HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Complete Works by Michel de Montaigne
Loading...

The Complete Works

by Michel de Montaigne

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
529319,057 (4.44)8
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 8 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
Montaigne is best known for his essays, which comprise about three-fourths of his known works. The remaining quarter of the volume consists of a travel journal and 39 letters on various topics.

Reading Montaigne's essays is like having a conversation with a wise old friend. He rambles a bit, he isn't always consistent, but he speaks always with a warm, reassuring humanity. He isn't a philosopher with some grand scheme for encapsulating the world's knowledge. Instead he teaches us to examine ourselves as he examines himself, to take what is best from life, to relish in moderation that which pleases us, and to sample the full variety of life and humanity.

Montaigne's travel journal, recounting a 17-month trip through France, Switzerland, Germany and Italy in 1580-81, is largely a chronicle of his attempt to find relief from a chronic kidney ailment, yet it does afford interesting comparisons between the different regions in the manner of their housekeeping, dining practices, and religious observances. The 39 letters which conclude the volume are of no great interest compared to the essays, but they do afford some notion of Montaigne's involvement in civic affairs as mayor of Bordeaux. ( )
1 vote StevenTX | Sep 26, 2010 |
What a weird purchase. I recall really like Montaigne in college, but now I just find it "historically interesting," which is to say, not interesting, really.
  leeinaustin | Jul 19, 2008 |
beautiful book. Modern, honest.
  durk | Aug 9, 2007 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Michel de Montaigneprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rat, MauriceEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thibaudet, AlbertEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Of The Education Of Children:

To criticize my own faults in others seems to me no more inconsistent than to criticize, as I often do, other's faults in myself. We must denounce them everywhere and leave them no place to refuge. (131)
Of The Education Of Children:

...these are my humors and opinions; I offer them as what I believe, not what is to be believed. I aim here only at revealing myself, who will perhaps be different tomorrow, if I learn something new which changes me. I have no authority to be believed, nor do I want it, feeling myself too ill-instructed to instruct others. (132)
Of The Education Of Children:

Our tutors never stop bawling in our ears, as though they were pouring water into a funnel; and our task is only to repeat what has been told us. I should like the tutor to correct this practice, and right from the start, according to the capacity of the mind he has in hand, to begin putting it through its paces, making it taste things, choose them, and discern them by itself; sometimes letting him clear his own way. I don't want him to think and talk alone, I want him to listen to his pupil speaking in his turn. Socrates, and later Arecesilaus, often had their disciples speak, and then they spoke to them. 'The authority of those who teach is often an obstacle to those who want to learn [Cicero]. (134)
Of The Education Of Children:

To know by heart is not to know; it is to retain what we have given our memory to keep. (136)
Of The Education Of Children:

...according the the opinion of Plato, who says that steadfastness, faith, and sincerity are the real philosophy, and the other sciences which aim at other things are only powder and rouge. (136)
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 185715259X, Hardcover)

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

Humanist, skeptic, acute observer of himself and others, Michel de Montaigne (1533—92) was the first to use the term “essay” to refer to the form he pioneered, and he has remained one of its most famous practitioners. He reflected on the great themes of existence in his wise and engaging writings, his subjects ranging from proper conversation and good reading, to the raising of children and the endurance of pain, from solitude, destiny, time, and custom, to truth, consciousness, and death. Having stood the test of time, his essays continue to influence writers nearly five hundred years later.

Also included in this complete edition of his works are Montaigne’s letters and his travel journal, fascinating records of the experiences and contemplations that would shape and infuse his essays. Montaigne speaks to us always in a personal voice in which his virtues of tolerance, moderation, and understanding are dazzlingly manifest.

Donald M. Frame’s masterful translation is widely acknowledged to be the classic English version.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:56:15 -0400)

"Humanist, skeptic, acute observer of himself and others, Michel de Montaigne (1533-92) was the first to use the term "essay" to refer to the form he pioneered, and he has remained one of its most famous practitioners. He reflected on the great themes of existence in his writings, his subjects ranging from proper conversation and good reading, to the raising of children and the endurance of pain, from solitude, destiny, time, and custom, to truth, consciousness, and death." "Also included in this complete edition of his works are Montaigne's letters and his travel journal, records of the experiences and contemplations that would shape and infuse his essays. Montaigne speaks to us always in a personal voice in which his virtues of tolerance, moderation, and understanding are manifest."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

Legacy Library: Michel de Montaigne

Michel de Montaigne has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

See Michel de Montaigne's legacy profile.

See Michel de Montaigne's author page.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
38 wanted9 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.44)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3
3.5 7
4 12
4.5 2
5 31

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,256,327 books! | Top bar: Always visible