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Dune by Frank Herbert
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Dune (1965)

by Frank Herbert

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Dune (1), Dune: complete chronology (8)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
25,57938044 (4.3)3 / 716
  1. 319
    Foundation by Isaac Asimov (Patangel, JonTheTerrible, philAbrams)
    JonTheTerrible: The pace of these books are similar as well as the topics they cover: society and government. The science plays only a small role in both books but is present enough to successfully build the worlds in which the characters inhabit.
  2. 123
    Hyperion by Dan Simmons (corporate_clone)
    corporate_clone: It is difficult not to compare Dune and Hyperion, even though both series have major differences in terms of tone, style and philosophy. Those are two long, epic, elaborate and very ambitious sci-fi masterpieces where religion plays a key role. I would highly recommend the fans of one to check out the other.… (more)
  3. 60
    The Faded Sun Trilogy by C. J. Cherryh (reading_fox)
    reading_fox: Same basic sort of premise - SciFi set on desert worlds inspires the rise of a galactic empire, but very different outcomes!
  4. 72
    Gateway by Frederik Pohl (Vonini)
  5. 85
    Lord Valentine's Castle by Robert Silverberg (corporate_clone)
    corporate_clone: Both books are a subtle blend of science fiction and fantasy while being truly epic stories. Although Dune remains a superior literary achievement in my view, Silverberg's Majipoor series is a credible alternative.
  6. 41
    Grass by Sheri S. Tepper (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the description of the planet.
  7. 30
    A Door Into Ocean by Joan Slonczewski (Anonymous user)
  8. 31
    The Word for World Is Forest by Ursula K. Le Guin (andomck)
    andomck: Ecological science fiction.
  9. 20
    Bright of the Sky by Kay Kenyon (amysisson)
    amysisson: Different in tone, but similar in scope, plus it's also about the lengths to which empires will go to maintain the status quo.
  10. 21
    The King Must Die & The Bull from the Sea by Mary Renault (themulhern)
    themulhern: Young man with special powers and noble blood overthrows the established order through cunning and charisma. In the process he changes his people and then the rot sets in.
  11. 32
    The Lazarus Effect by Frank Herbert (d_perlo)
    d_perlo: So you have read Frank Herbert's Dune series and want more? Thy The Lazarus Effect, The Jesus Incident, and The Ascension Factor, also by Frank Herbert. This is his take on a water world.
  12. 21
    The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: Similar tropes in the form of human computers and a native species capable of granting youth, and the powerful woman trying to breed a special child- The Snow Queen seems on one level a response to Dune, taking many of the same elements and twisting them around, while going in quite different directions in other ways.… (more)
  13. 11
    The Broken God by David Zindell (whiten06)
    whiten06: Another coming-of-age story with the protagonist gaining god-like knowledge through the use of hallucinogens.
  14. 33
    Singularity Sky by Charles Stross (hyper7)
    hyper7: Singularity Sky could have been set in the Dune universe.
  15. 11
    Beowulf's Children by Larry Niven (ed.pendragon)
    ed.pendragon: Similar approach to exploring ecology of a fictional planet while adding to the mix of myth-inspired human interaction.
  16. 22
    Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson (wvlibrarydude)
    wvlibrarydude: Substance gives power to individual. Lots of political intrigue with interesting characters.
  17. 23
    The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan (LaPhenix)
    LaPhenix: Another messiah story drawing inspiration from similar sources.
  18. 13
    Even Peons are People: Interplanetary Justice by D. Pak (philAbrams)
    philAbrams: Little things that just add up, despite different major themes.
  19. 26
    National Lampoon's Doon by Ellis Weiner (TomWaitsTables)
  20. 410
    Moby Dick by Herman Melville (LamontCranston)
    LamontCranston: I once heard Harlan Ellison talking about how some works are unadaptable into film and he cited Dune and Moby-Dick And thinking about it, both works use their story telling as platforms for ruminations on well everything about life

(see all 21 recommendations)

1960s (18)
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English (372)  Italian (3)  Dutch (2)  German (1)  Hebrew (1)  All (379)
Showing 1-5 of 372 (next | show all)
I listened to the audio book narrated by Scott Brick, Orlagh Cassidy, Evan Morton, Simon Vance and Iliana Kadushin. It was great. The story is set on the desert planet Arrakis and is the story of Paul Atreides. He will avenge the plot against his noble family and try to prevent a jihad. Is Paul Atreides the fulfillment of the prophecy of a mysterious man known as Maud'dib. The story is one of the first ecology epics, an adventure story and political and has it spiritual/mysticism as well. It won the Nebula Award. It is one of the greatest epic science fiction books. I've had it in the back of my mind to read some days but I must confess, the giant worms kept me from getting to this book. ( )
  Kristelh | Mar 26, 2017 |
(9/10) Well, how to describe my thoughts on Dune?? There are many good reviews on here worth reading that really get into the details of this book so I will attempt a short summary of my own thoughts for you. Dune is a complex novel covering science, religion, space travel, drug addiction, fanaticism, treachery, politics .... the list goes on, it is world building in the absolute extreme.

My favourite parts of the book are the political machinations of Vladimir Harkonnen (what a great name), it really reminded me of what I loved about A Game of Thrones, complicated schemes leading to a conclusion you have no way to guess at. As a great reader of historical fiction I found my way into the world of Dune through it's futuristic feudal system and once I was in I didn't want to leave it, each chapter brought a new idea and a new aspect of this gloriously created world to me, honestly the creativity of this book is breathtaking.

There were only two reasons I didn't give my full 10/10, the ending was strange and abrupt (it's a series so I now need to track down the next book to see what happens next), and the mythology and mysticism confused the hell out of me. I think the scope of the book is very overwhelming and on a reread I will find it easier to get back into the world of Dune. Worth a go though even if you are not a lover of sci-fi, there is enough here to intrigue readers of every genre. ( )
  LiteraryReadaholic | Mar 8, 2017 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot, & Librarything and links at Booklikes, & Goodreads by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Dune
Series: Dune Chronicles #1
Author: Frank Herbert
Rating: 5 Stars
Genre: SFF
Pages: 611
Format: Kindle digital edition


Synopsis: Spoilers

Mortal enemies, House Atreides and House Harkonnen, through political machinations, end up trading control of Arrakis, Dune. The one planet that produces the Spice; an addictive substance that prolongs life, allows the gifted to see glimpses of the future and cannot be artificially reproduced.

Baron Harkonnen has secretly allied himself with the Emperor though and through trickery, deceit and the use of the Emperor's Elite Forces, destroys the Atreides line on Dune. Unknown to him, however, the scion, Paul and his Bene Gesserit trained mother Jessica, have escaped to the desert where they fulfill prophecy for a group of desert dwellers known as the Fremen. Unrivaled warriors, the Fremen believe Paul is the long prophesied savior who will turn Dune into a paradise world. Paul, a product of millenia of Bene Gesserit breeding plans and living in conditions where he is infused with Spice at every turn, takes the next step in human development. He can see the Future, like it was the Past.

With his ability to now destroy the Spice, and hence destroy the Imperium, Paul ascends the Imperial Throne. The Future is firmly set and Paul Muad-dib is at the reins.

However, The Saga of Dune is Far from Over.

My Thoughts:

Phracking Fantastic, what a good book. I read it in '11 and then again in '16 and I found that 5 years seems to be a good amount of time between re-reads. While I enjoyed it this time around, the frission I experienced in '16 was not there. Some things do need a bit of time between tastings.

Since I do plan on re-reading the whole Dune Chronicles, I was keeping an eye out for little glimpses of the future. Not a lot to see, really. Which just cements my thoughts that while Herbert wrote this as a series, Dune itself was really meant as a standalone novel.

The ONLY thing that stuck out to me as a negative was the little dialogue about ecology that the dying character Kynes has with his dead father. While he knows it is a hallucination, it just comes across as Herbert allowing himself to talk about a subject that he's interested in but not strictly related to the immediate plot. It is much more detail oriented than is needed for an understanding of the “Turn Dune into a Fremen Paradise”, ie, a world with Earth normal weather.

I also read this with an eye towards how the Prequels books by his son had influenced me or my perception of events within the book. Honestly, it was very hard to tell. It did feel like I was more influenced by the rest of the Chronicles and the future they hold then anything that came before. But just the fact that I have read the prequels fills in little gaps in my mind that I might not even notice. ( )
1 vote BookstoogeLT | Feb 22, 2017 |
Classic soft science fiction, with focus on politics, some economics, intrigue and personal relationships, even though we are in space. Clever, cynical use of religions and mysticism. Even if one thinks it too fantastic and mystic, one has to appreciate its grand epicness. According to Wikipedia, Dune is claimed to be the best-selling science fiction novel in history. Not sure I will follow up on the whole saga (five more books by Herbert, then 13 more by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson), but this first one is definitely recommended. ( )
  ohernaes | Feb 6, 2017 |
This is a book well worth a second read or two, as with a good movie or favorite novel you can always glean more from multiple visits. Dune is highly adaptable allegorically in that it rang true when it was printed and still applies to our societal gifts and shortcomings today. Even if you aren't a Science Fiction fan, this merits a visit. ( )
  Meghanista | Jan 28, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 372 (next | show all)
As it faces its 50th anniversary, Dune may seem to be a story fading into the past. But I suspect there’s life in Frank Herbert’s masterpiece yet. ... But even 50 years after they reached their pinnacle, it’s Frank Herbert’s skills as a storyteller that will keep Dune alive for many decades to come. Because if there is one truly immortal thing in the universe, it’s a great story.
 
A portrayal of an alien society more complete and deeply detailed than any other author in the field has managed...a story absorbing equally for its action and philosophical vistas.
 
A very long time ago I first read this book. It seized upon my imagination; I'd never read anything like it. I hoped when I picked it up this time, I would still at least enjoy it. I loved it and devoured it once again.

This time, with age and experience, along with a deeper understanding of world religions, I could see so many layers upon layers withi he book. Yes, there is a cracking good story. But there is so much more: religion, politics, culture, statecraft, and the meanings of love. What does it mean to be human? What are we doing by giving our lives over to gadgets that do our figuring and map reading for us? There is much to think on.

I will continue on with the series in a while, once I've had time to think on this book for a while. Anyone interested in science fiction should consider Dune to be a "must read." It is truly a classic that stands the test of time.
 
One of the monuments of modern science fiction.
added by GYKM | editChicago Tribune
 

» Add other authors (28 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Herbert, Frankprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cassidy, OrlaghNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
de Fontaine, DorothyMapsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Di Fate, VincentCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dirda, MichaelIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Herbert, BrianAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morton, EuanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennington, BruceCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schoenherr, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Siudmak, WojciechCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stuyter, M.K.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Toivonen, AnjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weber, SamIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dune (1984IMDb)
Dune (2000IMDb)
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Epigraph
Dedication
To the people whose labours go beyond ideas into the realm of 'real materials' - to the dry-land ecologists, wherever they may be, in whatever time they work, this effort at prediction is dedicated in humility and admiration.
First words
A beginning is the time for taking the most delicate care that the balances are correct... from "Manual of Muad'dib" by the Princess Irulan
In the week before their departure to Arakis, when all the final scurrying about had reached a nearly unbearable frenzy, an old crone came to visit the mother of the boy, Paul.
Quotations
I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.
Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic.
Let us not rail about justice as long as we have arms and the freedom to use them.
The thing the ecologically illiterate don't realize about an ecosystem is that it's a system. A system! A system maintains a certain fluid stability that can be destroyed by a misstep in just one niche. A system has order, a flowing from point to point. If something dams the flow, order collapses. The untrained miss the collapse until too late. That's why the highest function of ecology is the understanding of consequences.
The willow submits to the wind and prospers until one day it is many willows — a wall against the wind. This is the willow's purpose.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
If you are combining a translated copy please check carefully as in some languages this book was split into two volumes. In some languages there is a single volume edition and a split edition - you should only combine the single volume edition with the English edition. Languages known to have multiple-volumes: French, German,
Publisher's editors
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Book description
Set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar empire where planetary fiefdoms are controlled by noble Houses that owe an allegiance to the Imperial House Corrino, Dune tells the story of young Paul Atreides (heir apparent to Duke Leto Atreides and scion of House Atreides) as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis, the only source of the spice melange, the most important and valuable substance in the universe. The story explores the complex and multilayered interactions of politics, religion, ecology, technology, and human emotion, as forces of the Empire confront each other for control of Arrakis and its spice.

AR 5.7, 28 Pts
Haiku summary
Foretold one gets dumped
in desert, then goes native.
Returns, beats baddies!
(ed.pendragon)
Fear the mind killer
Worm vomit expands the mind
Kwisatz Haderach
(amweb)

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0441013597, Paperback)

This Hugo and Nebula Award winner tells the sweeping tale of a desert planet called Arrakis, the focus of an intricate power struggle in a byzantine interstellar empire. Arrakis is the sole source of Melange, the "spice of spices." Melange is necessary for interstellar travel and grants psychic powers and longevity, so whoever controls it wields great influence.

The troubles begin when stewardship of Arrakis is transferred by the Emperor from the Harkonnen Noble House to House Atreides. The Harkonnens don't want to give up their privilege, though, and through sabotage and treachery they cast young Duke Paul Atreides out into the planet's harsh environment to die. There he falls in with the Fremen, a tribe of desert dwellers who become the basis of the army with which he will reclaim what's rightfully his. Paul Atreides, though, is far more than just a usurped duke. He might be the end product of a very long-term genetic experiment designed to breed a super human; he might be a messiah. His struggle is at the center of a nexus of powerful people and events, and the repercussions will be felt throughout the Imperium.

Dune is one of the most famous science fiction novels ever written, and deservedly so. The setting is elaborate and ornate, the plot labyrinthine, the adventures exciting. Five sequels follow. --Brooks Peck

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:37 -0400)

(see all 10 descriptions)

This Hugo and Nebula Award winner tells the sweeping tale of a desert planet called Arrakis, the focus of an intricate power struggle in a byzantine interstellar empire. Arrakis is the sole source of Melange, the "spice of spices." Melange is necessary for interstellar travel and grants psychic powers and longevity, so whoever controls it wields great influence. The troubles begin when stewardship of Arrakis is transferred by the Emperor from the Harkonnen Noble House to House Atreides. The Harkonnens don't want to give up their privilege, though, and through sabotage and treachery they cast young Duke Paul Atreides out into the planet's harsh environment to die. There he falls in with the Fremen, a tribe of desert dwellers who become the basis of the army with which he will reclaim what's rightfully his. Paul Atreides, though, is far more than just a usurped duke. He might be the end product of a very long-term genetic experiment designed to breed a super human; he might be a messiah. His struggle is at the center of a nexus of powerful people and events, and the repercussions will be felt throughout the Imperium. Dune is one of the most famous science fiction novels ever written, and deservedly so. The setting is elaborate and ornate, the plot labyrinthine, the adventures exciting.… (more)

» see all 15 descriptions

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