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Dune by Frank Herbert
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Dune (1965)

by Frank Herbert

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Dune (1), Dune Saga (12)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
27,45141165 (4.29)3 / 786
Recently added bymmaestiho, private library, SoutheastMBLibrary, rnmdfrd, snotbottom, LisCarey, oldenoughdk, farosso, Erniei
Legacy LibrariesTerence Kemp McKenna
  1. 319
    Foundation by Isaac Asimov (Patangel, JonTheTerrible, philAbrams)
    JonTheTerrible: The pace of these books are similar as well as the topics they cover: society and government. The science plays only a small role in both books but is present enough to successfully build the worlds in which the characters inhabit.
  2. 123
    Hyperion by Dan Simmons (corporate_clone)
    corporate_clone: It is difficult not to compare Dune and Hyperion, even though both series have major differences in terms of tone, style and philosophy. Those are two long, epic, elaborate and very ambitious sci-fi masterpieces where religion plays a key role. I would highly recommend the fans of one to check out the other.… (more)
  3. 60
    The Faded Sun Trilogy by C. J. Cherryh (reading_fox)
    reading_fox: Same basic sort of premise - SciFi set on desert worlds inspires the rise of a galactic empire, but very different outcomes!
  4. 82
    Gateway by Frederik Pohl (Vonini)
  5. 30
    A Door Into Ocean by Joan Slonczewski (Anonymous user)
  6. 41
    Grass by Sheri S. Tepper (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the description of the planet.
  7. 20
    Bright of the Sky by Kay Kenyon (amysisson)
    amysisson: Different in tone, but similar in scope, plus it's also about the lengths to which empires will go to maintain the status quo.
  8. 31
    The Word for World is Forest by Ursula K. Le Guin (andomck)
    andomck: Ecological science fiction.
  9. 86
    Lord Valentine's Castle by Robert Silverberg (corporate_clone)
    corporate_clone: Both books are a subtle blend of science fiction and fantasy while being truly epic stories. Although Dune remains a superior literary achievement in my view, Silverberg's Majipoor series is a credible alternative.
  10. 43
    Singularity Sky by Charles Stross (hyper7)
    hyper7: Singularity Sky could have been set in the Dune universe.
  11. 21
    The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: Similar tropes in the form of human computers and a native species capable of granting youth, and the powerful woman trying to breed a special child- The Snow Queen seems on one level a response to Dune, taking many of the same elements and twisting them around, while going in quite different directions in other ways.… (more)
  12. 21
    Marrow by Robert Reed (Sandwich76)
  13. 21
    The King Must Die & The Bull from the Sea by Mary Renault (themulhern)
    themulhern: Young man with special powers and noble blood overthrows the established order through cunning and charisma. In the process he changes his people and then the rot sets in.
  14. 32
    The Lazarus Effect by Frank Herbert (d_perlo)
    d_perlo: So you have read Frank Herbert's Dune series and want more? Thy The Lazarus Effect, The Jesus Incident, and The Ascension Factor, also by Frank Herbert. This is his take on a water world.
  15. 10
    The Enterprise of Death by Jesse Bullington (Sandwich76)
  16. 22
    Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson (wvlibrarydude)
    wvlibrarydude: Substance gives power to individual. Lots of political intrigue with interesting characters.
  17. 11
    The Broken God by David Zindell (whiten06)
    whiten06: Another coming-of-age story with the protagonist gaining god-like knowledge through the use of hallucinogens.
  18. 12
    Beowulf's Children by Larry Niven (ed.pendragon)
    ed.pendragon: Similar approach to exploring ecology of a fictional planet while adding to the mix of myth-inspired human interaction.
  19. 13
    Even Peons are People: Interplanetary Justice by D. Pak (philAbrams)
    philAbrams: Little things that just add up, despite different major themes.
  20. 24
    The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan (LaPhenix)
    LaPhenix: Another messiah story drawing inspiration from similar sources.

(see all 23 recommendations)

1960s (18)
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English (400)  Italian (3)  Dutch (2)  German (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (407)
Showing 1-5 of 400 (next | show all)
I'm too good a person to waste my time on this book. Lazy writing, impossibly slow, 1 dimensional characterization, all tell no show etc etc it was a bad time. ( )
  ireneattolia | Sep 3, 2018 |
Dune is a classic scifi novel, which can mean it's anywhere between breathtaking genius and hardly accessible anymore. I found it a bit difficult to get into at first, similar to Ancillary Justice. Once I grew used to the storytelling device of an aggressively all-knowing narrator (frequently giving both/all inner views to all sides of a conversation), the world-building was fascinating, and despite the extensive narrator-explanations the reader is forced to make connections themself. My only misgiving was that large parts of the plot were too laid-out: the Mary-Sue protagonist, the evil antagonists, the good Fremen warriors etc. I hope that further parts in the series alleviate the clear-cut morals and abilities of the characters a bit. I'm looking forward to it – the world-building was exemplary. (Also, I can finally watch the movie now.) ( )
  _rixx_ | Aug 30, 2018 |
Wow ( )
  CharleyBethH | Aug 23, 2018 |
A great book full of grand themes.

Time has only made it grander in its vision. I mean, there was a time when Islam wasn't the great, dangerous "other" to Western eyes. Moderate Islam had an appeal to the west, for example, Goethe's west-eastern Divan. Dune stands in this tradition. It describes a world which is full of Islamic thought. It is world in which Islam probably pushed aside Christianity to become the world's leading religion. In demographic terms, Herbert will most likely turn out to be correct. Also, Paul Atreides is a soldier as well as a religious leader, that means, he is not a Jesus figure (who was not a soldier); he is a Mohamed, the leader of a state and of a religion. Then there are the themes of climate change, genetic engineering, the artificiality of religion, which were prophetic. Herbert had a keen eye for the themes that would dominate the next decades (centuries?)

And then there's the literary impact, for example, the way the inner thoughts of the characters is written in italic. “The Song of Ice and Fire” copies that. And thinking about it, the story arc of Robb Stark has similarities to that of Paul Atreides: their fathers are being made an offer they can't refuse and are being forced to relocate to a hostile environment (the desert/the south); the fathers die in a political intrigue and the son and his mother lead the army to avenge them; if it wasn't for the Red Wedding, Robb Stark's arc would have (almost) been the story of Paul Atreides. However, the supernatural elements of the Atreides' character are transferred to Bran Stark.

I don’t like all the sequels; had to read book 5 and 6 twice though to really mildly enjoy them, and the philosophical basis of the narratives wears thin at some point. I mean, the sequels mostly tell stories that are being described as logical consequences of their predecessors. Paul Atreides's rise must lead to his downfall. Leto Atreides does what Paul couldn't do, and then things happen the way Leto predicted them. And then the books stop before the ulterior motive (possibly shoehorned into the Dune world at the time of book 4) is revealed. But I guess the Star Wars novels sort of picked up that concept with the Yuuzhan Vong.

Some random thoughts:

- The more recent mini-series version of Dune & Children of Dune provided a story much closer to Frank Herbert's original;

- David Lynch's version still gives me nightmares - the scenes on Salusa Secundus are quite horrifying; I always knew the Harkonnens were bad from the book, but that bad? whoa. On the other hand there are some aspects I think Lynch really did well - the Giger-esque sets were based on the sketches for Jodorowsky's film. Sting in cod-piece? Classic!

- The music by Toto was still pretty good, and don't forget one of Brian Eno's most famous pieces "Prophecy" is used for Paul's first vision. Also Patrick Stewart as... Patrick Stewart. Actually Gurney Halleck, but since I saw him in this before Sting I picture him more as a lute-playing scottish-sounding psychopath;

- What amazed me about the original Dune series was how almost all the real action occurred 'off screen' as it were; the narration only showed action scenes that were very small, but highly pivotal events. This evokes to me the real coverage of wars we see in the media - we only see 'news-bytes' and little 30 second vignettes of what a clearly larger, far more complex events. Growing up reading action novels and other media like Star Wars or Star Trek, Dune was a real eye-opener to another way of story-telling, and I felt a superior one;

- I gave up on the mini-series almost immediately, due to the fact they gave away the big twist at the end of the novel very early on, as if it were no big deal. Paul's eventual control of the Spice on Arrakis gives him complete control over the so called Spacing Guild (who have a monopoly on space travel) and therefore over interstellar travel, due to the fact that the Spacing Guild need the Spice to make interstellar calculations. This is the big reveal at the end of the novel. It's this complete control of the Spice that gives Paul complete power over the empire. The Spacing Guild had been keeping their total reliance on the Spice a secret. The first prequel novel also made it seem as if everyone knew the Spacing Guild were completely reliant on Spice for their abilities. I gave up on it almost immediately. Yes, I'm a Dune nerd;

- As for George Lucas, I had read Dune by the time I saw 'The Empire Strikes Back' so I was well aware of how much George Lucas outright plagiarized it. 'Dune Sea' - verbatim. Sandpeople = Fremen, Mos Eisley = Arrakeen, Jabba's Palace = Ducal Palace / Paul's Palace, Moisture farmers, sandcrawlers, the skeleton of what is clearly a sandworm, the Sarlac; rather pathetic. I seem to recall Mr Herbert was disgusted by the wholesale rip-off of many of his themes;

- Tried to read all of the prequels as well, seduced by their bullshit claim of having found a trove of Frank's notes, but once I got to Dune 7 and read the hack, trite garbage they had coming out of my beloved characters' mouths I realize I had been royally buggered. Literately speaking;

- Another ingredient was Charles L. Harness for the semi-permeable shields causing a return to swordplay and a lot of the drugged-up superbrain stuff.

(View from above)

- The basic point about 'Dune' was that it came just after Mariner IV robbed writers of the default exotic locale of Barsoom. Arrakis is one of the first times an author had to invent a planet from scratch to do this sort of thing, rather than as an end in itself as Hal Clement had been doing;

- My memory of the sequels is that the "odd" books were good and the "even" books were terrible, though I confess that the only one I ever return to is the first, and the way Herbert built major changes into his future-history is something I probably overlooked at the time;

In all of the above-mentioned points it's an odd kind of SF; Dune’s world is entirely self-contained. Herbert also had the knack (beautifully developed further by the late great Iain M. Banks) of dropping just enough hints about the historical origins of his world and other "off-stage" establishing details - enough to make you believe that he conceived a totality, without having to explicitly spell it out. ( )
7 vote antao | Aug 18, 2018 |
I read this for a class and I just really struggled with it...a lot! There were some great quotes that I took away from it, but otherwise I actually suffered actual pain (definitely in the head). This is due more to my dislike of space opera than anything else. Plus...keeping up with all the names of characters and places and having to use a glossary really got to me after a while.

( )
  booksandcats4ever | Jul 30, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 400 (next | show all)
Why is Blanch’s influence on Dune worth recognizing? Celebrating Blanch is not a means to discredit Herbert, whose imaginative novel transcends the sum of its influences. But Dune remains massively popular while The Sabres of Paradise languishes in relative obscurity, and renewed public interest in Blanch’s forgotten history would be a welcome development.

Isaac Asimov’s Foundation trilogy was famously inspired by Edward Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. J. R. R. Tolkien’s background in medieval languages helped shape the mythology of Middle Earth. Frank Herbert’s Dune is no different, and rediscovering one of the book’s most significant influences is a rewarding experience.
 
One of the monuments of modern science fiction.
added by GYKM | editChicago Tribune
 

» Add other authors (23 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Herbert, FrankAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cassidy, OrlaghNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
de Fontaine, DorothyMapsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Di Fate, VincentCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dirda, MichaelIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Herbert, BrianAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morton, EuanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennington, BruceCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schoenherr, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Siudmak, WojciechCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stuyter, M.K.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Toivonen, AnjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weber, SamIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dune (1984IMDb)
Dune (2000IMDb)
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To the people whose labours go beyond ideas into the realm of 'real materials' - to the dry-land ecologists, wherever they may be, in whatever time they work, this effort at prediction is dedicated in humility and admiration.
First words
A beginning is the time for taking the most delicate care that the balances are correct... from "Manual of Muad'dib" by the Princess Irulan
In the week before their departure to Arakis, when all the final scurrying about had reached a nearly unbearable frenzy, an old crone came to visit the mother of the boy, Paul.
Quotations
I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.
Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic.
Let us not rail about justice as long as we have arms and the freedom to use them.
The thing the ecologically illiterate don't realize about an ecosystem is that it's a system. A system! A system maintains a certain fluid stability that can be destroyed by a misstep in just one niche. A system has order, a flowing from point to point. If something dams the flow, order collapses. The untrained miss the collapse until too late. That's why the highest function of ecology is the understanding of consequences.
The willow submits to the wind and prospers until one day it is many willows — a wall against the wind. This is the willow's purpose.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
If you are combining a translated copy please check carefully as in some languages this book was split into two volumes. In some languages there is a single volume edition and a split edition - you should only combine the single volume edition with the English edition. Languages known to have multiple-volumes: French, German,
Publisher's editors
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Book description
Set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar empire where planetary fiefdoms are controlled by noble Houses that owe an allegiance to the Imperial House Corrino, Dune tells the story of young Paul Atreides (heir apparent to Duke Leto Atreides and scion of House Atreides) as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis, the only source of the spice melange, the most important and valuable substance in the universe. The story explores the complex and multilayered interactions of politics, religion, ecology, technology, and human emotion, as forces of the Empire confront each other for control of Arrakis and its spice.

AR 5.7, 28 Pts
Haiku summary
Foretold one gets dumped
in desert, then goes native.
Returns, beats baddies!
(ed.pendragon)
Fear the mind killer
Worm vomit expands the mind
Kwisatz Haderach
(amweb)

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0441013597, Paperback)

This Hugo and Nebula Award winner tells the sweeping tale of a desert planet called Arrakis, the focus of an intricate power struggle in a byzantine interstellar empire. Arrakis is the sole source of Melange, the "spice of spices." Melange is necessary for interstellar travel and grants psychic powers and longevity, so whoever controls it wields great influence.

The troubles begin when stewardship of Arrakis is transferred by the Emperor from the Harkonnen Noble House to House Atreides. The Harkonnens don't want to give up their privilege, though, and through sabotage and treachery they cast young Duke Paul Atreides out into the planet's harsh environment to die. There he falls in with the Fremen, a tribe of desert dwellers who become the basis of the army with which he will reclaim what's rightfully his. Paul Atreides, though, is far more than just a usurped duke. He might be the end product of a very long-term genetic experiment designed to breed a super human; he might be a messiah. His struggle is at the center of a nexus of powerful people and events, and the repercussions will be felt throughout the Imperium.

Dune is one of the most famous science fiction novels ever written, and deservedly so. The setting is elaborate and ornate, the plot labyrinthine, the adventures exciting. Five sequels follow. --Brooks Peck

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:37 -0400)

(see all 10 descriptions)

This Hugo and Nebula Award winner tells the sweeping tale of a desert planet called Arrakis, the focus of an intricate power struggle in a byzantine interstellar empire. Arrakis is the sole source of Melange, the "spice of spices." Melange is necessary for interstellar travel and grants psychic powers and longevity, so whoever controls it wields great influence. The troubles begin when stewardship of Arrakis is transferred by the Emperor from the Harkonnen Noble House to House Atreides. The Harkonnens don't want to give up their privilege, though, and through sabotage and treachery they cast young Duke Paul Atreides out into the planet's harsh environment to die. There he falls in with the Fremen, a tribe of desert dwellers who become the basis of the army with which he will reclaim what's rightfully his. Paul Atreides, though, is far more than just a usurped duke. He might be the end product of a very long-term genetic experiment designed to breed a super human; he might be a messiah. His struggle is at the center of a nexus of powerful people and events, and the repercussions will be felt throughout the Imperium. Dune is one of the most famous science fiction novels ever written, and deservedly so. The setting is elaborate and ornate, the plot labyrinthine, the adventures exciting.… (more)

» see all 19 descriptions

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