Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Skeletons at the Feast by Chris Bohjalian

Skeletons at the Feast (2008)

by Chris Bohjalian

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,287656,086 (3.97)87
  1. 20
    Sophie's Choice by William Styron (Othemts)
  2. 10
    The Welsh Girl by Peter Ho Davies (Othemts)
  3. 00
    All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr (cataylor)
  4. 00
    The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah (cataylor)
  5. 00
    Stones From The River by Ursula Hegi (cataylor)
  6. 11
    The Postmistress by Sarah Blake (starfishian)
  7. 00
    A Thread of Grace by Mary Doria Russell (mrstreme)
  8. 00
    Day After Night by Anita Diamant (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: In spite of the end of World War II, the survivors in these two bleak novels are still feeling its effects as they struggle with emotional fallout and fight for survival in their new situations.

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 87 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
Hmmm... I pushed myself to read up to the halfway point, but that's as far as I got. I usually love these kind of reads and this one had potential, but it followed way too many people. I couldn't connect to any of the characters because the story was so scattered. We got a little bit here, a little bit there... it was so slow paced! I loved the action parts, but those were rare. I do not recommend this book unless you like a book that pushes and pulls you in a million different directions. ( )
  ReadersCandyb | Oct 7, 2016 |
1945 World War II about the many refugees who trecked to reach British and American lines. It was well written and very good, but horrific because that was true for so many of the jews, and many others who were caught up in the war. Listened on audio Mark Bramhall ( )
  Indygirl | Aug 5, 2016 |
A bleak and often shocking depiction of Germany at the end of WWII, seen through the eyes of a German family fleeing the advancing Red Army, a Jew who has escaped transportation, a British POW and a French Jew in a labour camp. It would be fair to say that the atrocity count is quite high. The different viewpoints enable to author to explore attitudes of the time, particularly towards Hitler's treatment of the Jews, which the family at the centre of the story are all but unaware of. It is well written and illuminating, but I suspect it will be the shocking images that will stay with me. ( )
  jayne_charles | May 19, 2016 |
Excellent audio production. Nothing is glossed over - the descriptions of the violence perpetrated are graphic and painful. The surprise ending seemed a little tacked on, but fine just the same. Still hard to imagine how it was possible. ( )
  MaureenCean | Feb 2, 2016 |
In the last waning days of World War II, Germany was in chaos. Besieged on western front by the Americans and the British and on the eastern front by the Russians, the German people were forced to flee their homes. Cold, hungry, and pushed beyond exhaustion they struggled to keep ahead of the Russian front though and endless winter. What they faced if caught by the Russians, no matter that most were women and young children, was enough for many to craft suicide plans while others would just give up, long beyond caring.

Skeletons at the Feast weaves together four disparate stories during this tragic and violent time in history; the Emmerich family, a prosperous Prussian family forced to abandon their home; Callum, a Scottish POW who had been sent to help work the Emmerich's sugar-beat farm and apple orchards; Uri Singer, a Jewish man who through courage and daring escaped a train headed towards certain death and for two years successfully disguised himself as a Nazi; and Cecile a French Jewess struggling to survive German work camps and forced marches.

This is a bleak and unrelenting portrayal of the Holocaust told through a completely unique perspective. Most of the story is viewed through the eyes of Anna Emmerich, eighteen years old and having lived her whole life in a remote corner of Germany that had for most of her life been ceded to Poland. It is unusual that Bohjalian chose to tell the story through the eyes of a German girl as so often novels regarding this horrific time in history are told through those who suffered the most. Yet the Jews, the Gypsies, and their fellow Nazi victims were not the only people to suffer. The privatizations suffered by Germany's own people as they fled in advance of the Russian advance is an often overlooked piece of history. Their treatment was brutal and no quarter was given for being a civilian, a woman, or a child. The author does not hold back; there are many violent and bloody depictions of rape and murder throughout the novel. It was often difficult to read. Yet none of these scenes felt gratuitous. It was an honest account of what really happened. It serves as a reminder of the cruelty that we humans are capable of, no matter on which side we fight. The epilogue was the single bright source of hope at the end of the novel, a welcome relief after the bleakness of the previous 350 pages. This novel is not for the faint of heart, but it is a must read for any World War II buff. ( )
  Mootastic1 | Jan 15, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
The past is never dead. It's not even past. - William Faulkner
For Stephen Kiernan, Adam Turteltaub, and Dana Yeaton
And for Victoria, who reads every word
First words
The girl - a young woman, really, eighteen, hair the color of corn silk - had been hearing the murmur of artillery fire for two days now.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
In January 1945, in the waning months of World War II, a small group of people begin the longest journey of their lives: an attempt to cross the remnants of the Third Reich, from the Russian front to the Rhine if necessary, to reach the British and American lines.

Among the group is eighteen-year-old Anna Emmerich, the daughter of Prussian aristocrats. There is her lover, Callum Finella, a twenty-year-old Scottish prisoner of war who was brought from the stalag to her family's farm as forced labor. And there is a twenty-six-year-old Wehrmacht corporal, who the pair know as Manfred-who is, in reality, Uri Singer, a Jew from Germany who managed to escape a train bound for Auschwitz. As they work their way west, they encounter a countryside ravaged by war. Their flight will test both Anna's and Callum's love, as well as their friendship with Manfred-assuming any of them even survive. Perhaps not since "The English Patient" has a novel so deftly captured both the power and poignancy of romance and the terror and tragedy of war. Skillfully portraying the flesh and blood of history, Chris Bohjalian has crafted a rich tapestry that puts a face on one of the twentieth centrury's greatest tragedies-while creating, perhaps, a masterpiece that will haunt readers for generations.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307394964, Paperback)

A masterful love story set against a backdrop of epic history and unforgettable courage

In the waning months of World War II, a small group of people begin the longest journey of their lives.

At the center is eighteen-year-old Anna, the daughter of Prussian aristocrats, and her first love, a twenty-year-old Scottish prisoner of war named Callum. With his boyish good looks and his dedication to her family, he has captured Anna’s heart. But he is the enemy, and their love must remain a closely guarded secret. Only Manfred, a twenty-six-year-old Wehrmacht corporal, knows the truth. And Manfred, who is not what he seems to be, is reluctantly taken with Anna, just as she finds herself drawn uncomfortably to him.

As these unlikely allies work their way west, their flight will test both Anna’s and Callum’s love, as well as their friendship with Manfred–and will forever bind the young trio together.

Includes special bonus material: Chris Bohjalian responds to questions from book groups and readers

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:34 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

As Hitler's Third Reich crumbles, an aristocratic Prussian woman and her child flee west away from the approaching Russian army. Eventually they form an unlikely alliance with a Jewish man escaping from the concentration camps.

» see all 6 descriptions

LibraryThing Author

Chris Bohjalian is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
5 avail.
147 wanted
3 pay4 pay

Popular covers


Average: (3.97)
1 5
1.5 1
2 21
2.5 7
3 52
3.5 20
4 174
4.5 32
5 104


2 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions


You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 109,837,271 books! | Top bar: Always visible