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Dawn of the Dumb by Charlie Brooker
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Dawn of the Dumb (edition 2012)

by Charlie Brooker

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394None27,031 (3.86)10
Member:Bex_1979
Title:Dawn of the Dumb
Authors:Charlie Brooker
Info:Faber and Faber (2012), Paperback, 368 pages
Collections:2012 Books Read
Rating:****
Tags:None

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Dawn of the Dumb: Dispatches from the Idiotic Frontline by Charlie Brooker

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
In parts - hilarious. In others, not so much. But an ok read ( )
  lallycow | Feb 11, 2013 |
A collection of Brooker's colomns from the Guardian. I didn't get a lot of the pop culture references, but it doesn't matter because is an hilarious writer. Always worth looking out for ( )
  marek2010 | Jan 9, 2013 |
A collection of Brooker's columns for The Guardian, which proves most amusing in parts, but is repetitive on the topics of Big Brother et al.

If I'd read the original columns, this book wouldn't have been so much fun I suspect. ( )
1 vote floriferous | Jul 12, 2012 |
Absolutely hilarious! Brooker's 'Dawn of the Dumb' is a squealing delight of sarcasm, satire and slating of everyone and everything from 2005 to 2007 - it makes for a highly entertaining read. There were plenty of times reading this book that I found myself laughing aloud with perverse pleasure at his absolute scathing of anyone from TV psychics, to David Cameron. Brooker is a funny, funny guy.

Only 9/10 because whilst Charlie Brooker is side-splittingly funny at destroying celebrities, and making you see serious TV programmes in a much more entertaining light, some of his articles seem to be targeted at nobody, and serve very little of a purpose - it seems he just wants to have a bit of a moan. Chances are he wrote these whilst drunk, or under pressure to meet a deadline, or simply that's just my want to defend the fact that Brooker is excellent, despite the fact he does show weaker signs of his work here. He should, in my opinion, stick to what he does best, and I think the book would have been perhaps better absent such articles because they do seem to instill disappointment in the reader, not being anywhere near as funny and a bit of a mood-kill, to the point where I was subconsciously scanning the pages for Italics indicating a TV programme which he's about to completely annihilate, as opposed to where he just complaining about "people".

Brooker is nevertheless, brilliant. I wasn't even halfway through this book and I was recommending it to anybody who would listen! ( )
  kezumi | Aug 28, 2011 |
It's hard to know how to comment on this book. On the one hand, I thought it was screamingly funny when I started reading it. Charlie Brooker is the master of the insult and he's prepared to describe segments of society as stupid, boring, useless and generally give voice to all the frustrations we feel with the rubbish we face every day and say the things that we would love (but simply wouldn't dare) to have said ourselves. He does it very well. Extremely well, in fact. I can't think of anyone who does it better.

The problem is that that's pretty well all he does and by the time I got halfway through this collection of articles I was desperately willing him to say something new rather than simply come up with another outrageous metaphor for how stupid Big Brother contestants are. So I really enjoyed the first half of the book but the second half was a real struggle. With hindsight, it would have been a good book to dip into. As it is, I ended up feeling that it was very samey — you don't notice this in a weekly newspaper column as you have seven days to reset yourself but presented all at once there feels like there's a distinct lack of variety. ( )
1 vote SkyRider | Sep 29, 2010 |
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Polite, pensive, mature, reserved ... Charlie Brooker is none of these things and less. Rude, unhinged, outrageous, and above all funny, Dawn of the Dumb is essential reading for anyone with a brain and a spinal cord. And hands for turning the pages. Picking up where his hilarious 'Screen Burn' left off, Dawn of the Dumb collects the best of Charlie Brooker's recent TV writing, together with uproarious spleen-venting diatribes on a range of non-televisual subjects - tackling everything from David Cameron to human hair. All the pieces collected here originally appeared in the Guardian.… (more)

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