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Tamara Drewe by Posy Simmonds
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Tamara Drewe

by Posy Simmonds

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Was a good read, but is probably much, much better if you've actually read Far From the Madding Crowd.

Would love to swap with a Hardy fan interested in this and willing to swap their copy. And then compare notes!
  carogriffin | Jun 22, 2014 |
The serenity of a comfy writers' retreat in a quiet English village is disrupted by the arrival of city hipster Tamara Drewe and her new nose-job. An interesting observational story of middle class weekenders and depressed locals, told with well-balanced prose and pictures from several viewpoints. ( )
  questbird | Aug 16, 2012 |
Part graphic novel, part plain text story about Tamara Drewe who inherits her mother's country house and moves in, wreaking havoc on the functional and dysfunctional relationships in the village with her flirty eyes and surgically enhanced nose. Engaging story of the clashes between solid country life and the flighty city life - the juxtaposition between pop-stars in flashy sports-cars and farmhands who work the land and pluck the feathers of ducks is acute. The story is loosely based on a Hardy-novel and it is evident that the drama-part is more that of a 19th century novel, but since the all the characters and their problems are distinctly modern, the mix of styles makes the story quite unique. ( )
  -Eva- | May 30, 2012 |
My very first graphic novel (it's true) from start to finish. I couldn't put it down. The plot and story is so simple it'd be mundane in print. But the pictures! Whoa! The story was meant to be picturised. I couldn't put it down! ( )
  milti | Dec 14, 2011 |
The English countryside. Depending on who you believe you might consider that it has vanished beneath the tarmac of runways or the swooshing blades of wind farms, that it is blighted by second homes or upper class sadists chasing foxes, or is lost in the fog of pesticide being sprayed by tractors slightly larger than houses. The traditional, beautiful English countryside so familiar to us from countless landscape paintings does still exist however, in this particular case it exists between the covers of this book.

This is a stunning piece of work, each turn of the page bringing a new joy. It's not just that the plot and characterisation is captivating and before long the reader is compelled to form predictions and suspicions about which of the characters is doomed, which will somehow come undone and which, if any, will live happily ever after, it's that each turn of the page reveals another astonishing illustration by the ridiculously talented Posy, who can write as well as she can draw, and she draws exceptionally well. Her portraits of the characters are simply superb.

This is a book set in a small English village and, in particular, a writers' retreat based on a farm on the edge of that village. And the writers' retreat is very much on the edge of, and certainly not a part of, the village, the theme of native villagers and incommers is one that is thoroughly explored here and one that Andy, a villager who has seen his family home sold off to townies who rarely live there and who now works as an odd job man and gardener on the farm, is a constant reminder of.

The writer in residence at the writers' retreat is a writer in residence because the farm is his home. A successful writer of successful crime novels, he repays the hard work that his wife puts into running the farm, the business, his life and contributing to his work by being a serial adulterer. He is at home in the countryside because he is what is commonly known as a shit.

Setting the book, at least in part, at a writers' retreat, means that there would be, of course, the temptation to write about writers. While various literary types hang out at the farm, Tamara is on a retreat of her own, taking up residence in her childhood home, and Andy's former family home, in the village, and bringing the sort of trouble to the small community that only an attractive but vain person can. Tamara is a tabloid newspaper columnist, the sort who writes about life in the country from a townie perspective, more fun one concludes than writing about life in the country from a country perspective, consisting as that does of culling badgers, inoculating sheep and sticking your arm up a cow's arse for fun and profit.

Despite the beautifully depicted countryside, this is no pastoral idyl. The village itself is more than a collection of farms and well to do columnists, its home to real people who have a real hard time. From the very first page the boredom of kids who live at the the 'rough end' of the village is acknowledged, although much more is made of this in the second half of the book as the plot starts to twist and turn.

This is a good portrait of bored rural youth. Modern rural youth no longer hang around the bus stop doing nothing, they hang around the bus stop (it's a rural bus stop hence deserted) playing on their mobiles, texting one another about how nothing ever happens. There's even drug abuse, although lacking a village crack dealer the kids inhale propellant from cans of shaving foam. Do not try at home because you will inevitably miscalculate and, unless you intend shaving your nostril hair, end up sneezing soapy gunk for forty minutes for no good reason. Though it will make you light headed.

This is a small but beautiful stage, with a small cast of characters in an isolated setting which makes for a melodramatic plot. Posy makes the English countryside look stunning, the landscape as much a character as Tamara, drawn beautifully. ( )
2 vote macnabbs | Apr 5, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
I love the way Simmonds incorporates food in memories or settings — that’s the way real people talk of things, over meals, or remember key moments, though smell and taste.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Simmonds, Posyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Drescher, HeikeEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frears, StephenPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pröfrock, Ulisecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rehm, DirkEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sztajn, LiliTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0547154127, Paperback)

Posy Simmonds, Britain’s best-loved cartoonist and the author of Gemma Bovery, has now created the irresistible Tamara Drewe, a graphic novel that delightfully skewers modern mores and manners with great wit and understanding for the foibles of humanity.
Loosely inspired by Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd, Tamara Drewe follows a year at Stonefield, a bucolic writer’s retreat run by Beth and Nicholas Hardiman, where Dr. Glen Larson, an American professor and struggling novelist, is staying. The ambitious young Tamara Drewe, mourning the loss of her mother, has returned to her family home nearby. A bookish girl not so long ago, Tamara is now a gossipy columnist at a London paper and undeniably sexy. She quickly has every man in the vicinity—Glen, Nicholas, and the handyman, Andy—falling at her feet, while teenage best friends Casey and Jody become infatuated with Tamara and her ex-rock-star fiancé, Ben. Meanwhile, long-suffering Beth sees to the needs of the writers while managing the farm, the household, and the many affairs of her husband, a best-selling detective novelist.
Perhaps even more satisfying than your favorite nineteenth-century novel, with its fine, expressive drawings, deft storytelling, and nods to both the past and the present, yet unlike anything that has come before, Tamara Drewe is that rare graphic novel for grownups.

Posy Simmonds is the author of many books for adults and children, including the widely acclaimed Gemma Bovery. A. N. Wilson called Gemma Bovery a “work of genius” and more than one reviewer suggested that it should be entered for the Booker Prize. Simmonds has contributed a series of weekly cartoon strips to the UK’s Guardian since 1977 and has won international awards for her work. She lives in London.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:36 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

"Loosely inspired by Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd, Tamara Drewe follows a year at Stonefield, a bucolic writers' retreat run by Beth and Nicholas Hardiman, where Dr. Glen Larson, an American professor and struggling novelist, is staying. The ambitious young Tamara Drewe, mourning the loss of her mother, has returned to her family home nearby. A bookish girl not so long ago, Tamara is now a gossipy columnist at a London paper and undeniably sexy. She quickly has every man in the vicinity - Glen, Nicholas, and the handyman, Andy - falling at her feet, while teenage best friends Casey and Jody become infatuated with Tamara and her ex-rock-star fiance, Ben. Meanwhile, long-suffering Beth sees to the needs of the writers while managing the farm, the household, and the many affairs of her husband, a best-selling detective novelist."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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