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The Making of a Confederate: Walter…
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The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil War (New…

by William L. Barney

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A small book telling the story of how a man living in the South evolved into an officer in the Confederate Army and ultimately into a disaffected and "unreconstructed" bitter enemy of the North even after the Civil War. A sad book in many ways this book shows the other side of the CW. Those who "lost" the war and had a way of life they were living changed forever by the conflict. Worh reading again. ( )
  oldman | Mar 5, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0195314344, Paperback)

Despite the advances of the civil rights movement, many white southerners cling to the faded glory of a romanticized Confederate past. In The Making of a Confederate, William L. Barney focuses on the life of one man, Walter Lenoir of North Carolina, to examine the origins of southern white identity alongside its myriad ambiguities and complexities.

Born into a wealthy slaveholding family, Lenoir abhorred the institution, opposed secession, and planned to leave his family to move to Minnesota, in the free North. But when the war erupted in 1860, Lenoir found another escape route--he joined the Confederate army, an experience that would radically transform his ideals. After the war, Lenoir, like many others, embraced the cult of the Lost Cause, refashioning his memory and beliefs in an attempt to make sense of the war, its causes, and its consequences. While some Southerners sank into depression, aligned with the victors, or fiercely opposed the new order, Lenoir withdrew to his acreage in the North Carolina mountains. There, he pursued his own vision of the South's future, one that called for greater self-sufficiency and a more efficient use of the land.

For Lenoir and many fellow Confederates, the war never really ended. As he tells this compelling story, Barney offers new insights into the ways that (selective) memory informs history; through Lenoir's life, readers learn how individual choices can transform abstract historical processes into concrete actions.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:03:43 -0400)

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