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Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson
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Show Way (edition 2005)

by Jacqueline Woodson, Hudson Talbott (Illustrator)

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4405923,849 (4.33)7
Member:rachelonishi
Title:Show Way
Authors:Jacqueline Woodson
Other authors:Hudson Talbott (Illustrator)
Info:Putnam Juvenile (2005), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 48 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:African American History

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Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson

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Showing 1-5 of 57 (next | show all)
Jacqueline Woodson paints the tale of how quilting "show ways" has been passed down through generations of black women, ever since the slave trade began in the United States. A "show way" is essentially a coded map that tells how to get to the underground railroad and escape to the north. Show Way is the story to use to introduce the concept of the Underground Railroad to young children and paint an important picture of why this was vital to American history. ( )
  ksager | Oct 28, 2014 |
Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson is a picture book autobiography in which Woodson tracks her family history and her talent for story telling and art back to an unnamed female relative who was a slave.

First through learning the stars and then through the art of quilting and story telling, the women pass down the route to freedom. Even after the Civil War and emancipation, World Wars, the Depression, and Civil Rights, Woodson's family continues to pass along the Show Way quilts and the accompanying stories.

The book flows through Soonie, of one Jacqueline Woodson's ancestors and it goes through Woodson's own daughter. As a woman who remembers fondly the stories my grandmother told me of the women in the family who came before us, I felt a kinship with this story. I am eager to share it with my daughter. The copy I read was one I was cataloging at work. ( )
  pussreboots | Oct 23, 2014 |
The book as real and based on a true story. It included real events in history. It would prolly be read during black history month. I would be good for women and girls to read. ( )
  jforrest21 | Sep 22, 2014 |
This is one woman's story of tracing of her ancestors in a simple, yet poetic way. It traces important times in history in relation to her family. It also celebrates the importance of quilting and how this skill was passed down in her family. You can feel the pride and love she feels for her family in the text. The story ends with the author relating her family history to her child so that the story can continue. You could use this book when talking about family history or as a companion book to other historical books on the Underground Railroad or during that time in history. ( )
  SuPendleton | Jun 7, 2014 |
I really enjoyed reading this book. The first thing I liked was the symbolize. Throughout the story it shows how sewing muslin and quilting was passed through generations.This symbolized family ties and Woodson's family history. I also enjoyed how the illustrations were bold and colorful. Each page incorporated the color of the quilted patchwork throughout history. They were lively with intricate patterns. It was very informative to learn about Woodson's family history in this narrative and how each generation influenced the other. The main idea of this message is the importance of family history. ( )
  mingra2 | Apr 8, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jacqueline Woodsonprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hudson TalbottIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Diahann CarrollNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0399237496, Hardcover)

Soonie's great-grandma was just seven years old when she was sold to a big plantation without her ma and pa, and with only some fabric and needles to call her own. She pieced together bright patches with names like North Star and Crossroads, patches with secret meanings made into quilts called Show Ways -- maps for slaves to follow to freedom. When she grew up and had a little girl, she passed on this knowledge. And generations later, Soonie -- who was born free -- taught her own daughter how to sew beautiful quilts to be sold at market and how to read.

From slavery to freedom, through segregation, freedom marches and the fight for literacy, the tradition they called Show Way has been passed down by the women in Jacqueline Woodson's family as a way to remember the past and celebrate the possibilities of the future. Beautifully rendered in Hudson Talbott's luminous art, this moving, lyrical account pays tribute to women whose strength and knowledge illuminate their daughters' lives.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:36:46 -0400)

The making of "Show ways," or quilts which once served as secret maps for freedom-seeking slaves, is a tradition passed from mother to daughter in the author's family.

(summary from another edition)

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