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On Natural Selection (Penguin Great Ideas)…
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On Natural Selection (Penguin Great Ideas) (edition 2005)

by Charles Darwin (Author)

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490436,141 (4.12)1
No one has done more to shape our view of what makes us human than Charles Darwin, whose seismic theory of evolution turned the Victorian world upside down, utterly rewrote our notions of life on earth and is still attacked by religious creationists today.
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Title:On Natural Selection (Penguin Great Ideas)
Authors:Charles Darwin (Author)
Info:Penguin Books (2005), 128 pages
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On Natural Selection by Charles Darwin

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I have always been slightly intimidated by Darwin's Origin of Species – it is such a monolith in the history of science that I presumed it would be far too technical for me; but after reading Janet Browne's Darwin's Origin of Species (Books that Shook the World) I searched for a compromise, and this was the book I was looking for.

Although I have not read the original and so cannot compare the two, it is obvious that this text offers only a summary of Darwin's thesis. But within this extract one can truly feel the author's character radiating through; the excitement embodied within the text at times seems positively child-like, and more than once brought a smile to my lips. Having never read Darwin previously, I was pleasantly surprised by his ability to explain his thoughts so clearly while avoiding condescension. As for the structure of the book the editor has clearly executed his/her task superbly, stitching the elements together into a coherent flow.

Although I am sure this can be no substitute for the original, it has certainly served to whet my appetite for more and has shown me that Darwin is not as challenging as I feared he may be, for which I am grateful.
  PickledOnion42 | Oct 31, 2012 |
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Nothing is easier than to admit in words the truth of the universal struggle for life, or more difficult--at least I have found it so--than constantly to bear this conclusion in mind.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Extract of The Origin of Species (Penguin Great Ideas)
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No one has done more to shape our view of what makes us human than Charles Darwin, whose seismic theory of evolution turned the Victorian world upside down, utterly rewrote our notions of life on earth and is still attacked by religious creationists today.

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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