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Freedom on the Menu: The Greensboro Sit-Ins…
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Freedom on the Menu: The Greensboro Sit-Ins

by Carole Boston Weatherford

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Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
Taking place in the 1960s during the beginning of the Civil Rights movement, a young eight-year-old girl, Connie, begins to question why she can't do certain things and notices the signs on everything from water fountains to bathrooms; "All over town, signs told Mama and me where we could and couldn't go.". Her dad said, "Dr. King's coming to town.". After Dr. King's speech the sit-ins and protesting began which led to Connie being able to sit at the counter in a restaurant and enjoy a banana split at the end. This book is great for lessons on the Civil Rights movement, and a lesson on what the African-American community faced at this time. Student will be able to learn lessons from this book, and it is a very enjoyable book to read. I do recommend it for grades 3-5. ( )
  NChiek | Sep 22, 2018 |
A girl named Connie, who is 8, watches activist and protesters as they fight for equality in a restaurant. They wish to be served the same way as the whites are served. The girl is innocent like a child should be and wonders why the rules are different. She simply wants to eat a banana split at the bar stools, but society says no until one day the server allows the African Americans to have the same treatment. Although fictional, this books background informs of the Greensboro sit-ins. This can influence children and young adults to stand up for what they believe in and to question authority and society sometimes. ( )
  mprochnow | Sep 6, 2018 |
There were signs all throughout town telling eight-year-old Connie where she could and could not go. But when Connie sees four young men take a stand for equal rights at a Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, she realizes that things may soon change. This event sparks a movement throughout her town and region. And while Connie is too young to march or give a speech, she helps her brother and sister make signs for the cause. Changes are coming to Connie’s town, but Connie just wants to sit at the lunch counter and eat a banana split like everyone else.
  wichitafriendsschool | Jul 29, 2018 |
The really interesting part of this book is the perspective of activism from a child who cannot quite grasp what the implications of the situation are but who is still observing and drawing conclusions and making statements on his or her feelings about the situation. This girl's family does a good job explaining yet not over explaining to her about the decisions her siblings are making to protest and to join the NAACP, allowing her to view and process the situation herself. I find it very interesting that many of the illustrations for books that give reference to the civil rights movement or really african american history in general have very similar style paintings. I did just realize that Lagarrigue illustrated another book that I read for this weeks reviews so perhaps I am over generalizing but I would still say many are similar. There is a specific african american painters touch that draws upon their culture stand point and it is nice that authors respect that tradition. ( )
  signecbaum | Feb 18, 2018 |
I absolutely adored reading this book because it was very inspiring and interesting to read. The book's setting definitely made me attain an understanding that it's time was in the 60s because of the characters' clothing and the places shown in the pictures. The first hint was that the book gave me was the first picture. In the picture there was a white woman eating ice cream and staring angrily at a black woman and her daughter. This gave me the sense that there was definitely racism going on at this time period. As i kept reading the book showed a picture of the same little girl drinking out of a water fountain and a white man staring at her angrily.The mother of the girl's dresses reminded me of vintage dresses 60's style dresses that are coming back today.Therefore I figured the time period was around the 60's. I also figured that this book was about gaining civil rights because of the setting it had. ( )
  kristeen1995 | Feb 15, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0142408948, Paperback)

There were signs all throughout town telling eight-year-old Connie where she could and could not go. But when Connie sees four young men take a stand for equal rights at a Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, she realizes that things may soon change. This event sparks a movement throughout her town and region. And while Connie is too young to march or give a speech, she helps her brother and sister make signs for the cause. Changes are coming to Connie’s town, but Connie just wants to sit at the lunch counter and eat a banana split like everyone else.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:01 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The 1960 civil rights sit-ins at the Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, are seen through the eyes of a young Southern black girl.

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