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The Race Card: How Bluffing About Bias Makes…
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The Race Card: How Bluffing About Bias Makes Race Relations Worse

by Richard Thompson Ford

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An interesting trend between an unwarranted claim of bias and bad law/precedence being establsihed. Legitimate claims don't seem to fare much better. ( )
  pilarflores | Jun 14, 2011 |
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In memory of Richard Donald Ford
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In November 1987, a deputy sheriff was dispatched to an apartment building in Dutchess County, upstate New York.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374245754, Hardcover)

What do Katrina victims waiting for federal disaster relief, millionaire rappers buying vintage champagne, Ivy League professors waiting for taxis, and ghetto hustlers trying to find steady work have in common? All have claimed to be victims of racism. These days almost no one openly expresses racist beliefs or defends bigoted motives. So lots of people are victims of bigotry, but no one's a bigot? What gives? Either a lot of people are lying about their true beliefs and motivations, or a lot of people are jumping to unwarranted conclusions--or just playing the race card.
 
As the label of "prejudice" is applied to more and more situations, it loses a clear and agreed-upon meaning. This makes it easy for self-serving individuals and political hacks to use accusations of racism, sexism, homophobia, and other types of "bias" to advance their own ends. Richard Thompson Ford, a Stanford Law School professor, brings sophisticated legal analysis, lively and eye-popping anecdotes, and plain old common sense to this heated topic. He offers ways to separate valid claims from bellyaching. Daring, entertaining, and incisive, The Race Card is a call for us to treat racism as a social problem that must be objectively understood and honestly evaluated.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:03:38 -0400)

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As the label of "prejudice" is applied to more and more situations, it loses a clear and agreed-upon meaning. This makes it easy for self-serving individuals and political hacks to use accusations of racism, sexism, homophobia, and other types of "bias" to advance their own ends. Law professor Ford brings sophisticated legal analysis, lively anecdotes, and plain old common sense to this heated topic, offering ways to separate valid claims from bellyaching. This is a call for us to treat racism as a social problem that must be objectively understood and honestly evaluated.--From publisher description.… (more)

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