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Dark Ages America: The Final Phase of Empire…
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Dark Ages America: The Final Phase of Empire (edition 2006)

by Morris Berman

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223575,140 (4.12)6
Member:occupymuskegon
Title:Dark Ages America: The Final Phase of Empire
Authors:Morris Berman
Info:W. W. Norton & Company (2006), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 400 pages
Collections:Returned to Library
Rating:
Tags:NON-CIRCULATING, from Hackley Public Library

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Dark Ages America: The Final Phase of Empire by Morris Berman

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A sad look at the way that America has backed itself into a corner in social and foreign policy.
  ritaer | Jul 21, 2016 |
pretty chilling, certainly well written and worth your time. ( )
  romanccm | Jun 25, 2014 |
Berman's depressing indictment of contemporary American culture and empire may be somewhat overstated but is nonetheless largely valid. Note how, since this book was written, Obama has had to bow to the wishes of the military and the "defense" industry. Until I read this book, I was unaware of the argument that it was the floating of international currency exchange rates in 1971 (the abandonment of the Brettin Woods system) that has done so much to cause greater inequality between rich and poor, and I was unaware that Keynes had anticipated such results if exchange rates were floated.
Berman is very good at succinctly explaining the basic reasons for the cultural clash between the Islamic world and the West, and especially America. Highly recommended! ( )
  Illiniguy71 | Sep 30, 2010 |
Notes
Depressing indictment of America's current society. Well-written and compelling, although obviously exaggerated and at times the facts seemed a bit strained.

His basic contention is that the US is going to hell in a handbasket, the American people are oblivious to it, and there is no hope. China will probably win, but it will be the hollow victory of a recast Americanism, at least as shallow and meaningless as the US.

He prefers a European work life balance, but suspects that this is only possible through reliance upon an imported class of guest workers who are functionally slaves (hard to disagree with).
1 vote jaygheiser | Jul 25, 2008 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393329771, Paperback)

"Provocative...stimulating and insightful."—Publishers Weekly

In Dark Ages America, the pundit Morris Berman argues that the nation has entered a dangerous phase in its historical development from which there is no return. As the corporate-consumerist juggernaut that now defines the nation rolls on, the very factors that once propelled America to greatness—extreme individualism, territorial and economic expansion, and the pursuit of material wealth—are, paradoxically, the nails in our collective coffin. Within a few decades, Berman argues, the United States will be marginalized on the world stage, its hegemony replaced by China or the European Union. With the United States just one terrorist attack away from a police state, Berman's book is a controversial and illuminating look at our current society and its ills.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:51 -0400)

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"Historians now recognize that the fall of Rome, and the subsequent onset of the Dark Ages in Europe, cannot be ascribed to any single cause. The truth is that Rome no longer knew how to live; its decline was the result of a general malaise and structural weakness that grew over time. In Dark Ages America, Morris Berman argues that much the same can be said of the United States today. As religion triumphs over reason and democracy turns into plutocracy, the nation has entered a phase in its historical development from which there is no return." "A particular strength of this book lies in the connections Berman makes between the large-scale processes of national collapse, such as an overextended economy and a self-destructive foreign policy, and the obvious deterioration of our daily lives: the frenzied acceleration of work, the erosion of integrity and community, and the impoverishment of the mass media. As the corporate-consumerist juggernaut that now defines the nation rolls on, removing meaning from our lives and leaving no real alternatives in its wake, the very factors that once propelled America to greatness - extreme individualism, territorial and economic expansion, and the pursuit of material wealth - are now, paradoxically, the nails in our collective coffin. Like the citizens of ancient Rome, we too no longer know how to live; and within a few decades the United States will be marginalized on the world stage, its hegemony replaced by China or the European Union." "Our options at this point, Berman suggests, are two: to continue pursuing policies that are short-sighted and destructive, thereby guaranteeing a fairly rapid decline; or to attempt some slight modifications of these policies, thereby rendering that decline a bit more gradual. What is not an option is reversing this trajectory, for the levers of social and political change have effectively vanished from the scene. There is, in short, no rabbit to be pulled out of a hat here; our eclipse is a fait accompli."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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W.W. Norton

2 editions of this book were published by W.W. Norton.

Editions: 0393058662, 0393329771

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