HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Nemesis: The Battle for Japan, 1944-45 by…
Loading...

Nemesis: The Battle for Japan, 1944-45 (2007)

by Max Hastings

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7551812,297 (4.27)7
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
This was a fantastic book outlining the last years of the war against Japan at the close of World War II. Hastings is an outstanding military historian and I learned a great deal from this book. His writing style is unique in that it tells the story of the war by including literally hundreds of primary source documents from the guys on the ground and the political and military leaders from both sides. I enjoy the understanding I develop of what the fighting was really like, but will admit that at times it is difficult to remain focused when the dozens and dozens of characters names come and go. However, that is more my issue than the author's, and I could not recommend this book enough to people who want to learn about this particular part of history. ( )
  msaucier818 | Apr 9, 2018 |
Most media attention in the Second World War was directed to the European war; Nazis, after all, were quintessentially evil. But across the world, the war was raging as well. Britain and Japan were locked in a struggle over who controlled Burma--with its access to India. Within the Allied leadership, there was a schism as well: the Navy sought to become dominant with its island-hoping strategy that would lead directly the the Japanese home islands. Gen. Douglas MacArthur sought instead to attack Japan by retaking the Philippines--a promise he had made when the Japanese forced him out. Then there was the U.S. Army Air Force that sought to demonstrate, through its strategic B-29 bombing campaign on Japan, that the Air Force deserved its own branch. In the midst of all this, the war continued. This history is a learning opportunity: it introduces you to the leaders and common men engaged in a titanic struggle for Pacific dominance. Japan, unfortunately, with its warrior code of Bushido, was responsible for systemic war crimes (which Japanese society still does not acknowledge in the same way Germany has). Fascinating, compelling, and comprehensive. ( )
  neddludd | Jun 7, 2017 |
Gives a good understanding of the Allies moves to finish off Japan during World War II and the psychological aspects of the Pacific war. ( )
  highlander6022 | Mar 16, 2016 |
A good analysis of the driving forces and ultimate results of the World War II struggle in the Pacific theater. Hastings is no friend of McArthur and seems a hostile to him at times. The book does a great job of laying out the ugly nature of this war even as compared to the war in Europe. ( )
  hmskip | May 3, 2015 |
In Retribution, Max Hastings details the final year of the war in the Pacific, giving background on Japan's invasion of China years before Hitler launched his offensive in Europe, and then following events as driven by the major players involved but also as experienced by the soldiers and sailors playing them out. From MacArthur's efforts to recapture the Philippines (which, Hastings argues, did little to bring about the end of the war), to the climactic naval battle of Leyte Gulf and the advent of kamikaze attacks in the fall of '44, the American Army's efforts in China (dealing with Chiang Kai-shek and Mao) and the British in Burma, the island campaigns of 1945 including Iwo Jima and culminating in Okinawa, the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki placed in their historical context of ongoing "conventional" bombing campaigns which were often equally (and sometimes even more) horrifically deadly, and the Soviet invasion of Manchuria, among other things. Hastings doesn't leave much out.

Perhaps most interesting is Hastings' discussion of Japanese atrocities during the war, both against Allied combatants and prisoners but especially against their Asian conquered subjects, whether Chinese or Filipino. The section on the war-crimes committed in Manila as MacArthur tried to retake it were especially difficult to read (and you can tell listening to the audio edition that even the narrator Simon Vance, whose reading is generally excellent, has a hard time with it). Hastings concludes by noting that unlike the Germans, the Japanese (whose war-time record was in many respects as black as that of the Nazis) have never come to terms with or even acknowledged the crimes in their nation's past. It's little wonder that the Chinese still haven't gotten over it, either.

As usual for Hastings (as you'll know if you've read his Catastrophe 1914, The Korean War, to a lesser extent Winston's War, or especially Inferno), this is mostly grim stuff, but fascinating nonetheless as his research is meticulous and his narrative well-structured. Worth reading.

http://www.amazon.com/review/R66ERORRDU40J ( )
1 vote AshRyan | Jan 19, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Max Hastingsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Belza, CeciliaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
In memory of my son CHARLES HASTINGS 1973-2000
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307263517, Hardcover)

Hailed in Britain as “Spectacular . . . Searingly powerful” (Andrew Roberts, The Sunday Telegraph), a riveting, impeccably informed chronicle of the final year of the Pacific war. In his critically acclaimed Armageddon, Hastings detailed the last twelve months of the struggle for Germany. Here, in what can be considered a companion volume, he covers the horrific story of the war against Japan.

By the summer of 1944 it was clear that Japan’s defeat was inevitable, but how the drive to victory would be achieved remained to be seen. The ensuing drama—that ended in Japan’s utter devastation—was acted out across the vast stage of Asia, with massive clashes of naval and air forces, fighting through jungles, and barbarities by an apparently incomprehensible foe. In recounting the saga of this time and place, Max Hastings gives us incisive portraits of the theater’s key figures—MacArthur, Nimitz, Mountbatten, Chiang Kai-shek, Mao, Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin. But he is equally adept in his portrayals of the ordinary soldiers and sailors—American, British, Russian, Chinese, and Japanese—caught in some of the war’s bloodiest campaigns.

With unprecedented insight, Hastings discusses Japan’s war against China, now all but forgotten in the West, MacArthur’s follies in the Philippines, the Marines at Iwo Jima and Okinawa, and the Soviet blitzkrieg in Manchuria. He analyzes the decision-making process that led to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki—which, he convincingly argues, ultimately saved lives. Finally, he delves into the Japanese wartime mind-set, which caused an otherwise civilized society to carry out atrocities that haunt the nation to this day.

Retribution is a brilliant telling of an epic conflict from a master military historian at the height of his powers.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:21 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

A chronicle of the horrific final year of the Pacific war. By the summer of 1944 it was clear that Japan's defeat was inevitable, but how the victory would be achieved remained to be seen. Hastings gives us incisive portraits of the key figures--MacArthur, Nimitz, Mountbatten, Chiang Kai-shek, Mao, Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin. But he is equally adept in his portrayals of the ordinary soldiers and sailors--American, British, Russian, Chinese, and Japanese--caught in some of the war's bloodiest campaigns. Hastings discusses Japan's war against China--now all but forgotten in the West, MacArthur's follies in the Philippines, the Marines at Iwo Jima and Okinawa, and the Soviet blitzkrieg in Manchuria. He analyzes the decision-making process that led to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki--which, he convincingly argues, ultimately saved lives. Finally, he delves into the Japanese wartime mind-set, which caused an otherwise civilized society to carry out atrocities that haunt the nation to this day.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.27)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 9
3.5 6
4 42
4.5 10
5 41

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 127,245,343 books! | Top bar: Always visible