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Little Brother by Cory Doctorow
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Little Brother

by Cory Doctorow

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Little Brother (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,9303261,310 (4.06)2 / 248
  1. 211
    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (JFDR)
    JFDR: 1984's Big Brother is Little Brother's namesake.
  2. 100
    Feed by M. T. Anderson (snozzberry)
  3. 50
    For the Win by Cory Doctorow (jshrop)
  4. 51
    Makers by Cory Doctorow (SheReads)
  5. 51
    The Hacker Crackdown: Law And Disorder On The Electronic Frontier by Bruce Sterling (persky)
    persky: The book that turned Doctorow on to the EFF and a real world account of various government agencies cracking down on teenage hackers.
  6. 31
    Eastern Standard Tribe by Cory Doctorow (ahstrick)
  7. 20
    After by Francine Prose (meggyweg)
  8. 10
    The Gospel According to Larry by Janet Tashjian (JFDR)
  9. 10
    The Media Monopoly by Ben H. Bagdikian (strande)
    strande: In chapter thirteen, Ange and Marcus call the media whores. "In fact, that's an insult to hardworking whores everywhere. They're, they're profiteers." Media Monopoly is a whole book about how the media turned into profiteers.
  10. 10
    Kiki Strike: Inside the Shadow City by Kirsten Miller (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For knowledge, the use and distribution, general purpose. Best for teens.
  11. 10
    So Yesterday by Scott Westerfeld (snozzberry)
  12. 10
    Geeks: How Two Lost Boys Rode the Internet Out of Idaho by Jon Katz (writecathy)
  13. 10
    Crypto: How the Code Rebels Beat the Government Saving Privacy in the Digital Age by Steven Levy (kraaivrouw)
  14. 10
    Pirate Cinema by Cory Doctorow (PghDragonMan)
  15. 00
    Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson (kaledrina)
  16. 00
    Awaken by Katie Kacvinsky (kaledrina)
  17. 00
    The Marbury Lens by Andrew Smith (kaledrina)
  18. 00
    Z by Michael Thomas Ford (kaledrina)
  19. 00
    Scroogled by Cory Doctorow (Liberuno)
  20. 44
    Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson (JFDR)

(see all 27 recommendations)

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English (312)  German (3)  Italian (3)  Hungarian (2)  Spanish (1)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  Indonesian (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (325)
Showing 1-5 of 312 (next | show all)
I've heard of this more than once - told myself I'd try to read it if it fell into my hands.... Well, it did, at a bookcrossing meeting, and though I'm thankful that I had the chance, I just could not get into it at all. The attitude of the MC was such a huge turn-off for me I couldn't get past that into the story at all. Also, I don't like dystopias. Seems like a winner for a lot of folks, though - probably a big hit in school libraries. I will ship this bookcrossed hardcover gratis (within the US).
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Apr 14, 2015 |
I haven't spent much time with YA fiction since I was one a couple of (OK, three) decades ago, but I'd recommend Little Brother to the average teen. Regardless of genre or forum, Cory Doctorow writes passionately about net freedom, privacy, and creativity. Big Brother is a(n unfortunately only slightly) dystopian tale set in the near-future in the U.S. where security has trumped privacy rights and features a Department of Homeland Security run amok in its reaction to a terror attack on San Francisco. The main character is a teen boy and his few friends -- to include strong, capable female characters, good and bad -- who use their wits and technical tricks to expose injustice and free the wrongly detained. It's fast-paced and, at times, even educational. Some reviewers complain that Cory spends a little too much time educating, but I think it's perfect for those who aren't familiar with some of the subject matter, like encryption, RFID, and internet protocol to name a few; those who "know" already know, so Cory could come off as overly pedantic with that audience. Cory's message about the slow erosion of freedom in the U.S. in the name of security is an important one and, I would presume, he's a minority voice in the YA lit sphere. We need more writers like him. The only parental warning I'll throw out is that the main character, Marcus, loses his virginity in the story, but there are no "mechanics" of the event described; I'll just say the parties were protected and it was about as innocent an event as could be portrayed. "It" happened and the story moved on..it wasn't glamorized and no special insight was given that would drive your YA reader into doing.."it." A fun, consistently engaging read and I'm looking forward to reading the sequel, "Homeland." All of Cory's books are free to download at www.craphound.com. If you get something out of them, do him a solid and buy some (or a lot) of copies for school libraries near you. ( )
  traumleben | Mar 1, 2015 |
I loved it. Personally I would have preferred slightly less of the technology explanations and history lessons but maybe that's just because most of it was not new to me. That's really the only reason I didn't give it five stars. Moving on to Homeland straight away. ( )
  jonsson | Feb 11, 2015 |
Sentence description: Teen hacker is abused by the Department of Homeland Security in a near future San Francisco, and proceeds to fights back against the suppression of freedom and government-generated fear that follows a devastating terrorist attack on the city.

I am glad I read (actually, listened to) this book. I am not sure I would say I enjoyed it, completely, but I don't think I was meant to. I did find it frightening. I would find myself going to look at the news and half-expecting to see accounts of the crazy stuff going on in SF. It felt real to me, and believable.

And also, quite often very funny, and informative. I'm a geeky person and a gamer myself so I loved the asides into the games (even LARP!) and technology (especially cause it pretty much all really exists out there!) and gaming and geek culture. I laughed out loud when the main characters used the phrase "a maze of twisty passages, all alike" at one point and loved that one of the critical climactic scenes involved hundreds of people dressing up as vampires and playing a giant vampire game in the middle of the city.

The DHS is portrayed as being pretty much caricatures of evil bullies getting off on power, and there's no time for exploration of any other reason why they might be doing what they are doing. I would have liked to have seen that delved into further, but I admit it's probably outside the scope of this book. I did appreciate, however, the range of reactions we see in the main character's father and friends and schoolmates. Some embrace the curtailment of freedom in the hope it will bring safety, others just look away, still others want to fight but just can't do it.

I have to add a note on the audio-version here: I found the reading a bit odd and stilted in places -- perhaps this is a function of the abundance of IMs and emails and technotalk in the book.

So to sum up, this isn't a light gentle books to entertain, and I suspect it's best for more mature readers due to the amount of "adult content", but for the right reader, this is a book that will linger for a long time.
  devafagan | Jan 2, 2015 |
I was in high school when 9/11 happened, and this book resonated with me in a very personal way. I remember, like the protagonist, being horrified at what was happening to the country, and feeling alone in that sentiment.

And of course, being a Cory Doctorow novel, this book is full of kickass heroes and references to cool real things. ( )
  lavaturtle | Dec 31, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 312 (next | show all)
Little Brother represents a great step forward in the burgeoning subgenre of dystopian young-adult SF. It brings a greater degree of political sophistication, geekiness and civil disobedience to a genre that was already serving up a milder dose of rebellion. After this, no YA novel will be able to get away with watering down its youthful revolution.
 
MY favorite thing about “Little Brother” is that every page is charged with an authentic sense of the personal and ethical need for a better relationship to information technology, a visceral sense that one’s continued dignity and independence depend on it: “My technology was working for me, serving me, protecting me. It wasn’t spying on me. This is why I loved technology: if you used it right, it could give you power and privacy.”

I can’t help being on this book’s side, even in its clunkiest moments. It’s a neat story and a cogently written, passionately felt argument.
 

» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Cory Doctorowprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hayden, Patrick NielsenEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heyborne, KirbyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hoteling, SpringDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Huang, AndrewAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lutjen, PeterCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schneier, BruceAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shimizu, YukoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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People/Characters
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Alice, who makes me whole
First words
I'm a senior at Cesar Chavez high in San Francisco's sunny Mission district, and that makes me one of the most surveilled people in the world.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
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References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
The ultimate tale of teen rebellion -- one seventeen-year-old against the surveillance state. Big Brother is watching you. Who's watching back? Marcus is only seventeen years old, but he figures he already knows how the system works -- and how to work the system. Smart, fast and wise to the ways of the networked world, he has no trouble outwitting his high school's intrusive but clumsy surveillance systems. But his whole world changes when he and his friends find themselves caught in the aftermath of a major terrorist attack on San Francisco. In the wrong place at the wrong time, Marcus and his crew are apprehended by the Department of Homeland Security and whisked away to a secret prison, where they're mercilessly interrogated for days. When the DHS finally releases them, Marcus discovers that his city has become a police state, where every citizen is treated like a potential terrorist. He knows no one will believe his story, which leaves him only one option: to take down the DHS himself.

Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0765319853, Hardcover)

Marcus, a.k.a “w1n5t0n,” is only seventeen years old, but he figures he already knows how the system works–and how to work the system. Smart, fast, and wise to the ways of the networked world, he has no trouble outwitting his high school’s intrusive but clumsy surveillance systems.

But his whole world changes when he and his friends find themselves caught in the aftermath of a major terrorist attack on San Francisco. In the wrong place at the wrong time, Marcus and his crew are apprehended by the Department of Homeland Security and whisked away to a secret prison where they’re mercilessly interrogated for days.

When the DHS finally releases them, Marcus discovers that his city has become a police state where every citizen is treated like a potential terrorist. He knows that no one will believe his story, which leaves him only one option: to take down the DHS himself.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:48:26 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

After being interrogated for days by the Department of Homeland Security in the aftermath of a major terrorist attack on San Francisco, California, seventeen-year-old Marcus, released into what is now a police state, decides to use his expertise in computer hacking to set things right.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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