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Clear and Present Danger by Tom Clancy
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Clear and Present Danger (original 1989; edition 1989)

by Tom Clancy

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4,73428991 (3.73)27
Member:EdwardShuman
Title:Clear and Present Danger
Authors:Tom Clancy
Info:G. P. Putnam's Sons (1989), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 656 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:**1/2
Tags:fiction

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Clear and Present Danger by Tom Clancy (1989)

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Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
My first audio book, and it is abridged so i cant help but think there was something missing from the other Clancy works ive read. The action sequences seemed a bit clipped and overall it sounded more like a movie screenplay than a book. On the up side the entire story appears to have been told in just 3 CDs so there is not nearly the same amount of content. But a story of a new stealth bomb being used by a covert light infantry squad sent in to enemy territory while political stuff happens back in DC. I still liked it better than the movie... ( )
  T4NK | Sep 30, 2014 |
On first reading:
This is the first Tom Clancy book I have read, and I absolutely loved it. It's a fantastic book. It does demand all your attention to follow all the characters introduced at different times of the book, but in the end you see how it all intertwines. Clancy is a stickler for detail, but instead of slowing down the events, it provides a good insight to them that allows you to really understand what's going on. I will definitely read more Clancy in the future.

On second reading:
Just as good as I remember. I really enjoyed this reread of a great book by a masterful storyteller. ( )
  crashmyparty | Feb 26, 2014 |
I finally got around to reading the book having seen the movie many times. The novel is good, classic Clancy, but my lasting thought was a new-found appreciation for the art of screenwriting. Compression is the most obvious technique you think of when it comes to putting a book on screen, but this is one of the best demonstrations of how playing with fundamental plot and character attributions can make for a movie that achieves greater emotional impact and clarity of character motivation and conflict than the source material.

The movie's not without its faults of course. It has some of my favourite "How Hollywood Thinks Tech Works" moments. Their attempts to dazzle the audience with high-tech computer mumbo-jumbo are especially laughable in retrospect (look for some woefully unconvincing "computer code" about 90 minutes in, not to mention hacking passwords by guessing birthdate transposition. 133t! ;-) ( )
  pratalife | Feb 9, 2014 |
I finally got around to reading the book having seen the movie many times. The novel is good, classic Clancy, but my lasting thought was a new-found appreciation for the art of screenwriting. Compression is the most obvious technique you think of when it comes to putting a book on screen, but this is one of the best demonstrations of how playing with fundamental plot and character attributions can make for a movie that achieves greater emotional impact and clarity of character motivation and conflict than the source material.

The movie's not without its faults of course. It has some of my favourite "How Hollywood Thinks Tech Works" moments. Their attempts to dazzle the audience with high-tech computer mumbo-jumbo are especially laughable in retrospect (look for some woefully unconvincing "computer code" about 90 minutes in, not to mention hacking passwords by guessing birthdate transposition. 133t! ;-) ( )
  pratalife | Feb 9, 2014 |
This was my first foray into the world of Tom Clancy (aside from seeing the film version of "The Hunt for Red October") and I thoroughly enjoyed the tale of high -tech military actions targeted at damaging the dangerous Columbian drug cartel. Clancy knows his politics and doesn't shy away from exploring the ethical considerations of military action and political decision-making.

I understood when I picked up this book that I should be prepared for some dated technology, and aside from the obvious improvements in the militarization of digital and computer-based technologies (and perhaps also the use of drones), the story read very realistically and didn't suffer an ounce in its' excitement and intensity.

I had no real background of Clancy's Jack Ryan, nor the enigmatic John Clark. I found both to be a little two dimensional, but honestly didn't care very much either. The story was seeped in political intrigue and military tactics - and these elements provided enough jet fuel to propel the story. ( )
1 vote JGolomb | Aug 13, 2013 |
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Epigraph
Law, without force, is impotent.
-Pascal
It is the function of police to exercise force, or to threaten it, in execution of the state's purpose, internally and under normal conditions. It is the function of armed forces to exercise force, or the threat of it, externally in normal times and internally only in times that are abnormal . . .

Dedication
In the memory of John Ball,
Friend and teacher,
The professional who took the last plane out
First words
The room was still empty.
Quotations
The painting was accomplished in the Florida Strait, as was something even more important. Wegener had been on the bridge, napping in his leather chair during the forenoon watch when the growler phone rang, and Chief Owens invited him to the engine room. Wegner arrived to find the only worktable covered with plans, and an engineman-apprentice hovering over them, with his engineering officer standing behind him. “You ain’t gonna believe it,” Owens announced. “Tell him, sonny.” “Seaman Obrecki, sir. The engine isn’t installed right,” the youngster said. “What makes you think that?” Wegner asked. The big marine diesels were of a new sort, perversely designed to be very easy to operate and maintain. To aid in this, small how-to manuals were provided for each engine-room crewman, and in each manual was a plastic-coated diagram that was far easier to use than the builder’s plans. A blow-up of the manual schematic, also plastic coated, had been provided by the drafting company, and was the laminated top of the worktable. “Sir, this engine is a lot like the one on my dad’s tractor, bigger, but – “ “I’ll take your word for it, Obrecki.” “The turbocharger ain’t installed right. It matches with these plans here, but the oil pump pushes the oil through the turbocharger backwards. The plans are wrong, sir. Some draftsman screwed up. See here, sir? The oil line’s supposed to come in here, but the draftsman put it on the wrong side of this fitting, and nobody caught it, and –“ Wegener just laughed. He looked at Chief Owens: “ How long to fix?” “Obrecki says he can have it up and running this time tomorrow, Cap’n.” “Sir.” It was Lieutenant Michelson, the engineering officer. “This is all my fault, I should have –“ The lieutenant was waiting for the sky to fall. “The lesson from this, Mr. Michelson, is that you can’t even trust the manual. Have you learned that lesson, Mister?” “Yes, sir!” “Fair enough. Obrecki, you’re a seaman-first, right?” “Yes, sir.” “Wrong. You’re a machinist-mate third.” “Sir, I have to pass a written exam…” “You think Obrecki’s passed that exam, Mr. Michelson?” “You bet, sir.” “Well done, people. This time tomorrow I want to do twenty-three knots.” And it had all been downhill from there. The engines are the mechanical heart of any ship, and there is no seaman in the world who prefers a slow ship to a fast one. When Panache had made twenty-five knots and held that speed for three hours, the painters painted better, the cooks took a little more time with the meals, and the technicians tightened their bolts just a little more. Their ship was no longer a cripple, and pride broke out in the crew like a rainbow after a summer shower – all the more so because one of their own had figured it out. One day early, Panache came into the Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard with a bone in her teeth. Wegner had the conn and pushed his own skill to the limit to make a fast “one-bell” approach to the dock. “The Old Man,” one line handler noted on the fo’c’sle, “really knows how to drive this fuckin’ boat!” The next day a poster appeared on the ship’s bulletin board” PANACHE: DASHING ELEGANCE OF MANNER OR STYLE. Seven weeks later, the cutter was brought into commission and she sailed south to Mobile, Alabama, to go to work. Already she had a reputation that exactly matched her name.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0425122123, Mass Market Paperback)

At the end of the prologue to Clear and Present Danger, Clancy writes, "And so began something that had not quite begun and would not soon end, with many people in many places moving off in directions and on missions which they all mistakenly thought they understood. That was just as well. The future was too fearful for contemplation, and beyond the expected, illusory finish lines were things fated by the decisions made this morning--and, once decided, best unseen." In Clear and Present Danger nothing is as clear as it may seem.

The president, unsatisfied with the success of his "war on drugs," decides that he wants some immediate success. But after John Clark's covert strike team is deployed to Colombia for Operation Showboat, the drug lords strike back taking several civilian casualties. The chief executive's polls plummet. He orders Ritter to terminate their unofficial plan and leave no traces. Jack Ryan, who has just been named CIA deputy director of intelligence is enraged when he discovers that has been left out of the loop of Colombian operations. Several of America's most highly trained soldiers are stranded in an unfinished mission that, according to all records, never existed. Ryan decides to get the men out.

Ultimately, Clear and Present Danger is about good conscience, law, and politics, with Jack Ryan and CIA agent John Clark as its dual heroes. Ryan relentlessly pursues what he knows is right and legal, even if it means confronting the president of the United States. Clark is the perfect soldier, but a man who finally holds his men higher than the orders of any careless commander.

Along with the usual, stunning array of military hardware and the latest techno-gadgets, Clear and Present Danger further develops the relationships and characters that Clancy fans have grown to love. Admiral James Greer passes the CIA torch to his pupil, Ryan. Mr. Clark and Chavez meet for the first time. Other recurring characters like Robert Ritter and "the President" add continuity to Clancy's believable, alternate reality. This is Clancy at his best. --Patrick O'Kelley

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:46:36 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

The assassinations of U.S. ambassador and the visiting head of the F.B.I. by Colombian drug lords trigger a mysterious covert response and an investigation of U.S. and Colombian actions by Jack Ryan.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 11 descriptions

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