow not emotionally engaging. I've liked other Sayers' Lord Peter books better. ( )
  afinch11 | Aug 2, 2014 |
The stark naked body was lying in the tub. Not unusual for a proper bath, but highly irregular for murder -- especially with a pair of gold pince-nez deliberately perched before the sightless eyes. What's more, the face appeared to have been shaved after death. The police assumed that the victim was a prominent financier, but Lord Peter Wimsey, who dabbled in mystery detection as a hobby, knew better. In this, his first murder case, Lord Peter untangles the ghastly mystery of the corpse in the bath

Considering this is the first in the series, Wimsey (plus Bunter, plus the Duchess) are strong characters already, with Wimsey being presented with a dead body in a bathroom, whilst the police are investigating the disappearance of Sir Reuben Levy, a financier who disappeared whilst on a night out.

It's fairly evident the significance of the unidentified body, but it's just a case of proving it. The written confession unfortunately, comes late in the book, and is all but redundant, as the reader should have worked it all out for themselves by the time it comes out (and it's all done bar the shouting).




( )
  nordie | May 24, 2014 |
Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers; (3*)

Having just recently found my way into this genre, I must say that I enjoyed this book. From the very beginning we are captivated by Sayers' writing and her character sketches. She only gets better from here. The interaction and the relationships of her characters make the story come alive.
We start off with two mysteries at once. A naked man, oh wait...he is wearing sunglasses, is found in someone else's bathtub. Across town another person goes missing. The local policeman has figured out the relationship,; or has he? He has even nabbed the suspects. Lord Peter, our amateur sleuth and friend of Inspector Parker must figure out if one plus one ewuals one or two.
Hmmmm...........
A very enjoyable read. ( )
3 vote rainpebble | Apr 16, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (21 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sayers, Dorothy L.Authorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bayer, OttoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bleck, CathieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Case, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
George, ElizabethIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Griffini, Grazia MariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kendall, RoeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
May, NadiaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michal,MarieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rikman, KristiinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To M. J. Dear Jim: This book is your fault. If it had not been for your brutal insistence, Lord Peter would never have staggered through to the end of the enquiry. Pray consider that he thanks you with his accustomed suavity. Yours ever, D. L. S.
First words
'Oh damn!' said Lord Peter Wimsey at Piccadilly Circus.
Quotations
"Look here, Peter," said the other [Parker] with some earnestness, "Suppose you get this playing-fields-of-Eton complex out of your system once and for all. There doesn't seem to be much doubt that something unpleasant has happened to Sir Reuben Levy. Call it murder, to strengthen the argument. If Sir Reuben has been murdered, is it a game? and is it fair to treat it as a game?"
"That is what I'm ashamed of, really," said Lord Peter. "It IS a game to me, to begin with, and I go on cheerfully, and then I suddenly see that somebody is going to be hurt, and I want to get out of it." (Chapter VII, Leipzig: The Albatross 1938, p. 176)
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Book description
Lord Peter's erster Fall: Der biedere Mr. Thipps, dem man sicher kein Unrecht tut, wenn man ihn einen Spießer nennt, überrascht eines unschönen Morgens in seiner Badewanne einen sehr toten und sehr unbekleideten Mann. Mr. Thipps beteuert, mit der Sache nicht das geringste zu tun zu haben. Doch hat man nicht schon oft in stillen Wassern Abgründiges entdeckt.

Cover description (1938): This is a Lord Peter Wimsey story. Need we say more? For Lord Peter Wimsey is one of the most attractive detectives of fiction. Nor is it necessary to say (since Dorothy L. Sayers is the author) that while you will enjoy this book as a detective story, you will enjoy it equally for its delightful touches of humour, its clever characterization and attractive style.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061043575, Mass Market Paperback)

The stark naked body was lying in the tub.Not unusual for a proper bath, but highly irregular for murder -- especially witha pair of gold pince-nez deliberately perched before the sightless eyes. What's more, the face appeared to have been shaved after death. The police assumed that the victim was a prominent financier, but Lord Peter Wimsey, who dabbled in mystery detection as a hobby, knew better. In this, his first murder case, Lord Peter untangles the ghastly mystery of the corpse in the bath.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:46:04 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Lord Peter Wimsey encounters his first murder case when the body of a prominent financier is discovered in a bathtub, and Wimsey finds clues in the body's post-murder facial shave and a pair of gold pince-nez.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 14 descriptions

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